I am overqualified and inexperienced. What I can do?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Hayden Schwartz



I am overqualified and inexperienced. What I can do?

I am overqualified and inexperienced. What I can do?

I have just finished my graduate education. I can't get jobs that suit my education as they require years of experience that I don't have, but I can't get jobs that don't require experience because I'm overqualified. I applied for 32 jobs in the last 2 months, I attended 17 interviews but nothing.

From the American point of view….

If you apply for 32 jobs and get 17 interviews, then you have good application materials. In fact, if you get only 10% of your applications that result in interviews, you are doing well.

But here is what I see as the problem. Assumin

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I am overqualified and inexperienced. What I can do?

I have just finished my graduate education. I can't get jobs that suit my education as they require years of experience that I don't have, but I can't get jobs that don't require experience because I'm overqualified. I applied for 32 jobs in the last 2 months, I attended 17 interviews but nothing.

From the American point of view….

If you apply for 32 jobs and get 17 interviews, then you have good application materials. In fact, if you get only 10% of your applications that result in interviews, you are doing well.

But here is what I see as the problem. Assuming 3-5 candidates are interviewed for a given vacancy, then you should expect a job offer after 3-5 interviews, or let's stretch that from 5-8.

If you don't get an offer after 17 interviews, then your problem is obviously your ability to interview. If your university has a career center, ask them to train you in interviews. Or if not, like your teachers for some guidance.

Also, about finding work, like your teachers for help, even if the job is a kind of stepping stone for which you are highly overqualified. This is where networking is key.

Get experience. As much as you can, as fast as you can, where you can. Go to the bottom. Look for accountability, responsibility, ability to achieve measurable results. Consider volunteer work as a supplement if your 'regular' job is not consuming. And ... give up the attitude of being "overqualified". You may be over-educated, but you are not overqualified if you are inexperienced. If you were qualified, employers would be kicking down your door. They are not. And… get some advice from the people at the interview. If you've had 17 interviews out of 32 applications (decent average), you may not be

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Get experience. As much as you can, as fast as you can, where you can. Go to the bottom. Look for accountability, responsibility, ability to achieve measurable results. Consider volunteer work as a supplement if your 'regular' job is not consuming. And ... give up the attitude of being "overqualified". You may be over-educated, but you are not overqualified if you are inexperienced. If you were qualified, employers would be kicking down your door. They are not. And ... get some advice from the people at the interview. If you've had 17 interviews out of 32 applications (decent average), you may not be doing well in the interview. (That assumes these were positions you should have been looking for in the first place.) Last two points: Sometimes, It takes more than 2 months for a company to make a real hiring decision, so be patient and follow up. Networking is a more productive route than searching for ads and submitting applications. Spend most of your time there.

Good luck. Do not despair or despair, it will show. Take comfort in knowing that virtually everyone has been where you are now. Sometimes life even puts us back there

I don't think I've ever met someone who was overqualified and inexperienced, because those two things often go hand in hand. Sorry to burst your bubble, but just because you went to school doesn't mean you're overqualified for something, I think someone mentioned it here, but I'll say it again, your interviewing skills are probably pretty bad.

You need to learn to interview properly, stop thinking about your ego being overqualified for the things you apply to (if the interviewer says it's the easiest way not to hire you), and learn some skills. But those are just my two

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I don't think I've ever met someone who was overqualified and inexperienced, because those two things often go hand in hand. Sorry to burst your bubble, but just because you went to school doesn't mean you're overqualified for something, I think someone mentioned it here, but I'll say it again, your interviewing skills are probably pretty bad.

You need to learn to interview properly, stop thinking about your ego being overqualified for the things you apply to (if the interviewer says it's the easiest way not to hire you), and learn some skills. But that's just my bit, take it or leave it!

Ask yourself a question that Mr. Narendra Modi had asked a young gentleman from India.

What (work) can you do?

actually, I wanted to know "what job-related skill you have."

The answer was: I am Double MA (Master of Arts)

Now do this exercise with a pencil and paper.

Ask yourself the same question What can you do? and list.

For instance.

  1. Good for driving cars and 4-wheelers.
  2. good at shorthand.
  3. Learn to communicate in English.
  4. teach someone math (or another subject)
  5. Get to know agriculture.
  6. can do website.
  7. etc
  8. etc.

after this you need to find out what skills were n

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Ask yourself a question that Mr. Narendra Modi had asked a young gentleman from India.

What (work) can you do?

actually, I wanted to know "what job-related skill you have."

The answer was: I am Double MA (Master of Arts)

Now do this exercise with a pencil and paper.

Ask yourself the same question What can you do? and list.

For instance.

  1. Good for driving cars and 4-wheelers.
  2. good at shorthand.
  3. Learn to communicate in English.
  4. teach someone math (or another subject)
  5. Get to know agriculture.
  6. can do website.
  7. etc
  8. etc.

After this, you need to find out what skills were needed in the job postings for 32 jobs you applied for.

Learn those skills from any good skills development course.

Write all the reasons why 17 interviews were looking for you.

Please always keep in mind that you do not work to become someone, say PM or President.

work for the improvement of our society.

Help others to get help.

It is more important to a person with the right job than any job.

That is why all students must do internships. Then they have the work experience.

Your education is not your only qualification; your work experience is also a type of degree.

Without the work experience, if you have a hard time finding a job without it: you are not overqualified, you are not qualified. Just not where you thought it mattered.

Ohh dear .. sorry to hear that and it is very unfortunate.

This is a general phenomenon of the Indian educational system. We generally acquire degrees that make us overqualified for many jobs. But the real question is ... have we acquired the skills that qualify us for a particular job?

We must analyze our skills, including soft skills, and try to update the missing ones.

Remind! one will have to start somewhere to gain experience. Be considerate and open to jobs in your field of expertise, even if it pays less for now. Instead, focus on the job profile and the learning opportunity.

I wish you success. Everybody

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Ohh dear .. sorry to hear that and it is very unfortunate.

This is a general phenomenon of the Indian educational system. We generally acquire degrees that make us overqualified for many jobs. But the real question is ... have we acquired the skills that qualify us for a particular job?

We must analyze our skills, including soft skills, and try to update the missing ones.

Remind! one will have to start somewhere to gain experience. Be considerate and open to jobs in your field of expertise, even if it pays less for now. Instead, focus on the job profile and the learning opportunity.

I wish you success. All the best!

We like to think that, in a market economy, only top-tier companies are successful. But I think it's more common like a greyhound race where the three-legged dog beats the two-legged dog. There are many mediocre companies that hardly know about hiring from a hole in the ground. They are overrepresented in current job vacancies, because many of their employees quit in disgust. You should be almost as glad you are not hired by some companies as you will be when you are hired. Getting an interview for every two applications indicates that you have some very impressive qualifications.

Well, just accept it!

You are TOTALLY in the wrong place, if you feel like you are overqualified among your peers at work. On the other hand, if you feel that you are unqualified, you should graciously accept the fact that you have a lot of work to do. He learns every day from his colleagues at work and eventually improves. It is an amazing place to be. Just imagine! every day you learn new things, you explore new things. You would realize that you know little and there is much to learn. Life is just that!

I entered a 3D audio PhD program in 2011 at NTU Singapore.

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Well, just accept it!

You are TOTALLY in the wrong place, if you feel like you are overqualified among your peers at work. On the other hand, if you feel that you are unqualified, you should graciously accept the fact that you have a lot of work to do. He learns every day from his colleagues at work and eventually improves. It is an amazing place to be. Just imagine! every day you learn new things, you explore new things. You would realize that you know little and there is much to learn. Life is just that!

I entered a 3D audio PhD program in 2011 at NTU Singapore. During my fourth stint there, I felt like I was totally disqualified from working in that lab. In fact, he was not qualified! My colleagues were super amazing doing things that make you feel "Okay how did I get to this place? What am I doing here with these amazing guys?" But that pushed me to improve. Eventually they felt it was worthy of getting a Ph.D. Then later, I joined NASA's Ames Research Center as a visiting research scientist. Well, here I was working with people who were considered legends in the field with 40 years of research experience. Was I poorly rated? Oh yeah! I was there for only 5 months, but I had the experience of a lifetime.

I then joined the sound recording department at McGill University as a postdoctoral fellow. I meet a couple of PhD students over coffee and I learn that one is a Grammy Award winner and the other is an Emmy Award. Then I met a group of professors that I would be working with and they are worth 20 Grammys. Am I not qualified to work here? OF COURSE! You just accept it and get better at your job.

Bottom line: Always go to a place where your peers are much better than you!

The simple answer is yes. But being "overqualified" is considered a bad thing, not because someone "overqualified" performs too well, but because they are expected to be dissatisfied with the job.

Of course, a person who is "overqualified" will generally learn his job in minimal time. They will also outperform most "average" candidates, as they can offer suggestions on how to improve the processes associated with their work.

So the concept of being overqualified is more of a perception problem. Overqualified generally means you have more experience or education than the specific position r

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The simple answer is yes. But being "overqualified" is considered a bad thing, not because someone "overqualified" performs too well, but because they are expected to be dissatisfied with the job.

Of course, a person who is "overqualified" will generally learn his job in minimal time. They will also outperform most "average" candidates, as they can offer suggestions on how to improve the processes associated with their work.

So the concept of being overqualified is more of a perception problem. Overqualified generally means you have more experience or education than the specific position requires. No more no less.

  • The idea is that you have an entry-level position and apply for someone with 20 years of experience. Technically, the person is overqualified, in the sense that they are entry-level, when it means that you are paying for someone with minimal training and no experience, but getting more for your money.
  • This would also apply in the event that an experienced manager assumes a lower-level supervisor position.

The same goes for professional positions. I was looking for engineering positions, and yet I took technician jobs so I could pay my bills. I was overqualified for technician positions, because they required a two-year degree, and I had started working on my master's degree.

So what is the problem? Dissatisfaction on several levels.

  • First, your immediate supervisor may not have the same qualifications as the candidate. That always works so well!
  • Second, sometimes an overqualified candidate will join an organization in hopes of moving up the ladder, once a suitable vacancy arises. Many companies prefer to promote within, so in this case it can be beneficial for everyone. However, sometimes that happens too slowly, and that's where the problems start ...
  • Overqualified people can jump ship when a better offer comes up. That's the top concern of the hiring manager, and frankly, it's legitimate. They will have to repeat their entire recruitment exercise one more time ...

I think a balance is necessary. I have been overqualified for several of my jobs and I left those companies after a few years. But I also left them with many accomplishments that benefited them for years after I left.

This is how many of us feel when we are on that boat….

How ironic for applicants who cannot get a job because they need experience to get a job, and highly experienced workers cannot get a job because they are perceived as too experienced (overqualified).

One of the most glaring problems with being overqualified is that potential employers make a lot of assumptions about your job preferences and inclinations and whether they will fit in well with the culture.

  • Being overqualified means that most employers will not be willing to pay an employee more money for qualifications they do not consider essential for the job.
  • Another problem arises fr
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How ironic for applicants who cannot get a job because they need experience to get a job, and highly experienced workers cannot get a job because they are perceived as too experienced (overqualified).

One of the most glaring problems with being overqualified is that potential employers make a lot of assumptions about your job preferences and inclinations and whether they will fit in well with the culture.

  • Being overqualified means that most employers will not be willing to pay an employee more money for qualifications they do not consider essential for the job.
  • Another problem arises from the assumption that the employee will leave as soon as a better opportunity presents itself. It costs a lot of time and money to train someone to leave after a short period of time.
  • If an applicant is particularly bright and confident during the interview, they may be perceived as a potential threat to their future co-workers or even their manager, who may have a fragile ego.
  • Boredom; work is not a challenge. Companies want to hire people who they believe will stay and who generally enjoy their day job.
  • If the position demands a high level of compliance, the employee may be perceived as too independent due to their level of experience and may not be willing to follow instructions.
  • That the employee will not be happy to work for a less experienced manager.

If you are being overlooked because you think you are overqualified, the burden is on you to defend the position you want.

Here are some tips that can make employers more open-minded.

Consider dropping some of your previous positions, advanced degrees, and graduation dates. You can also reduce your language to something more simplified.

You could also share that you are looking for a career change and that you are also applying for similar positions with the same level of responsibility. This disclosure will indicate to them that you are being deliberate about the level of responsibility you seek.

Perhaps you are semi-retired and want to maintain a connection to your industry, or you have a passion for the position and want to step away from a managerial position. These factors can make a difference when it comes to getting the job.

My experiences and thoughts after reviewing dozens of resumes (and seeing overqualified hires in action) for someone who is overqualified for the position:

  • They will tend to think that the job is a little below them. This ends up potentially causing morale problems in the office where an employee constantly belittles or thinks they are above the job they are doing.
  • Since they are accepting a lower position of responsibility than they are used to, an employer automatically assumes that this person is going to look for another job. If you are used to doing a position t
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My experiences and thoughts having looked at dozens of resumes (and seen over-qualified hires in action) for someone who is overqualified for the position:

  • They will tend to think that the job is a little below them. This ends up potentially causing morale problems in the office where an employee constantly belittles or thinks they are above the job they are doing.
  • Since they are accepting a lower position of responsibility than they are used to, an employer automatically assumes that this person is going to look for another job. If they are used to doing a position that normally pays 80k, and they are earning 55k, chances are they are looking for a new position that better suits their background and that pays 80k. I don't care if this person finds a position in a month or in two or three years - training people is time and resource consuming, and if you know they will be leaving in a relatively short period of time, you are better off just not hiring them.
  • You wonder about the professional mindset of someone applying for a position for which they are overqualified. Why are they going for something they can clearly do and / or clearly don't have a professional reason for doing it? Why? It is difficult to ask and articulate this question to someone and get an honest answer as to why. In theory, you want employees who are in a position to challenge them. If they are not challenged, they are not fully committed. If they are not engaged, they are not necessarily emotionally or professionally involved in their position. All of that leads to problems in the future.

I understand in times of a recessionary economy why people apply for positions for which they are overqualified. However, it is difficult to understand the mindset of people in good times applying for positions for which they are clearly overqualified. As an employer, I walk cautiously with people applying for positions that they are overqualified for because I only see pain in the future.

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