I am learning Python. If I don't get any jobs, what do I have to do with Python skills to win?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Channing Holman



I am learning Python. If I don't get any jobs, what do I have to do with Python skills to win?

You will definitely get work after learning Python. Learning Python will offer you countless job opportunities, so you don't have to worry about what to do with your Python skills to win. You will definitely win after learning Python and you will earn a good amount.

Also, your Python skills will never be useless as Python programming can help you develop many other skills as well. Once you can learn data analysis with Python, data science with Python, machine learning with Python, etc.

Below I have shared a video to help you know more about the Python programming language and its importance.

Keep reading

You will definitely get work after learning Python. Learning Python will offer you countless job opportunities, so you don't have to worry about what to do with your Python skills to win. You will definitely win after learning Python and you will earn a good amount.

Also, your Python skills will never be useless as Python programming can help you develop many other skills as well. Once you can learn data analysis with Python, data science with Python, machine learning with Python, etc.

Below, I have shared a video to help you learn more about the Python programming language and its importance in today's life. So, watch this video and know how great it would be to learn Python for your career.

I hope it helped you!

Apply that knowledge to learn that programming language that will give you a job.

Many C / C ++ programmers became Java programmers. If we learn any programming language well, learning another will not require much effort. It is as if you have bought a new car and you will not lose the driving experience you got from the old car. The syntax is like the skin of a fruit and the actual learning is superficial.

Once you are complete with your Python skills, you can try Django or Flask.

You can initially learn Flask as it is easier and then switch to Django. After Django, you can build dynamic web applications as long as you have a basic understanding of HTML, CSS, and then you can test freelance work.

You can work as a freelancer in any of the following domains:

  1. Data visualization and analysis projects (demand is increasing rapidly)
  2. Web scraping projects
  3. Web development projects
  4. Game development projects
  5. Mobile development projects

You will have to learn the relevant Python libraries and frameworks.

You do not need to learn another language. You could, with a bit of luck, work in Python for your entire career without having to learn another language.

But…

I used to work with a couple of people who were RPG programmers and they had been there for their entire career. I never asked, but I guess they were both in their 40s. Role-playing games had served them well throughout their careers until ...

Basically everything they had worked on was being rewritten in a Windows C # .Net application. They gave them to me as part of my team. He was 30 at the time. I hadn't built anything in C # either (this was in 2001–

Keep reading

You do not need to learn another language. You could, with a bit of luck, work in Python for your entire career without having to learn another language.

But…

I used to work with a couple of people who were RPG programmers and they had been there for their entire career. I never asked, but I guess they were both in their 40s. Role-playing games had served them well throughout their careers until ...

Basically everything they had worked on was being rewritten in a Windows C # .Net application. They gave them to me as part of my team. He was 30 at the time. I had never built anything in C # (this was from 2001 to 2002 and hardly anyone had) but I never doubted that I could. Our boss also didn't hesitate and gave me the RPG programmers with the basic directive to see if there is anything you can do with them.

One of them got it right, the other was a pain in my ass. I really feel like it all came down to attitude in the sense that I had decided that I wanted to learn something new. He had decided he really didn't want to. I don't know what he's doing right now, but I'd be surprised if it was software development.

My point with this story is that it is very likely that at some point you will have to know a different language than Python. When that time comes, how are you going to approach it? I gave you three different attitudes in my story:

  • One person decided that he could do it.
  • One person decided they couldn't
  • A person never had the slightest doubt that he could

That last one was me. He had no doubts because he had already learned a lot of languages ​​at that time. More importantly, he had already learned to learn a language.

If you find yourself in the same situation, what person do you want to be?

Programming is not the whole picture, the experience of working within team structures (scrum, etc.), the knowledge of agile methodologies, the list goes on.
I imagine there is a slim chance of getting a freelance job, but the odds are against you.
I participated in a coding boot camp (4 months) and in the end there were a number of young people hiring consultants (freelance experience ... something like that).
I believe that any junior position would provide you with a life experience (I heard from some people within my course who already had good programming skills who became self-employed shortly after their initial junior employment).
Although

Keep reading

Programming is not the whole picture, the experience of working within team structures (scrum, etc.), the knowledge of agile methodologies, the list goes on.
I imagine there is a slim chance of getting a freelance job, but the odds are against you.
I participated in a coding boot camp (4 months) and in the end there were a number of young people hiring consultants (freelance experience ... something like that).
I believe that any junior position would provide you with a life experience (I heard from some people within my course who already had good programming skills who became self-employed shortly after their initial junior employment).
Although my experience is not ML, there will be similarities

There is a perpetual battle between those who say yes and those who don't say who their true friend is, who loves to hear their own voice, and whether the other person is a negative, toxic, blood-sucking, abusive flattering or tyrant who doesn't have friends: just a collection of prisoners trapped in a box of perpetual humiliations always seeking approval, always living to fulfill a codependency.

Let me be frank. If you want to be successful, you will have to learn to defend your right to pursue success. You do not need anyone's permission or approval.

So why seek advice from someone committed to preventing your

Keep reading

There is a perpetual battle between those who say yes and those who don't say who their true friend is, who loves to hear their own voice, and whether the other person is a negative, toxic, blood-sucking, abusive flattering or tyrant who doesn't have friends: just a collection of prisoners trapped in a box of perpetual humiliations always seeking approval, always living to fulfill a codependency.

Let me be frank. If you want to be successful, you will have to learn to defend your right to pursue success. You do not need anyone's permission or approval.

So why ask someone committed to preventing your success for advice?

Identify your passion, your dreams. Is it for programming in Python? Why? Money? So money is your passion and maybe your dream. But why? Buy a house, a car, get out of debt? Travel the world? Give your life to the purpose of a charity to eradicate disease, to help unemployed veterans who had medical benefits stolen? To stop human trafficking? To cure AIDS or cystic fibrosis cancer or MS or MD? To save the souls of millions? Sing or play a musical instrument at Carnegie Hall? Being an actor on NCIS? Play basketball like Michael Jordan?

Consider making a wish list and packing it with the things you want to do. Now make four more empty lists. Identify 1/5 of those items, the ones that don't interest you as much as the others, and then move on to list 4. Do this again by moving them to list 3, and then place half of the remaining items in list 2.

You now have five lists of decreasing value. What do you see on list 1?

Now think of times in your life when you felt like you had just done something amazing, when you accomplished something great, something of great value, and you thought you could easily enjoy doing that every day for the rest of your life.

What I think was different about Martin Luther King is that where others had a complaint and had negativity about what problems could and couldn't be solved, King went to give a speech and ran it through a woman to see what she thought about the dream shortly . before giving a speech if I'm not mistaken. And if I understand correctly, he said something was missing: a dream. Vision. Attention.

If I'm not mistaken, I think MLK modified his speech minutes before giving it and became the one we all remember and cannot forget: I have a dream.

King knew what sleep was like, how it sounded, felt, tasted, smelled. He knew what he expected to see when the dream began to come true. You would see that people value each other for their character and not for the color of their skin.

The world is full of naysayers who would contribute nothing to the world other than killing a million kings by defeating them in dismay, discarding their hopes, denying their dreams, calling those lofty thoughts naive, insincere, or those who say yes to an idiotic lie. . sycophantic hoping to hitch a car to someone great, but willing to abandon the leader when failure comes as "inevitably."

Make it clear to naysayers that you do not want or need their permission or approval and that your true friends will be those who help each other and participate in the success of others. Don't look for friends who just want to glorify themselves by accurately predicting your failure or convincing you to give up your dreams so they can stay in their prisons.

Part of the joy of life is enjoying it. Redundant? Sure. Why not? Sometimes we get caught up in the goal and forget that the path to the goal can be just as important as reaching the goal. Some people get depressed when they fail because they don't realize that failure isn't necessarily final, but is almost always part of the road to success. Those who are successful fail more often. Failure is learning.

Others get depressed when they are successful. Now they have no more goals. You have already reached your goal and finding a new goal means a dramatic change in the direction of life. But a dream can have many goals, a backlog, so to speak. And you can finish wishlist 1, 2 or 3, or none of them. There is no law that says you cannot continue adding to each deposit. And no one says you have to complete each cube before time runs out. The fact that you are living a life with purpose is a great gift.

So your passion is programming in Python? Or is it to gain something by learning Python? An ability to earn money? The pleasure of programming? Years ago, I took Fortran in college and was bored. I hacked into a tutorial and got it to teach me basic programming, math, physics, and other stuff, and I didn't get bored. I also took a COBOL programming course and thoroughly enjoyed it.

So what do you think I did professionally for my first programming job? I programmed in Basic. I worked with a really cool guy named Bill Pardini to build a car financing and leasing system. Spreadsheets hadn't become popular yet, but I had enough experience in math to develop a special program that would allow the user to enter all fields related to a lease or sale except one, and the program would calculate the missing entry. Most required an iteration of Newton-Raphson, which is funny because today, 42 or 43 years later, I understand that no one dared to touch that part of the code but left it as is or almost as is.

Later I became a COBOL programmer with a bit of Fortran in an IBM mainframe environment. Then DB III +, Pascal, etc. Later, I was intrigued by Unix and C and programmed in C on both PC and Unix systems before starting to work on Unix systems. But I also manipulated Prolog, Lisp (writing symbolic math code), Forth, some assemblers, shell scripts, then I got into Perl, C ++, Java, Javascript, various 4GL, SQL and started doing more on related work with the web. and languages ​​plus relational databases and later everything to do with PeopleSoft and Epic and Oracle until I had a trillion things oozing out of my ears.

Verbose. Here, being concise requires verbosity. Why? Paint a picture of curiosity. It's one thing to tell someone that I grew up curious. It's another thing to * show * it. My life proves it.

Part of being a programmer or IT professional is having enough curiosity to keep you learning at a pace that allows you to keep up with technology. Some old, moldy programmers go their own way and lose their curiosity. I am 61 years old and I am still 15 years old in my curiosity.

But not everyone will believe that it is possible without really knowing the people who are.

Are you? Are you perpetually curious? Are you excited to write a program in a new language and see that it works correctly? Do you enjoy rooting out bugs? Do you have a natural tendency to organize programs in ways that are extremely well written and easy to maintain, highly reliable, easy to test, high performance, scalable, resource efficient, conflict free, or consuming resources without freeing them up?

Whether programming is your passion or not, it will be more something you watch than something someone else can grant or deny you.

But understand your dream, your vision, your purpose, your number one list. And don't let any naysayers intimidate or imprison you.

Well, almost everyone will say "yes, you can absolutely learn Python and get a job at 45, if you have skills and knowledge."

But I'll talk about the back where it says ”…. If you have skills and knowledge ”. What people really mean by that is that Python alone won't bring you a job, because Python is just another programming language that helps you turn your thoughts and ideas and solutions to problems into code, which is software.

So the crucial point here is, if you have the required skills and knowledge, then python or java or C, what you choose doesn't matter after all

Keep reading

Well, almost everyone will say "yes, you can absolutely learn Python and get a job at 45, if you have skills and knowledge."

But I'll talk about the back where it says ”…. If you have skills and knowledge ”. What people really mean by that is that Python alone won't bring you a job, because Python is just another programming language that helps you turn your thoughts and ideas and solutions to problems into code, which is software.

So the crucial point here is, if you have the required skills and knowledge then python or java or C, what you choose doesn't matter, after all languages ​​just help you put your ideas into code, nothing more than that .

Read below if you don't know if you have skills and knowledge or not.

Now the skills and knowledge you should have depends on the job you are trying to get into. If you want to be a web developer and you want to learn Python, then you need to know how servers work and how to write and connect backend code with frontend and things like that. So here I would be using Python to write some backend code.

Otherwise, if you want to be a data analyst or data scientist, you have to learn how to perform analysis on data samples, filter them, and in this case, you will use Python to help you accomplish those tasks.

If you want to be a software developer, who only develops applications or a system or a service, then you can learn Python really very well along with a good knowledge about data structures and algorithms, then you can get a job as a Python developer.

Bottom line,

Does learning Python benefit you? Yes

Do you need to have the required skill set and domain knowledge of the job you are applying for? Yes

Coding, a text language used by programmers to instruct the computer to perform a particular function, is an important aspect of any tech talent job. Learning to code is quite essential as it is a logic based problem solving technology that helps us solve various problems with real world impact.

Although it may seem overwhelming, coding is easy to learn and, in fact, anyone with a reasonable knowledge of the technology can code. A strong coding foundation enables coders and the coding ecosystem as it is experiential and offers hands-on work experience. This solution-based system is exit-oriented

Keep reading

Coding, a text language used by programmers to instruct the computer to perform a particular function, is an important aspect of any tech talent job. Learning to code is quite essential as it is a logic based problem solving technology that helps us solve various problems with real world impact.

Although it may seem overwhelming, coding is easy to learn and, in fact, anyone with a reasonable knowledge of the technology can code. A strong coding foundation enables coders and the coding ecosystem as it is experiential and offers hands-on work experience. This solution-based system is results-oriented.

Coding scope

Most companies are shifting from old economy jobs to emerging tech jobs. Since technology will be a part of almost every industry, there is a great need to work on professional skills in the technology space. In an era of fast-paced innovations, both programmers and employees will have to make skill changes and technology investments accordingly.

There is definitely an increase in technology deployment across all industries, but there are several jobs specific to emerging technology that are growing in numbers. According to a Forbes list, the top 10 emerging tech jobs include blockchain developers, machine learning engineers and specialists, application sales executives, and data science specialists.

Lack of skills and knowledge to code correctly

Recent studies suggest that, in India alone, 1.5 million engineers graduate each year, and less than 0.5 percent of them can be directly employed for various IT jobs. This is largely due to a lack of confidence in coding and relevant skill sets, which 31 percent of women and 26 percent of men claimed in a recent internal study.

This was followed by the absence of relevant papers, little time and focus on coding, and an outdated curriculum (reported by an average of 50 percent of the participants). This is where Maker-based learning comes into play.

The Maker concept focuses on practical coding and experiential learning skills as methods to bring aspiring professionals up to speed with current industry demands and standards so that they are ready for the job. This approach will help them find and secure relevant jobs with ease.

When learning based on the Maker concept is combined with mandate-based recruiting, it also creates the optimal solution for aspiring jobs and companies. For aspiring candidates, it is an effective solution to close the skills gap and, simultaneously, companies obtain the best talent tailored to their needs.

Narayan Mahadevan, Founder of the IP-Powered Incubation Lab, BridgeLabz Solutions says: Being in a simulated real-world environment with constant mentoring allows engineering graduates to learn independently. They can overcome a number of different scenarios, as will be required in today's professional environment, and even more so in the future.

Coding is certainly not rocket science, and anyone with an interest in technology can hone their skills to be able to code correctly and thus effectively contribute to the tech ecosystem across industries and functions. If you are interested in coding but you fear the complexity of it.

HERE IS THE LIST OF ORGANIZATIONS THAT TEACHES YOU TO CODE IN THE EASIEST WAY

BridgeLabz - Emphasizing the experiential learning of concepts and ideas, BridgeLabz helps develop real-world experience through hands-on coding and real-time mentoring delivered to engineers new to the emerging technology space. Bank. It has made more than 800 engineers employable to date, over the course of more than 50 Maker Programs, and there has been a 100 percent increase in salary paid to Makers since the inception of the program.

Skillcrush: aims to prepare you for the career you want. Blueprints offered include web designer, web developer, and freelance WordPress developer. It's about empowering all kinds of people of diverse origins, both nationality and gender. While women make up the majority of its student population, roughly 25% of those who take classes online

Codecademy - An online platform with free courses in JavaScript, HTML and CSS, and jQuery. Plus, anyone can create a course and share it with aspiring developers. They also organized Code Year, an initiative to teach more people to code in 2012, and Code Summer +, which teaches coding to disadvantaged youth.

Google Code University - For a more self-directed experience, you can explore Google's library of courses and videos, particularly tutorials and introductions for beginners. You can also check out the Python and C ++ classes taught on Google.

upGrad - upGrad is an online higher education platform that offers rigorous industry-relevant programs designed and delivered in collaboration with world-class professors and industries. By merging the latest technology, pedagogy and services, upGrad is creating an immersive learning experience, anytime, anywhere.

The best to use are startups ... go ahead!

Please rate my answer

Meet Again the question is quite vague and excuse me, who are you? That is the most important point that people forget when looking for work.

If knowledge of Python is such an important thing, why is the company applying for a BE / MCA degree from reputable universities?

Why do parents spend so much money just to get you the best possible institution?

The point is, how much you need to learn depends on where you are. Have you just passed out or are you already working? What is your level of aptitude and learning capacity?

And why should you read my answers? Well, if you find more about me, you will definitely know!

Time and skills

Keep reading

Meet Again the question is quite vague and excuse me, who are you? That is the most important point that people forget when looking for work.

If knowledge of Python is such an important thing, why is the company applying for a BE / MCA degree from reputable universities?

Why do parents spend so much money just to get you the best possible institution?

The point is, how much you need to learn depends on where you are. Have you just passed out or are you already working? What is your level of aptitude and learning capacity?

And why should you read my answers? Well, if you find more about me, you will definitely know!

Time and skills required for Fresher: I have created a special section for newcomers as their problem is different and therefore the solution as well. Now this is a great myth that just knowing Python will get you a job. Absolutely not. And the second biggest lie is that Python helps you a lot in data science. Once again, a big lie. So to get a job in IT, you need to learn

  1. Web development: HTML, CSS and Angular / ReactJs. This is a must when looking for such a cool job today.
  2. API Developer: Django is a framework you can focus on if you are looking to start your career as a back-end developer.
  3. Linux / Unix / Sql - There are many support profiles where these skills will help along with knowledge of Python scripts.
  4. NodeJS: There are many entry-level jobs available in NodeJS and quite a bit less competition.
  5. ReactJs - The best front-end work available and great openings with the best packages.
  6. Angular - Still in high demand. Easier than React. React needs more advanced programming skills.
  7. CSS - This is the skill that will always be green and does not require any coding skills.
  8. SEO / Digital Marketing - This is pretty cool for those struggling with programming.
  9. Java / .NET: These are also pretty good for beginners and for the great jobs available.
  10. Wordpress / PHP - They are still on the market and will be in the future too.

But yes, I understand how much you need to learn. I will say that until then you will become an expert in any of the above. It takes 6 to 1 years on average to do so. And then you need to develop something great and useful. Basic college-level projects won't help you. That is why I have opened my own company to do the same. Ping me at 9511671017 for details.

Time and Skills Required for IT Guys: So if you're working in support or something and you still want to move on to a better profile, just read my answers below. That will help you a lot.

Rahul Akhouri's answer to How many months does it take to learn Python good enough to get a job?

What are the prerequisites to start learning machine learning?

Thank you and I am sure it will help you all and do not hesitate to talk to me!

Python is the most amazing language I have come across. I love Python and am predisposed to it.

While people were trying to be friends with Java and C ++ during college, I fell in love with this beautiful lady named Python.

She has never let me down and has been with me ever since. It was python because:

  • I managed to place on campus (I wrote 2 programs easily in Python where people in C had problems)
  • I was introduced to NLP (natural language processing) because of Python at my university, which sparked my interest in this area.
  • It could easily enter the field of machine learning, data science, as
Keep reading

Python is the most amazing language I have come across. I love Python and am predisposed to it.

While people were trying to be friends with Java and C ++ during college, I fell in love with this beautiful lady named Python.

She has never let me down and has been with me ever since. It was python because:

  • I managed to place on campus (I wrote 2 programs easily in Python where people in C had problems)
  • I was introduced to NLP (natural language processing) because of Python at my university, which sparked my interest in this area.
  • He could easily get into the field of machine learning, data science, as he was good at Python.
  • You could learn web frameworks like Flask / Django where building applications is very easy and fast.
  • Getting to know Python web frameworks easily led me to go to Hackathons, resulting in more connections and opportunities. Winning hackathons gave more weight to my resume.
  • Knowing NLP led me to easily get into chatbot creation, knowing that chatbots opened so many job offers for me.
  • Being good at Python - resulted in being invited to take Python training at the university I studied. And he also trained faculties of multiple engineering universities in Python / Django / Data Science.
  • Having a good gradual exposure of NLP / Machine Learning and Chatbots led to me being invited as a guest speaker at the Indian Institute of Science.
  • Became Python mentor on multiple online platforms as there are fewer people on Python compared to Java, C, C ++

I don't remember much, but one thing led to another and only Python provided the whole foundation from scratch until now. And I can say that without Python all this would not have been possible. Python has boosted my career 10 times.

No, learning Python alone is not enough.

You need to learn to solve problems, for which you must have a good understanding of data structure and algorithms.

After you get good at Python and solve problems using Python then you can get a trainee position at Some company, where they will ask you to get good with some framework that is being used there for development, after that you get a job real.

Note: - Maybe if you are very good at Python, I mean exceptionally good, then you can get a job in a good company through a coding competition or something like that.

Other Guides:


GET SPECIAL OFFER FROM OUR PARTNER.