I am on the fourth day after I have stopped smoking for the first time since I started many years ago. Is the peak of discomfort over?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Leo Odom



I am on the fourth day after I have stopped smoking for the first time since I started many years ago. Is the peak of discomfort over?

Despite what others say, it is easy to quit smoking if done the right way.

I know it will upset a lot of people, but the truth hurts.

In short, when I quit smoking, it was easy and I was immediately happy and excited.

Smoking is a mental psychological trap. Millions have been invested to keep you in this trap through subliminal and suggestive messages hidden in movies and popular culture with all forms of media, from newspapers to magazines. It is much more subtle than it used to be, although it is there.

There are 2 things you need to make it easy to quit smoking.

  1. Become aw
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Despite what others say, it is easy to quit smoking if done the right way.

I know it will upset a lot of people, but the truth hurts.

In short, when I quit smoking, it was easy and I was immediately happy and excited.

Smoking is a mental psychological trap. Millions have been invested to keep you in this trap through subliminal and suggestive messages hidden in movies and popular culture with all forms of media, from newspapers to magazines. It is much more subtle than it used to be, although it is there.

There are 2 things you need to make it easy to quit smoking.

  1. Be aware of brainwashing, which other people tell you that it is difficult to quit smoking is part of this. I'm not saying it's a massive conspiracy or anything like that, I'm saying that people who tell you it's difficult, they think it's because they were told that and they believed it. As i did. Not anymore ...
    Some may have guessed what I am talking about, but anyway, I will mention the book, at the end of this helpful spiel, from which I got all this information and was the main factor in quitting smoking.
  2. Make the decision to quit smoking and get ready
    When you 100% decide to do something, it definitely happens.
    I also stopped drinking. And it wasn't difficult. I left both within a week of each other. And FYI, I hit him harder than anyone.
    As an aside, it's easier to quit smoking and drinking at the same time, rather than one of them at a time, or just one of them.

The right frame of mind is that you are not giving up something ... as if it is sad that it is no longer there, or that it is gone ...
It is leaving what you hate, which is ruining your life and killing you, and has no benefit.
You are embarking on the next beautiful phase of your life without the chains of those things that you do that you do not like.

If you are counting your days, as if one day is fine because enough has passed, you are doing it the hard way.
The willpower method is horrible.

Yes, nicotine is addictive, we all know that. It will take a little over 3 weeks for the nicotine to completely leave your body and dispel all the cravings.
Those 3 weeks are full of excitement.
Trust me. I did it.

Read 'Alan Carr - The Easy Way To Quit Smoking' and if someone tells you it doesn't work, then you didn't read it or follow the instructions. It may even take more than one reading of the book, although when you read it, you will understand everything I have mentioned.

The book will cost you less than 20 fags !!

Go for it.
I did it. You will too. It is a fact with this book.

PS By the way, I'm not on commission!
This book is something that big companies, including vaporizer makers, who are mostly cigarette makers, don't want anyone to know. And it's a book that doctors don't talk about much either ... I wonder why.

Wait for your freedom and feel it right now, knowing that it is final.

First of all, congratulations on not smoking for four days! That is not a minor achievement from my perspective.

Nicotine is one of the most difficult drugs to remove from your system and no, the peak of discomfort may not be over or go away for quite some time. The advantage of not smoking right now is the fact that your lungs are getting closer to normal than ever and that started the first hour you quit.

Nicotine is a killer drug and can haunt you over and over again just like crack, heroin, and methamphetamine. What you got

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First of all, congratulations on not smoking for four days! That is not a minor achievement from my perspective.

Nicotine is one of the most difficult drugs to remove from your system and no, the peak of discomfort may not be over or go away for quite some time. The advantage of not smoking right now is the fact that your lungs are getting closer to normal than ever and that started the first hour you quit.

Nicotine is a killer drug and can haunt you over and over again just like crack, heroin, and methamphetamine. What you have to do is not take that cigarette, whatever happens, to get this out of your system. I know it's hard. My husband did everything he could to quit smoking and he never could. In the end, he lost his uphill battle to quit smoking. Please do whatever it takes to stay smoke-free. Your life really depends on it.

It is not easy to quit smoking. But it will never be easier to do than when you started four days ago, so keep going.

Take 30 days and the acute phase will gradually subside and pass.

Actually, that's when that happens is when you think (wrongly) that you can now have just one and handle it. Don't fool yourself. Don't get addicted!

Stay busy and move on. I went suddenly 22 years ago and I am very glad I did it for my health.

Congratulations on the four lost days! Is not easy, but is worth it.

I think so. Congratulations. Now is the trial period. There will be many temptations such as friends, parties, some other stresses that will drive you to turn on once, etc. Waiting. You will succeed.

Best of luck.

3 days, 22 hours and counting. TIC Tac. TIC Tac. It is hell.

I read all the literature. I got myself ready. I chose what seemed like the most reasonable way to do it, suggested years ago by a good friend: a heavy smoker in his day and a very intelligent, but most importantly, rational person. Much worse people than me have successfully quit smoking. One pack a day, 60 a day, 100 a day, all people have supposedly managed to quit smoking, so what the heck am I complaining about with my meager 10 a day from over 19 years of experience.

I just want to smoke a cigarette.

I grab another peanut. And a

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3 days, 22 hours and counting. TIC Tac. TIC Tac. It is hell.

I read all the literature. I got myself ready. I chose what seemed like the most reasonable way to do it, suggested years ago by a good friend: a heavy smoker in his day and a very intelligent, but most importantly, rational person. Much worse people than me have successfully quit smoking. One pack a day, 60 a day, 100 a day, all people have supposedly managed to quit smoking, so what the heck am I complaining about with my meager 10 a day from over 19 years of experience.

I just want to smoke a cigarette.

I grab another peanut. And other. And then he pushes a whole handful; a desperate attempt to quit smoking and create some activity for my mouth. I don't even want all that coffee, candy, and food that I'm trying to drown this process in.

I just want that disgusting taste to creep down my throat. Inhale Exhale.

They told me there would be benefits. You will feel amazing. You will have a lot of energy. Food will taste so much better. Your sense of smell will be excellent. You will have all that extra money. Well fuck me on the side, but so far, I'm extremely stressed, trying to pretend like I'm fine at work just to get through the day, while by the time I get home, I've run out of juice for that to happen. My husband just got the shorter end of the stick with a hysterical cry out of nowhere, downright evil sarcasm (but damn, so high quality), endless random spiel about nothing, and bottles upon bottles of red wine that seem to disappear In a blink of an eye. of an eye. I'm tired and horny, restless and listless all at the same time and it's exhausting. Food tastes exactly the same.

Just one cigarette. Just a couple of minutes.

And money? All that extra money? Oh puuh-leeease! I went shopping at Amazon. I don't even like shopping, but it gave me something to do for a while and now, something to look forward to. I just got the Bad Motherfucker wallet, you know, the one from Pulp Fiction. The Rick and Morty board game should arrive in a few days and the vintage '50s style dress just shipped this morning. 20 days to go. I buy sandwiches, candy, and gum. He never used to eat sandwiches and always preferred good cheese to stupid candy. Jesus Christ, what have I become ?!

It is always there. The desire, the need, the want. I want to smoke. I don't want to smoke

It's worth it? Is this worth doing to me right now for the bottom line? I know I'm supposed to be thinking "Yes, I'm free" instead of "Ahh, I miss it", but fuck it, all you stupid self-help books. That "Yay" thing is great on paper and all, but I hate that condescending shit so much that it makes me want to spew acid sarcasm all over the face of anyone who tries to sell me that, no matter how good their intentions are. Yes, my reserves of empathy and reason are extremely low right now. No matter how hard I try to convince my mind to think “Yay” about this whole situation, the little voice in the back of my head still says “Pffft, listen to yourself now. You sound ridiculous. Pathetic. You know you long for it, so why lie to yourself? At least take your balls and admit it.

Blew it. Blew it. Blew it.

8 out of 10 cats helps the countdown a bit. At least it takes my mind off cigarettes for a few brief moments: Jimmy's stupid cackle or Jon's familiar cleanliness or Rachel's amazing brain. The toughest problems in Excel work too. Getting a manicure works, but I don't like it. But most of all, I spend my day trying hard to think of thoughts other than the ones that are imposed on me. That is constantly there, tingling in the back of my head, repeating over and over the same discussion, the same theme. It's supposed to get better after a while, right? When? When is it going to be better?!? When can I get my mind back

Cigarettes Cloud of smoke. Inhale. Brittle ash. Ashtray. Give it a tap. Red lighter. Tobacco crumbs. Of smoking.

Shit. Leave me alone now.

I quit smoking about a year ago and I can say that I definitely feel much better.

I smoked for about 9 years, 1-2 packs a day, so the difference I feel may depend on how much I smoke, but for me it has been a huge difference ...

My sense of smell has returned, in fact now I can smell cigarette smoke on other people and it only smells generally.

You may be able to run more than a mile again a few months after you quit smoking. To be fair, I never had the best wind, but when I was smoking I couldn't run 100 yards without feeling out of breath. I started jogging with my wife and in a few months I was over a mile without

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I quit smoking about a year ago and I can say that I definitely feel much better.

I smoked for about 9 years, 1-2 packs a day, so the difference I feel may depend on how much I smoke, but for me it has been a huge difference ...

My sense of smell has returned, in fact now I can smell cigarette smoke on other people and it only smells generally.

You may be able to run more than a mile again a few months after you quit smoking. To be fair, I never had the best wind, but when I was smoking I couldn't run 100 yards without feeling out of breath. I started jogging with my wife and in a few months I was over a mile without feeling like I was going to die ... or that I needed to smoke.

I gained weight. Yeah, this one isn't cool ... smoking really kept my appetite in check. Between going from being single to cooking for my wife and quitting smoking, I started to gain a few pounds. However, it is my fault for not compensating with more exercise.

It was almost like receiving a raise. Sure, I wasn't making any more money, but a pack a day, at the very least, at (low ball average here) $ 8 / pack was basically paying $ 240 + / mo to commit very slow suicide.

I smell better and so does my house. Yes, smokers are not bothered by the smell of smoke on them and on their clothes. Some even like the smell. Other people who don't smoke generally think you suck.

I'm not going to lie, sometimes I miss smoking, I can even buy a hookah or something as a substitute and use it a few times a year as a gift (laughs). There are times when I pass a smoking area and I really have to push myself to keep walking. That said, I will never go back. Having felt the difference and having watched my father die slowly and horribly from smoking-related illnesses… I think I'm fine without cigarettes. When it really comes down to it, I only think of my daughter. I don't want this sweet little girl to have to go through what I did with my father.

I used to smoke. I left the turkey cold several times. The way I finally quit was by weaning myself.

That is why I usually smoked about 15 cigarettes a day. To quit smoking, I would smoke 3 less, therefore 12 instead and spaced every hour or at certain times of the day on a schedule. I would do that for 5 days. (12 cigarettes a day for 5 days).

And then I would lower it 2 more. Up to 10 cigarettes for 4 days (10 cigarettes a day for 4 days),

and then for the next 3 days, I would consume 7 cigarettes a day (7 cigarettes a day for 3 days).

The next 3 days I would reduce it to 6, and the next 3 days to 5 cigarettes, a

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I used to smoke. I left the turkey cold several times. The way I finally quit was by weaning myself.

That is why I usually smoked about 15 cigarettes a day. To quit smoking, I would smoke 3 less, therefore 12 instead and spaced every hour or at certain times of the day on a schedule. I would do that for 5 days. (12 cigarettes a day for 5 days).

And then I would lower it 2 more. Up to 10 cigarettes for 4 days (10 cigarettes a day for 4 days),

and then for the next 3 days, I would consume 7 cigarettes a day (7 cigarettes a day for 3 days).

The next 3 days I reduced it to 6, and the next 3 days to 5 cigarettes, and so on until I smoked 2 cigarettes a day (2 cigarettes a day for 3 days).

And then I smoked 1 cigarette for a day and then I quit (I smoked only 1 cigarette the day after the next 3 day cycle instead of the full 3 days). And I haven't smoked a cigarette since. It took me less than a month to quit. That was 5 years ago.

If there are people smoking around you, it will be difficult to fight the craving, initially that is.

Now when I see people smoking, I feel a slight craving (memories), but it is easy to fight the craving without any problem.

If you use this method of weaning, if you start to crave more cigarettes, just eat something else that you enjoy. Maybe beef jerky, or chew gum, enjoy something else. Just remember that you have the power. You have your own willpower and the strength to fight it. And once you fight the urge to smoke, you'll feel great in the next few minutes or at the end of the day knowing that you've reached your goal and that you've been able to fight it. And it will be much easier next time.

Using the weaning method is much easier to combat cravings. Because little by little you are getting rid of nicotine addiction. And your body adapts every time you consume fewer cigarettes. Just make sure you have a schedule for when you want to smoke, what you have left for that day, or keep track of how many you've smoked and what's left for the day.

So if "cold turkey" doesn't work for you, I recommend the weaning method. Like I said, I left the turkey cold a few times, because it didn't work out for me personally. But the weaning method worked, I only did it once.

I know this was not an answer to your question specifically, but I felt the need to share it with you because if cold turkey doesn't help, I think this method will.

It is definitely not as healthy as quitting all at once. But in my experience, it is more of a guarantee of working long term.

Also another tip: I was also chewing tobacco, so I already stopped, but I was tempted to do it again after I quit smoking, so I got really creative. I used tea leaves and put them on my lip and it tasted terrible but I still did it. And it helped.

If I was initially tempted to smoke while I was still weaning; I would put a cigarette in my mouth, but I wouldn't light it. However, he inhaled a little on the unlit cigarette and put it down again. And that helped. He didn't smoke more cigarettes than he was supposed to, but he kept them in his mouth as if he were.

You have to be creative. Some of the ideas I came up with sound stupid and ridiculous, but you know, like I said, it worked. If you are tempted even now to quit abruptly, just do things in a creative way that satisfies you, but without cheating or not going back to what you are trying to stop.

If you made it that far, it's great. This was a lot longer than I thought. I'm sorry I didn't answer your question, but I hope this helps you or anyone else who has taken the time to read this.

You feel like you hate yourself a little less, or a lot less, depending on how much you hated yourself to begin with.

He finds it hard to believe that an hour, a day, a week, whatever, has passed without smoking, but he is pretty sure that he will probably go back to smoking. Just like you have done before, over and over again.

You don't admit this to anyone.

You start to notice smells, positive and negative. If you have a cat, you notice that you really need to change that cat litter more. If you have a puppy you will find out where it has been marking all this time. On the contrary, it smells like soap in the shower and

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You feel like you hate yourself a little less, or a lot less, depending on how much you hated yourself to begin with.

He finds it hard to believe that an hour, a day, a week, whatever, has passed without smoking, but he is pretty sure that he will probably go back to smoking. Just like you have done before, over and over again.

You don't admit this to anyone.

You start to notice smells, positive and negative. If you have a cat, you notice that you really need to change that cat litter more. If you have a puppy you will find out where it has been marking all this time. On the contrary, it smells like soap in the shower and soap on other people.

Start calculating how much money you have saved so far. If you're typical, you find a way to spend that on something that might not be so healthy.

You swear you'll never become one of those nasty, critical ex-smokers. But if you quit smoking long enough, you find that you have less and less patience with friends who just want to run off and smoke during this great story you were telling ...

If you drink too much or get too high, you'll probably say "Fuck it" and go back to smoking. But if you don't hate yourself too much, you might be able to lie to yourself the next day and tell yourself that the little relapse doesn't really count.

If you gain a little weight, you'll be surprised how quickly you'll lose it again if you just cut back on alcohol as a way to stop smoking again.

You feel less guilty.

You also feel less connected to some people you've been out at work or out of restaurants with, talking and smoking.

Your lover, who hated smoking, will wistfully mention how he "used to take breaks." You start to suspect that he or she actually just liked having something to complain about. Maybe you are right.

You can start over.

If you do, quitting again will be easier, not harder, because quitting, even for a while, will ruin your future smoker forever.

Here's the medical liability waiver. I am not a doctor. I can't recommend anything to you or really predict your behavior. I speak only as a writer, and only from my own experience.

... it's been (thankfully) a while since I've been a slave to nicotine, so I may be a little out of place here ...

... From what I remember, mentally, EVERYONE was an ass for the First week or so and then I started to think that maybe I would let them all live in their place ...

… I smoked when I wanted, so I took between one and three packs a day and had a bit of a nagging “wet” cough Most of the time… Especially when I first woke up…

… I quit smoking on the first day of winter, so until spring I didn't do much physical activity other than shoveling snow around the house and I didn't notice any real change other than the coughing up.

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... it's been (thankfully) a while since I've been a slave to nicotine, so I may be a little out of place here ...

... From what I remember, mentally, EVERYONE was an ass for the First week or so and then I started to think that maybe I would let them all live in their place ...

… I smoked when I wanted, so I took between one and three packs a day and had a bit of a nagging “wet” cough Most of the time… Especially when I first woke up…

... I left the first day of winter, so until spring I did not do any physical activity other than shoveling snow in the house and did not notice any real change other than that cough that almost completely vanished in the spring ~ which I think It is Normal as long as you are not already ill with cancer or COPD ...

... The first REAL notice I got was when I was walking up the long hill to the Crystal Digging site in the spring ...

... Normally, the first day sucked ...

... Carrying fifty pounds or more of tools, steel, and hammers up a very steep incline after sitting all winter was never easy ...

... There was a point about a hundred meters from the bottom that was usually a first goal, as it had a little shelf where you could relieve your burning lungs and place tools without them falling down the hill, so, like always, tense to get there ...

... I looked up a couple of times while climbing and then lowered my head and gave it my all, headed for the Spot ...

... Suddenly I realized that my legs were screaming at me to rest ... "Oh great", I thought, "Stop smoking and now my legs are going away" ...

... Then I looked up to see how far from the Spot ... It wasn't Up ...

... The stain was down ... Way down ... I had gone and kept going not until my lungs were exhausted, but when my legs were tired ...

... Long before I ran out of breath and had to stop ...

…For the first time…

... He made me a believer right then and there ...

... Inhaling burning tobacco smoke is terrible to breathe ...

… It may have taken you a long time to reach your level of health with tobacco, so please be patient when it is time to heal from its sad effects on your general well-being…

... Worth the effort ...

…Good luck!…

I was introduced to smoking at an early age. Growing up in St. Lucia, we spend 4 weeks every year on a small island called Rat Island (due to its shape, there were no rodents there). My family rented it for 1 week every Easter and a family friend, we called him Uncle Victor, rented it for 3 weeks every August.

Uncle Victor was a co-owner and manager of a local cigarette factory and was a tough guy, drinker, cursed, and chain smoker. Every August since I was a little boy, the Island of Rats was something we looked forward to. Our parents amazingly all let the children pack our clothes

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I was introduced to smoking at an early age. Growing up in St. Lucia, we spend 4 weeks every year on a small island called Rat Island (due to its shape, there were no rodents there). My family rented it for 1 week every Easter and a family friend, we called him Uncle Victor, rented it for 3 weeks every August.

Uncle Victor was a co-owner and manager of a local cigarette factory and was a tough guy, drinker, cursed, and chain smoker. Every August since I was a little boy, the Island of Rats was something we looked forward to. Our parents amazingly all let us pack our clothes, our swimming gear and our fishing gear and basically live for 3 weeks on this little island with Victor as the patriarch and absolute ruler. I say amazingly because Victor was the most irreverent man who has ever walked the planet. He got drunk with a red face at every party and cursed with colors anyone who pissed him off, be it the host of the event, the parish priest or the Prime Minister himself (small country, everyone knows everyone). Nevertheless,

We were a good mix of boys and girls, all between the ages of 4 and 5, and we had great adventures growing and developing together every summer on the island of rats. The stories are too numerous to tell, but suffice it to say that, in addition to some basic rules, mainly obeys Uncle Victor, we did what we wanted.

We drank beer and smoked openly since we were 12 years old. Victor would scold us for stealing his alcohol, but he didn't care if we smoked and although my parents never allowed us to smoke at home, we continued for the rest of the year when we went out after school and on weekends. When I was a young adult, I chain-smoked every night to the point where I only needed one lighter for my first cigarette and lit all subsequent ones with the butt of the previous one.

Fast forward to December 1999. He had returned to the Caribbean after living and working in the oil fields of northern Alberta for 17 years. He was a freelance photographer and graphic designer and was in Barbados supervising the printing of a sexy annual calendar for a large Saint Lucia rum distillery. It was close to midnight and I was in the hotel bar when I looked at my reflection in the huge mirrored backdrop. The first thing I noticed was the large ashtray in front of me full of unlit cigarette butts. Of course, I also had a lit Benson & Hedges dangling between the index and middle fingers of my left hand. I have always been an avid tennis player and at 38 I was beginning to feel out of breath in long singles matches. I knew cigarettes were to blame But like most smokers, he had put off and put off cutting back for years. However, something clicked this time and I made an impulsive decision to finish the pack I had and never smoke again.

I had 5 left and after they finished, I never put another one to my lips. What I learned after I quit smoking was that my addiction to cigarettes was more of a physical and emotional thing than a chemical dependence on nicotine. The hardest thing was finding something to do with my left hand when I was socializing. Holding and smoking a cigarette had become such an integral part of me that I gestured, paused to inhale and blow smoke so automatically that I felt lost without that aspect of my activity.

As for maintaining my resolve, I simply focused on all the negatives that I was already aware of; the smell on my clothes, the stained skin on my fingers, the fear of cancer, and the perceptible impact on my tennis game. 20 years later, my psychological self-conditioning is ingrained to the point that I even find it a bit disgusting to see actors smoking in movies and on television. My tennis game is better than ever and my loving wife, who has never smoked, is a recent survivor of inflammatory breast cancer. Life is never perfect, but it can be very good if you give yourself and yourself a chance.

Definitely before and during those 3 days.

I have been trying to quit smoking since the beginning of this year. May 5th was my quit date because that was the day I started smoking again after quitting last year in March (2 months… hey, thanks for playing). 1 year again ... and it's horrible morning sickness ... and it was supposed to end.

It's July 2 and I'm still smoking. Officially 14 years old.

18 year old unofficial smoker (occasionally when I was young - smoker for 3 years in college, I quit smoking for 3 years ... in 2005 I lit up again).

Every month I have tried to quit smoking.

My last attempt was 2 weeks ago.

“I only need 3 days!

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Definitely before and during those 3 days.

I have been trying to quit smoking since the beginning of this year. May 5th was my quit date because that was the day I started smoking again after quitting last year in March (2 months… hey, thanks for playing). 1 year again ... and it's horrible morning sickness ... and it was supposed to end.

It's July 2 and I'm still smoking. Officially 14 years old.

18 year old unofficial smoker (occasionally when I was young - smoker for 3 years in college, I quit smoking for 3 years ... in 2005 I lit up again).

Every month I have tried to quit smoking.

My last attempt was 2 weeks ago.

“I only need 3 days! If I can get through days 1 and 2, we're fine. I will smoke my last cigarette this Thursday; I will sleep most of the day on Friday and the same on Saturday; Sunday will be easy and on Monday I will be smoke-free ”, is what I thought every month. I have told my husband this exact plan. It worked last year.

There are many tips on how to quit smoking gently. One of the ways is to reduce the number of cigarettes you smoke on a daily basis. A doctor once told my husband that 5 cigarettes a day won't hurt you (I call it shit!). I found that forcibly reducing my daily intake didn't work and created more anxiety than I (naturally) aroused. For example, let's say I smoke 14 cigarettes today. Tomorrow my goal would be to smoke 13, then 12 the next day, and keep counting until I hit zero on the day to quit.

I couldn't handle 7 cigarettes in 16 hours. Understand that I smoke about 14 cigarettes a day, sometimes (many times) less than that (and sometimes the entire pack). From 10 to 14 a day, I admit that it is normal for me. Forcing me to smoke just 7 was hard. This meant that he had to plan for them. He couldn't just smoke when he wanted to. This backfired for me - if not only had I brought 7 cigarettes to work I probably would have smoked 5 without thinking about them, but now I've smoked all 7 and gone to the store to buy a new pack before. I'm going home. I did this one day two weeks ago and left half a pack of cigarettes at home just to buy a new pack at lunch because I ran out of allotted amount for the day. The anxiety of not having those cigarettes when I wanted them was so strong.

Lately, I always have the urge to quit when ... um ... "Aunt Flo" comes to the center for her monthly blood drive appointments throughout the week. The increase in hormones makes cigarettes taste unpleasant and makes me fatigued after smoking. This scenario is always dangerous because the irritability that comes with PMS is mixed with the irritability experienced from nicotine withdrawal.

Needless to say, my husband is warned in advance.

He is also a smoker. It also doesn't make it easy for me to quit smoking. He overreacts to my irritable outbursts from nicotine withdrawal instead of being understanding and realizing that the outburst is not about him or directed at him. It's about "survival" and the feeling that I'm going to die or hit a squishy baby IF I DON'T GET A DAMN GOD CIGARETTE! His angry reactions annoy me more and now I have a strong urge to smoke (and I break down and buy a pack of cigarettes because I'm shaking with anxiety and anger, the feeling that nicotine calms in a smoker). I finally had to yell at him to stop reacting to my inability to control the anger and irritability I feel because I CAN'T HAVE A CIGARETTE! Fuck, it pisses me off writing that!

Then day 1 arrives and all you have to do is think about not smoking. Or smoking. Or how you want to smoke, but it's not really like that. You mentally list the reasons why you are quitting and say, "Yeah, remember that ... that's why we don't need a cigarette." You can no longer smoke. That deal is off the table. Do not do it. Do not even think about it. Okay, think about it, but just ... like ... don't leave the house. If you leave the house, you are likely to stop smoking cigarettes. Especially if someone or something pisses you off. And they do or they will.

About 4 hours after you wake up, your head starts to hurt because you haven't smoked. It's not a typical headache ... it's more like constant pressure on the frontal lobe. You have a frown on your forehead all day like you are thinking a lot about something or if you are angry at the sun because it is shining. There is no middle ground.

You start yawning every 5 fucking minutes. And you are bored. Really boring. That level of boredom where you would like to smoke a cigarette to have something to do. * yawn * Now you're thinking of smoking again. * yawn * Or not smoke. * yawn * And you go over the list of reasons you're quitting again. Convince yourself this time * yawn * that it is the right thing to * yawn * to do. To resist. You are stronger than this addiction. * yawn * Now you understand addiction - * yawn * is tied to your neurons and survival hormones * yawn * like food and water, so even though * yawn * it feels like we're going to * yawn * die off nicotine, * yawn * we're not really going to do it. * yawn * You start to feel like * yawn * ... Damn, can I stop yawning for a damn second?

Well now the pressure has built up more in your head and now you are tired. Fatigued with everything you do or don't do. Tired just sitting there. You are so bored that you want to get up and do something, but you can't because you are tired. Do you want to smoke. No, you don't. So you take a nap because if you don't go to sleep now, damn it, you go to the store to buy a pack of cigarettes. You have a heavy head and your eyes thank you. In 1 to 3 hours later, you will wake up and start coughing. You will want to smoke a cigarette, as you normally would when waking up from a nap. But wait, you can't. You are now a non-smoker, remember?

Welcome to a new level of hell.

This is where you: You still have a headache, you still feel irritable and now groggy, you still want a cigarette, you have to eat something even though you have no appetite, and you start to get mad at yourself for not being able to do simple tasks, especially some . how to think and speak. Oh, and you have dropsy and / or butter fingers. You will drop everything you pick up and / or things will slip out of your hands when you pick them up; Both of these things will piss you off tremendously. You start throwing shit and you have tantrums because everything is stupid. Stupid ideas. Stupid designs. Stupid instructions. You complain or complain about those things for the next hour.

Also, there's a lot of crying if you're a girl ... you know, just because. Crying because you are angry. Cry because you are angry and you don't want to be angry. Cry because you have a headache and you don't want a headache and cry because it doesn't go away. Crying because you can't smoke a cigarette and you really want one! Crying because you heard the song You can't always get what you want. Crying because you're constipated because you have to smoke your morning cigarette to stimulate your ... okay, I went a bit far with that one, but you get the idea. You don't get what you want, so you become a 4-year-old who wants a Barbie, but your parents won't buy it for you today ... that doesn't mean you'll never get it. That Barbie, you might have to wait till your birthday in 2 weeks but they are not buying it today. At this time.

And no, you can't smoke a cigarette either. Deal with it.

This is where irritability peaks and turns into frustration. You hate it, you're mad, you can't smoke, who cares ?! There is nothing you can do about it now. If… EVEN IF… you smoke now, it won't change anything. You will continue to have a headache, you will remain angry or irritable for the rest of the day, only now you are angry with yourself because you are not strong enough to resist the known and you are prepared for withdrawal. symptom. Willpower and self-discipline are a motherfucker to deal with right now.

One of my biggest frustrations when quitting smoking is a lack of focus or concentration and an inability to think and speak for 3 days. This is when you become a dementia patient who can't remember words and a three-year-old who can't put together a proper sentence. Good luck trying to say something without muttering or sounding like an angry jerk.

Seriously ask me where do I want the shampoo and I can't even find the word 'Shower' but I will describe it with,

"It goes to the ... the ... that way ... to the other room over there ... where ... just put it in the ... the, the ... THAT DAMN PLACE WHERE THE WATER! GET OUT OF THE WALL! "

"The shower?"

“Yeah, THAT damn word I was trying to say! SHAO-WERE! Anyway, why the hell are you asking me where the damn shampoo goes? He always goes to the shower. Where the hell would I go? "

I'mws ... I was just wondering if ... it doesn't matter.

Every situation is aggravated by your frustration with yourself. Others do not understand what it feels like to be a frustrated intelligent person who cannot think or speak; it's like the people who describe being awake on an operating table; you know what to say, how to say it, you want to say that, but physically you can't.

Day 2 is a repeat of Day 1, including the understanding that anger and irritability are just part of the deal. Add to that that you are so fucking sick of feeling this way, you just want it to stop. But it won't stop. There is no relief from symptoms. Especially this damn headache! If the pressure just ... my temples ... are they expanding and contracting? It feels like my brain is expanding and contracting with every breath. Also, everyone should shut up, leave you alone, and turn down the damn music. In fact, turn it off. You don't like music or anything anymore. Oh, and now you're hungry because you didn't really eat anything the day before, nor do you want today because the "food" doesn't sound good, doesn't taste good, or you just can't eat. Sugar and caffeine are your only remedies for this.

I don't know what day 3 will be like since I never make it to a Sunday. By Saturday afternoon, I bought a pack of cigarettes because either I got sick of this shit or my husband pissed me off. This is only a fraction of my experience before and during those 3 damn days.

As for after getting over those 3 days, as I did a year ago, the hardest part is not getting carried away with smoking in the future. I could smell cigarette smoke and it was totally fine. In fact, it smelled horrible and it was excruciating to be around. I vaped but not much. My breathing was better. He was no longer coughing in the morning. I could smell things that used to go unnoticed and things tasted different, neé better. All of that was fucking amazing! I look forward to all of that again!

However, there were moments big and small when I missed smoking:

  1. Watching someone else smoke and looking good doing it. It sounds stupid, but I'm an 80s baby so I grew up with Joe Cool, the Marlboro Man, and the happy couple from Newport cigarette ads. Smoking on TV / movies was a common practice and if you were a cool or badass character, you were a smoker;
  2. Driving or seeing someone smoking while driving; Motorcycling also triggers this, as every time you stop and get off you smoke or smoke a cigarette. Now you just stand there with nothing to do;
  3. Post sex cigarettes. What the fuck do non-smokers do after sex? No, I don't want to hug or talk to the pillow ... we're done here. Is it time to ... watch TV again? It feels weird not smoking after sex (unless you're a marijuana smoker, in that case, at least you have something to smoke after sex…);
  4. During or after functions / reunions / family gatherings where alcohol is needed / needed (this is what got me started over last year - I got mad at a cousin and needed to drink and smoke when I got home);
  5. oh yeah ... drinking. Drinking is the biggest trigger for any smoker who drinks. I feel like I can't breathe if I don't have a cigarette when I drink; I physically feel my chest sinking. Marijuana did this to me too, but I've gotten used to not smoking a cigarette immediately after smoking a bowl. , joints, dab, etc.

Here’s the worst part about it, and why I say it’s hardest before & during the 3 days: I honestly, truly, & desperately want to quit smoking. I’m ready to quit smoking. I know that I have to quit smoking. I believe I can quit smoking. But all that shit I described up there is just too much bullshit to fucking go through for me to put down that fucking cancer stick. I can’t take Chantix. Wellbutrin doesn’t work for me. NRT sucks and just makes me want to smoke instead. Cold turkey is the only way I can achieve it, and in order to do so, I have to go through the bullshit withdrawal symptoms and their side effects...and cater to my husband’s fragile fucking needs during that time as well.

I’m stuck in cognitive dissonance. I know smoking is bad and causing a lot of health problems, but I continue to do it. I know that quitting smoking will aide in relieving those health problems, yet I continue to poison myself. The dilemma I have is I’m not sure which is the worst experience: the morning sickness of a smoker that struggles to breathe between violent, phlegm producing coughs every morning or 3 days of nicotine withdrawal. I’m sure you have figured out which side is winning this battle.

I have been a smoker for over a decade and I have quit completely. There are different strategies which work for different people. I have listed best methods and strategies for it with my research and practical experiences.

One day I thought of this idea, but never had the courage to commit to it. My influence was to promise my mom that I would quit the addiction to smoking. One day my mom and I were watching a movie together and to my surprise the actor was found to have lung cancer from smoking, my mom looked at me concerned while the dramatic scene in the movie was still on. I thought to myself th

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I have been a smoker for over a decade and I quit completely. There are different strategies that work for different people. I have listed the best methods and strategies for this with my research and practical experiences.

I thought of this idea one day but never had the courage to commit on it. My leverage was to promise my mom I would quit the addiction of smoking. One day me and my mom were watching a movie together and to my surprise the actor gets detected with lung cancer for smoking, my mom looked at me concerned while the dramatic scene in the movie was still on. I thought to myself this is it, Im gonna make the promise :)

So here I have deep attachment and love for my mom and a promise to her has to be restored. I held her hand and looked her in the eye and said Im done with this habit and consider I have quit. I did this on purpose, as I tried different ways to quit and it just didnt happen. With the love I have for my mom I would never break the promise. Well every person is different and you need to find your strategy and what gives you leverage.

How to Quit by tricking your brain?

As mentioned to quit smoking is simple but not easy. The magic lies within your mind. You just need that mind-set shift for this change. You need to have leverage on your decision. It is always easier to fast than to diet. Same goes with smoking, it’s easier to quit smoking at once than reducing or telling yourself I will smoke only a couple of them every day. Trust me that doesn’t work, one day you would end up covering for the whole week and you are back to square one. If you manage to quit smoking for 21 days it is practically out of your system and you can do it for lifetime.

1. Reason “Why”?:

For this you need a strong “Why”. “Why you are going to quit? “ Until you don’t have a strong answer to this with strong emotions it cannot be accomplished. The next time you feel like smoking try to be conscious about what you feel. If you had a severe chest pain today and the doctor told you “If you don’t quit you will die in a year”. There is a 95% probability you will quit that very moment. It is that jolt of fear that can trigger massive changes. Often only when we are at gun point we take strong actions. You can have strong emotions attached, for the reasons you should not be smoking. You could think of all the damage it would do to your body or think about the tonne of money you spent on smoking over the years and how much more you could save, you could think about the well-being of your kids or your family and quit. You need to find a very strong reason. Each one of us can be triggered with a different “Why”. You just need to find yours.

2. Reprogram and Rewire your brain:

Think of all the times you have not been smoking. May be you are at your relatives place, or at your families place or at a movie or at a 20 hr long flight or at any place where you are not allowed to smoke. You have done it in the past and you can do it again. Your brain accepted these places as a “must not smoke” place and it was easy on you. Now each time you feel like smoking you are replacing it with a memory of a must not smoke condition. When you say “I should not smoke” it is still at your convenience, but when you say “I must not smoke” it is with certainty. You need to get your emotions to this level of where it is a “Must” and not a “Should”. Some people swore to their wives/girlfriends they would never smoke and they were out of it. In this case their love and emotions towards their wife/girlfriends were so strong that it gave them the mental vitality to do so. Some took an oath to their gym instructors, some with their parents, some with their friends and so on. It can actually be quite easy when you have an accountability partner. Some have even done it by committing to all the people on Social media, so this had to make them stand by their commitment. The point is whatever that can drive you to achieve, you need to use that strategy.

3. Changing your Environment:

Research says that around smokers even non-smokers become smokers. So if you are trying to quit you might want to keep yourself distant from smokers at-least when they are smoking.

4. Tobacco Supply:

If you are stocked with supply and if tobacco is around you or with you all the time, you are going to be tempted to smoke. Keep no supplies of tobacco with you. Use the lock-down in your favor to quit.

5. Step by Step Approach:

Don’t make it look big that you are quitting smoking for ever. Your mind will give you a 100 reasons to smoke and that you can’t quit smoking. Start by taking 1 day at a time. Quitting smoking can have withdrawal symptoms like headache, anxiety, stress, intense cravings for nicotine, hunger, etc after 3 days. However you need to convince yourself to manage not smoking just one day at a time. So when you feel like smoking replace it with something empowering like may be eating or drinking something instead. Initially when you are breaking that pattern you will feel uncomfortable but you need to remind yourself your reason “Why you are going to quit?”. The next day you repeat the same process. You only have to take one day at a time.

Alternate therapies:

So there are a whole list of natural activities besides smoking which will help you experience dopamine in your brain.

Exercise: When you work out or do exercise you start becoming more thoughtful about your body. Also your brain releases Endorphins or dopamine or Serotonin depending on your exercise.

Food which is rich in Tyrosine: Foods like Almonds, eggs, fish, chicken, avocados, bananas, beans help creating dopamine in your body.

Music: Listening to calm and relaxing music can help you increase dopamine levels.

Meditation: Meditation can help you with focus and concentration with increased levels in dopamine. There are thousands of researches conducted on the amazing benefits of meditation for your brain and your overall well-being.

Getting a massage: When you are relaxed the dopamine levels automatically go up. Research says that a massage can reduce your stress by reducing cortisol (stress hormone) levels and increase in dopamine levels by 30%.

Sleep: For your brain to naturally produce more dopamine in the brain it needs to get enough sound sleep. Sleep helps all the cells in the body to repair and renew.

Once you quit smoking, your body quickly starts to heal and regain the vitality of a non-smoker. Within days you will see your sensory organs functioning better, your appetite will be much better, oxygen levels in your blood will rise. Give it a month and your lung capacity would have improved. Your skin starts to get more nutrients and you will have a healthier complexion. Your immune system gets better. Hair loss gets reduced. Teeth and your gums have a better life. Eventually your body will regenerate and heal to reach a state of a Non-smoker over a couple of years. Let’s quit today and begin our healing process!

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