I am very passionate about getting a job at Google. How do I get a job at Google?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Jefferson Fry



I am very passionate about getting a job at Google. How do I get a job at Google?

Applying on the careers page and if shortlisted, going through the rounds of interviews.

Build for everyone - Google CareersCareers at Google - find a job at Google. See engineering jobs on Google http://careers.google.com

What prevents everyone from wanting to become an Olympian? A top sports star? A highly acclaimed author?

All of the above requires a combination of proper aptitude and sufficient drive to learn and practice your art.

Keep in mind that you cannot decide to have the right fitness. So even if you have the motivation and courage to get the job done, getting good enough to work on a FAANG also requires something innate that cannot be learned.

There are also orthogonal traits that you need to be hired by a FAANG. A reasonable personality. (Idiots will find it harder to pass the interview

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What prevents everyone from wanting to become an Olympian? A top sports star? A highly acclaimed author?

All of the above requires a combination of proper aptitude and sufficient drive to learn and practice your art.

Keep in mind that you cannot decide to have the right fitness. So even if you have the motivation and courage to get the job done, getting good enough to work on a FAANG also requires something innate that cannot be learned.

There are also orthogonal traits that you need to be hired by a FAANG. A reasonable personality. (Idiots will have a harder time passing the interview without someone giving them a resounding no.) The ability to accept criticism. The ability to operate under pressure. And a great ability to communicate.

But take a minute back: "The best" often work at FAANG companies, but sometimes choose to work elsewhere or start their own companies. And frankly, there are not enough "the best" in the world that FAANG companies can hire enough employees if they only hire at that level.

Instead I would say they hire strong and super competent software engineers. They are all good, maybe even mostly great engineers. But you can't hire on the FAANG scale and expect every hire to be the best.

And yes, I affirm that not everyone has the right combination of aptitude, temperament and guts to become one of those strong and super-competent software engineers. I have lost count of how many so-called "senior" engineers I have met who weren't even close to the right level to succeed at FAANG. And nothing they could have done would have pushed them to the top.

I know someone who worked exceptionally hard for several years with the dream of one day getting a job at Google. He even completed a doctorate in computer science at a prestigious research university. He went through multiple rounds of intensive interviews with Google, but was not offered a job. He was crushed for a while after that, but took a job with a Google competitor and then started starting his own successful company. I know many others who got a job at Google, often with less than a PhD, so I've seen both sides.

Here is my impression of what it takes to get aj

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I know someone who worked exceptionally hard for several years with the dream of one day getting a job at Google. He even completed a doctorate in computer science at a prestigious research university. He went through multiple rounds of intensive interviews with Google, but was not offered a job. He was crushed for a while after that, but took a job with a Google competitor and then started starting his own successful company. I know many others who got a job at Google, often with less than a PhD, so I've seen both sides.

This is my impression of what it takes to get a job at Google. Not all the people who work there are superheroes. Many are relatively normal and quiet people. Some are surprisingly eccentric. Google looks for a good match between the job candidate and Google's unique culture and work style. Being a little quirky might even work to your advantage. Of course, they also look for a good match between the job description and the candidate's qualifications. For many positions, they really like to see that you can think creatively on your feet and solve problems efficiently (and gracefully).

Therefore, your chances of landing a job there will largely depend on whether you "get" and reflect the culture of Google, not just whether there is a good match between your skills and experience and the type of job you are applying for. You can go into an interview saying that you like to work long hours independently and generally work 70 hours a week. This could be seen as a mismatch, as collaborative work is placed in a high value at Google, and many there enjoy their free time in the evenings and on weekends (and don't want to bother with work during those times). Interviewers may also wonder if you have trouble with focus, productivity, and follow-through if you typically work 70 hours a week.

If you are applying for a job at Google that many people apply for, you will likely need to demonstrate creativity, inventiveness, and thought leadership in your field. At the NIPS conference, I attended a presentation on one-year internships at Google related to neural networks / machine learning that included a competitive salary and benefits. They said they were looking for candidates who would push the boundaries of the field and have remarkable accomplishments to prove it, for example, someone who had received one of the annual "best paper" awards at the NIPS conference. Look up the acceptance rate for NIPS documents. Now imagine how difficult it is to get something like one of the NIPS awards for best article of the year. So . . . um, good luck with that.

Also, don't rely on job references to increase your chances of landing a job or internship at Google, because they may not even be called. However, they can evaluate what you have published publicly on the web. Also, you may need exceptionally good "soft skills" to make the cut during the interview process; that's where many stumble.

If you're determined to work at Google, first, learn all you can about Google by talking directly to current and former Google employees about their experiences. You can easily do this at any conference where Google has booths. Examine your motivations for wanting to work there and decide if it really suits you as well as you currently imagine. For example, if you have a competitive advantage, prefer to work alone, and yearn for individual recognition of your accomplishments, the academy may be a better route for you. Decide how much you are willing and feasible to sacrifice for a chance to land a job at Google, knowing that there are no guarantees that your efforts will be worth it or that you will be able to get the kind of job you really want. in Google.

Option 1 - For individuals with low or moderate skills and patients: Look at all of your entry-level positions with an open mind (for example, in sales, advertising, usability evaluation, etc.). In what positions could he enjoy and excel? What positions are you most qualified for? And finally, what positions would give you a great experience for your ideal job at Google? Consider applying for "niche" jobs with high demand and a short supply of qualified candidates. Increase your chances by being willing to move to any Google location. If you can't get an entry-level job at Google, get and excel at a similar job at a Google affiliate or Google-like company, staying for two to three years. Later, Re-apply to Google for entry-level positions, and eventually for intermediate-level positions, as you gain more experience. If you do eventually land a job at Google, over a period of several years, do your best to get into a position that allows you to do the kind of work you enjoy the most. This could mean reviewing your job description, getting a promotion, or applying for other positions within Google every few years. The job you will end up with may be different than what you initially envisioned if you go this route, but that doesn't mean you won't enjoy it immensely if Google's culture really is a great match for you and your work style. If you do eventually land a job at Google, over a period of several years, do your best to get into a position that allows you to do the kind of work you enjoy the most. This could mean reviewing your job description, getting a promotion, or applying for other positions within Google every few years. The job you will end up with may be different than what you initially envisioned if you go this route, but that doesn't mean you won't enjoy it immensely if Google's culture really is a great match for you and your work style. If you do eventually land a job at Google, over a period of several years, do your best to get into a position that allows you to do the kind of work you enjoy the most. This could mean reviewing your job description, getting a promotion, or applying for other positions within Google every few years. The job you will end up with may be different than what you initially envisioned if you go this route, but that doesn't mean you won't enjoy it immensely if Google's culture really is a great match for you and your work style. Get promoted or apply for other positions within Google every few years. The job you will end up with may be different than what you initially envisioned if you go this route, but that doesn't mean you won't enjoy it immensely if Google's culture really is a great match for you and your work style. Get promoted or apply for other positions within Google every few years. The job you will end up with may be different than what you initially envisioned if you go this route, but that doesn't mean you won't enjoy it immensely if Google's culture really is a great match for you and your work style.

Option 2: For highly trained and original thought leaders in your field: You could try to get an internship at Google or with a close Google affiliate. These are not easy to come by as there are usually many highly qualified applicants. To qualify for a one-year internship that pays a competitive salary and includes benefits (often seen as a kind of trial work period), you will likely need to let them fly from the start with your achievements, code / portfolio (if applicable ), application, and interpersonal / communication skills in your interviews. So you would need to perform very well, and work well with your project teams, during the internship to have a decent chance of being hired long-term.

Option 3: The Most Ambitious Route - Study Google Job Ads / Vacancies and select your dream job. Then, for the next several years, work towards obtaining all the required and desired qualifications for that position. Stay on top of changes in what Google is looking for in that type of job candidate as you move toward your goal. Learn as efficiently as possible, which generally means more "hands-on" and self-study, and less traditional course work. Take an internship at Google if possible along the way. If you can't intern with them, do it or work for companies that are as similar to Google as possible, ideally Google affiliates or the type of company Google would buy. Work independently on your own, as well as in teams (on a voluntary basis as needed), performing exemplary work that demonstrates relevant experience for your ideal position. Compete and win Kaggle competitions, for example (if relevant to your desired position). Don't stop working on your communication and project management skills along the way. Find out what the best networking conferences Google sponsors and recruits are. Present and win prizes for the work you submit at those conferences. Network and collaborate on articles / projects whenever possible with Google employees, but make sure you do it in a respectful and relaxed way (the last thing you want is to be perceived as annoying). Polish your resume and cover letter. Practice extensively with friends for Google-style interviews, the last and most difficult obstacle to overcome. Lastly, don't be afraid to be yourself.

Best of luck!

You want to know what it takes to get a job at Google in a month.

  1. Be a known expert in an area that Google is interested in.
  2. Have 5 or more years of experience in a major technology company such as Facebook, Microsoft, Amazon with constant advancement in roles and responsibilities that demonstrate successful completion of tasks.
  3. Have an internal reference (preferably more than one) that is highly respected and lists you as one of the top candidates they know.
  4. Have completed 2 or 3 successful graduate internships with them and graduate with an advanced degree within the month.

Note that he had a couple of those qualifications and

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You want to know what it takes to get a job at Google in a month.

  1. Be a known expert in an area that Google is interested in.
  2. Have 5 or more years of experience in a major technology company such as Facebook, Microsoft, Amazon with constant advancement in roles and responsibilities that demonstrate successful completion of tasks.
  3. Have an internal reference (preferably more than one) that is highly respected and lists you as one of the top candidates they know.
  4. Have completed 2 or 3 successful graduate internships with them and graduate with an advanced degree within the month.

Keep in mind that I had a couple of those qualifications and it still took me 3 months to get my offer and I had to go through the interview process like everyone else and could easily not have received an offer.

Do you want something simpler? Sorry, there is no magic bullet other than working and gaining relevant experience and being successful and hopefully memorable for your colleagues.

You could also ask how to compete in a professional sports tournament in a month.

The top tech companies are the professional sports teams of the programming world. Yes, they sometimes hire undrafted free agents, but they prefer to hire known numbers.

Set a reasonable goal. It's not that you can never work for a high-tech company, but expecting to do so in a short amount of time, unless you're already ready to do so, is unrealistic.

I know someone who got a job at Google in Silicon Valley straight from Bangladesh. Needless to say, he was very good at coding. Also I worked at google as an intern (more like a Bootcamp) for a week. I worked in Android Studio making some simple applications.

So suffice it to say that you can get into Google if you have a solid understanding of data structures and algorithms (if you want to work as a Java or C ++ programmer). Their salaries start from 100k plus benefits, more if you are a good negotiator.

Here are some elementary programming skills that you need to master before jumping into the hardcore program.

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I know someone who got a job at Google in Silicon Valley straight from Bangladesh. Needless to say, he was very good at coding. Also I worked at google as an intern (more like a Bootcamp) for a week. I worked in Android Studio making some simple applications.

So suffice it to say that you can get into Google if you have a solid understanding of data structures and algorithms (if you want to work as a Java or C ++ programmer). Their salaries start from 100k plus benefits, more if you are a good negotiator.

Here are some elementary programming skills to master before moving on to hardcore programming, after which you should be ready to go to work for Google.

Java tutorial

Object Oriented Programming Concepts in Java

GeeksforGeeks | A computer portal for geeks

Data structures - GeeksforGeeks (the most important and advanced in my opinion)

Programming problems for dp

Also look at this answer: Piyush Jain's answer to What would be a 3-month roadmap to learn the data structures and algorithm for this summer break?

Finally, after starting work at Google, you should expect to enjoy one of the best working environments and not to mention their amazing free food (you can take a lot home with you!) Don't forget to visit their massage parlor (yes, they have a massage parlor and also a GYM inside their Manhattan office!)

Go here: Search - Careers on Google and check current Google job openings. That will give you an idea of ​​the types of positions they have and the qualifications they expect.

If you find a vacancy of interest and are qualified, you can apply to work for them directly online from the job posting. If you find vacancies that interest you but * don't * qualify, write down the gaps (including those in the "Preferred Qualifications" list, because I can tell you, as someone who influenced hiring at another major high-tech company, those are the talents that make resumes float

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Go here: Search - Careers on Google and check current Google job openings. That will give you an idea of ​​the types of positions they have and the qualifications they expect.

If you find a vacancy of interest and are qualified, you can apply to work for them directly online from the job posting. If you find openings that interest you but * don't * qualify, write down the gaps (including those on the "Preferred Qualifications" list, because I can tell you, as someone who influenced hiring at another major high-tech company, those are the talents that make resumes float to the top of the pile) and keep looking.

My quick read of current Google job openings indicates that they expect to have a solid track record of relevant work experience. Of course, consider whether or not you can spin your past to fit what they're looking for, but if you can't, you may need to seek employment elsewhere to bolster your credentials.

What were you doing? If you were doing software engineering then they might be interested. If you were cleaning fish tanks, not so much.

Big companies try to hire people who are successful in the jobs they need. Are you good at designing and writing software? If so, is it obvious from your experience and your upbringing and the way you speak and act?

The jobs you've had, the schools you've attended, the degrees you've earned - these are all just signs of whether you're likely to do well as a software engineer.

There is no easy way to get a job at Google. I have few working at Google, based on their credentials i'm drawing few requirements.

Typical requirements are

  • Excellent academics from the start
  • For newbies, they only look for the best cream colleges
  • Sharpness for problem solving and lateral thinking ability and innovation.
  • They never look for someone with experience, they look for expertise in the domain

A2A.

Ratings are just one thing.

You are definitely expected to have a strong academic background (bachelor's degree or higher) in Computer Science.

But ultimately, a lot depends on whether you erase your screening process: phone screens and on-site interviews. He is expected to be a great troubleshooter (CS problems) and to be very adept at using data structures to come up with optimal solutions for algorithmic problems and to be able to translate that into clean, bug-free code. For senior positions, a good understanding of system design is also a requirement.

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