I am entering my last year of my degree, but I no longer want to be a teacher. What are my options?

Updated on : December 4, 2021 by Jaylee Small



I am entering my last year of my degree, but I no longer want to be a teacher. What are my options?

May I suggest that you complete your title and credential. The student teaches! That can make you change your mind. If not, know that most jobs that require a bachelor's degree don't care what it is. They use the title to rule out those who do not have tests of punctuality, intelligence, reading ability, social skills, etc. The title means that you can dedicate four years to a job and meet all the requirements for four years. The employer is confident that if you can do that, you will be able to get on with your job, learn what the training wants to teach you, and then apply it.
If you read the professional

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May I suggest that you complete your title and credential. The student teaches! That can make you change your mind. If not, know that most jobs that require a bachelor's degree don't care what it is. They use the title to rule out those who do not have tests of punctuality, intelligence, reading ability, social skills, etc. The title means that you can dedicate four years to a job and meet all the requirements for four years. The employer is confident that if you can do that, you will be able to get on with your job, learn what the training wants to teach you, and then apply it.
If you read the professional search ads, you will see "Title Required", but rarely the type of title indicated.
If you have an internship service at your university, tell them to find you a non-teaching job. By the way, there are jobs in education that don't involve teaching: curriculum planning, financial services, procurement, etc. For these, a district would rather have someone with a degree in education so they can understand what they are doing and who they will be working with.
By the way, most interviews won't even bother to ask you what your title is. My undergraduate degree is a Bachelor of Science. It says nothing about education or any other specialty. Your title can be the same. Nobody in any interview asked about my specialty. Even the school districts didn't ask about the title. It was my credential, the state license to teach, what they wanted to see.
Look around you, talk to friends, especially those who are not going to teach, take their suggestions, and seek a professional job with your degree in hand.

A difficult one. I myself started my teacher studies in Finland, and I was almost ready with my studies there, but I had to move to Germany due to family circumstances. I thought, hey, we're in Europe, it shouldn't be difficult to finish my studies here. What a tool I was. I got study credits to some extent from my previous studies in Finland, but only about 20% of them, so I started studies here. Now 5 years later, I am almost finally ready with my studies, but due to some really stupid things in the curriculum, I didn't want to follow the life of a teacher as well. Now I have basically 4 or 5 Ba and M

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A difficult one. I myself started my teacher studies in Finland, and I was almost ready with my studies there, but I had to move to Germany due to family circumstances. I thought, hey, we're in Europe, it shouldn't be difficult to finish my studies here. What a tool I was. I got study credits to some extent from my previous studies in Finland, but only about 20% of them, so I started studies here. Now 5 years later, I am almost finally ready with my studies, but due to some really stupid things in the curriculum, I didn't want to follow the life of a teacher as well. Now I have basically 4 or 5 Ba's and Ma's, in the fields of German language, English language, sports science, pädagogig and teacher studies for ages 6-15, and a few other things, and yet, I still wonder what I should do do the following. I have studied at universities for more than 10 years, but I have not gotten the papers yet. I think I want to start my own business or start studying physics or some kind of rocket engineering, but hey, who knows, maybe I'll have a new idea tomorrow and everything will change. But I wish you the best of luck in your life and let me know if you find something interesting, maybe you can help me then :) I think I will finish my studies in Finland when I have time, but actually I am quite happy how things are going now, with or without degree . Maybe I have a new idea tomorrow and everything will change. But I wish you the best of luck in your life and let me know if you find something interesting, maybe you can help me then :) I think I will finish my studies in Finland when I have time, but actually I am quite happy how things are going now, with or without degree . Maybe I have a new idea tomorrow and everything will change. But I wish you the best of luck in your life and let me know if you find something interesting, maybe you can help me then :) I think I will finish my studies in Finland when I have time, but actually I am quite happy how things are going now, with or without degree .

This is just my experience, no doubt other opinions will vary greatly.

I did the same, it turns out not a big problem. I bet most people are with Ed. Grades don't teach. You may need to get some certificates in whatever area you intend to work in, but your specific degree isn't as important as you might think, assuming you don't intend to work in engineering or science. I went straight into the business, where I retired years later. I was able to write a speech well thanks to my training, so my first job was to write letters for electrical engineers who barely spoke. T

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This is just my experience, no doubt other opinions will vary greatly.

I did the same, it turns out not a big problem. I bet most people are with Ed. Grades don't teach. You may need to get some certificates in whatever area you intend to work in, but your specific degree isn't as important as you might think, assuming you don't intend to work in engineering or science. I went straight into the business, where I retired years later. I was able to write a speech well thanks to my training, so my first job was to write letters for electrical engineers who barely spoke. Then I went on to buy and then to bid. After a short period of time, no one cares what his degree is in (see exceptions above, law and medicine too) or where he went to school. They will only care if you can get the job done, your track record is everything. The Ed. However, the grade was helpful.

UK 08/08/21 A degree Education is a degree and once obtained it cannot be taken away. A degree in education, as in Drama you must have thought, be a considerable advantage when communication skills are required. You never know, but in later life, when you have acquired life skills, you may reconsider a teaching career. A colleague of mine in the RAF had been trained as a teacher before joining as a regular aircraft engineer for 12 years. He left the RAF as I did as a sergeant and, after a few months, applied to re-enter the teaching profession. Eventually he ended up in the rank of director and in a ministerial position.

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UK 08/08/21 A degree Education is a degree and once obtained it cannot be taken away. A degree in education, as in Drama you must have thought, be a considerable advantage when communication skills are required. You never know, but in later life, when you have acquired life skills, you may reconsider a teaching career. A colleague of mine in the RAF had been trained as a teacher before joining as a regular aircraft engineer for 12 years. He left the RAF as I did as a sergeant and, after a few months, applied to re-enter the teaching profession. He eventually ended up in the rank of principal and a ministerial position as a government educational adviser / inspector.

You should definitely research your options.

I wouldn't consider pursuing a career that doesn't interest me.

You better lose a year and head in another direction.

Why? Let's see here:

  • Teachers are now expected to be parents, babysitters, and educators rolled into one. If your kids are in trouble ... it can't possibly be your fault. They are the teachers, not doing their job!
  • Discipline in education has worn out to the point that children know that there is little we can do when they misbehave. Put them in detention? You waste 30 to 60 minutes of your time. Not funny, but not judgmental. Call your parents? Not long ago, because parents rarely believe that their child has done something wrong. Children know that teachers have little available to do about
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Why? Let's see here:

  • Teachers are now expected to be parents, babysitters, and educators rolled into one. If your kids are in trouble ... it can't possibly be your fault. They are the teachers, not doing their job!
  • Discipline in education has worn out to the point that children know that there is little we can do when they misbehave. Put them in detention? You waste 30 to 60 minutes of your time. Not funny, but not judgmental. Call your parents? Not long ago, because parents rarely believe that their child has done something wrong. Children know that teachers have little available to do about their behavior.
  • On a related note, it is now extremely difficult to expel a student. In reality, it costs the school a lot of money, so schools are forced to spend more and more time, effort, and money trying to reform students who simply don't want to participate.
  • Job performance (and often pay) is directly related to student performance on exams and meeting target grades. Although this is to be expected, it also means that the poor results fall squarely on your shoulders. Do you know that disturbing, disconnected kid who doesn't want to work? It's your fault.
  • Class size is a balloon - realistically, the ideal classroom would be around 18-20 students. That gives you a good group of kids to work with, the ability to focus more of your time on people, and means that controlling the classroom is easier. Instead ... we have as many as 30 to 35 children crammed into a classroom like sardines. It's close, it's awkward, and children can't be made to feel like we care about them as individuals when we have so many crammed into a room.
  • Your working hours are not the same as your working hours. You may be paid 30 to 35 hours a week (with 20 to 25 hours of "contact time"), but realistically, you are more likely to put 40 to 60 hours working. Lesson planning, proofreading, 'book review', assessment preparation, participation in professional development, staff meetings, parent-teacher conferences, staff detentions… You know about those great long vacations you have? You really don't understand them. A two week break at Easter is more of a long weekend. The rest of the time, you will likely spend hours updating your grade and preparing for everything that accumulates when the term resumes.
  • Oh, on that note, you don't get paid for that vacation. People believe that (curiously), but what actually happens is that your salary during the periods you work is spread out over 12 months. You are always paid at the beginning of the month, but never during those vacation periods. And by the way, it's a forced vacation. You can't choose when you get them, and you can't choose not to have them; you're out when the kids are. It does not mean that it is not working, of course, it will be. They just don't pay you for it.
  • Pressure from mid-level and top-level leaders tends to be staggeringly high. Classroom observations tend to be frequent, disruptive, and, of course, demanding. The same is true of inspections: although you accept them as part of the job, they are major sources of stress in a job that is often already very stressful.
  • Socialization. I'll be honest with you: I hadn't thought about this until I started working at a school, but I socialize more on any given day than you do in a whole week. My school has 1700 children and more than 200 employees. The classes are around 25-30 kids, and you have five of them in one day, plus the break and lunchtime chores (the staff don't have a 40-60 minute lunch break, by the way, It's about 15 minutes, if you're lucky!). Do the math on that: at a minimum, you're going to interact with 125 kids a day. More unstructured time, more colleagues, more parents. That's exhausting in ways you wouldn't believe.
  • Responsibility. Beyond your educational well-being, you are responsible for the safety and well-being of each child in your care. Anything that happens to them physically or emotionally while they are in their classroom is in their heads.
  • Wearing a mask: You must realize that the person you see teaching you is not your real teacher. That is not the same person: it is his professional face. The caring, calm, understanding and knowledgeable person, who smiles and always looks unflappable. That is what children need from us: to be the stable adult. It does not matter that you barely slept this week, you have problems in your relationships, financial problems, you are stressed and pressured by work, you have not had time to mark those papers, you have an observation tomorrow. You may have your own kids and your partner to deal with ... You can't show any of that. That puts a lot of stress on a person and it can be a struggle to deal with.
  • The curriculum and school policies used in schools are often made by people who have never worked in education before. Your Secretary of Education? A politician who went to a private school and would not set foot in a public school unless he made an "appearance", and he better believe that that will not give him a realistic view of what is really going on. This is the craziest of things.
  • Even the best effort you put into teaching will always be "working as expected."

I'll be frank: you have to be a real idiot to want to work in teaching.

I? I'm an idiot.

There are many benefits at work. You have to understand that part, but you have to be aware of the downsides. If you are a good, dedicated and committed teacher, you will enjoy a stable career that will last as long as you. If you have passion and energy, you will find that it is reflected in the children you work with, and they will respond and succeed because of your inspiration. You will meet children in their most formative years and you can help them overcome obstacles and face problems that they could struggle with without you. You will always leave a lasting impression.

Don't fool yourself into thinking it's easy and never imagine it's an 8 to 4 job. It's not really a career or a job - it's a lifetime commitment. My advice? Don't do it until you've gotten a taste of it - be an observer, volunteer, or technical assistant for a while. Then take the step. If you jump in inexperienced, you will drown.

Big question! I am a first year teacher teaching eighth grade social studies.

No, I am not a coach. Thanks for asking!

With teaching, you really have to love the age you want to teach MORE than your subject. People always ask me crazy history questions like I'm a historical scholar (I'm coming). But really, I'm in it for the students. I'm in this to teach students how to be proper citizens of the United States, how to form coherent thoughts and not just yell "That's stupid" or "You suck" and I teach why teens need to be loved by at least one person. in the world.

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Big question! I am a first year teacher teaching eighth grade social studies.

No, I am not a coach. Thanks for asking!

With teaching, you really have to love the age you want to teach MORE than your subject. People always ask me crazy history questions like I'm a historical scholar (I'm coming). But really, I'm in it for the students. I'm in this to teach students how to be proper citizens of the United States, how to form coherent thoughts and not just yell "That's stupid" or "You suck" and I teach why teens need to be loved by at least one person. in the world. If that's me then keep rockin 'out

In general, I love teaching. Even today, the day before spring break, I love it. This morning I thought, "What if I work in an office and sit in front of a computer all day?" How dreadful!

When I wake up in the morning, I am really excited. Every day is different, and it really is up to me to determine how well my day is going. My worst teaching days are usually the ones when I half-plan a lesson. My best is when I invest in a solid lesson that excites students.

However, there are some extreme negatives to the profession that you should be aware of.

1. You will not be respected enough. Always. Some of my friends and family see teaching as a glorified camp counseling position. Are you kidding me ?!

2. You will see students in the worst family conditions ever. And there is nothing you can do except treat them as equals.

3. If something makes sense, your district or state won't. For example, last year my school eliminated the English Learner program for students who cannot speak English. This year, we have several students struggling because they don't speak English. And yet my school decides to hire instructional instructors to tell teachers how to reach these students. I majored in history. I don't speak French, Arabic, Spanish, Chinese, etc.

4. The pay is not very good. I am 24 years old and earn $ 35,500 for a freshman teacher. This sounds good to me now, but I highly doubt that I will ever make more than $ 70,000.

But like I said, it's an excellent job full of funny stories, long days (if you want them to be long), and rewarding memories. Good luck! We need good teachers.

(And yes, my name is not Jack Wade. I had to change my Quora profile because my students were Googling my name and stalking my presence online)

Don't be distressed. You have so many options! First, make sure as much as you can that you no longer want to be a teacher. You don't want to make a hasty decision, regret it, and waste time and money.

I taught for 7 years and it is a great profession that I miss (therefore I am still writing about teaching on Quora), but I have absolutely no regrets about my decision to switch careers to a completely different field - web development!

You can always go back to teaching if you want to; teachers are often in high demand. So what I did when I decided for sure to quit teaching was make a list of hobbies and

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Don't be distressed. You have so many options! First, make sure as much as you can that you no longer want to be a teacher. You don't want to make a hasty decision, regret it, and waste time and money.

I taught for 7 years and it is a great profession that I miss (therefore I am still writing about teaching on Quora), but I have absolutely no regrets about my decision to switch careers to a completely different field - web development!

You can always go back to teaching if you want to; teachers are often in high demand. So what I did when I decided to quit teaching was make a list of hobbies and jobs that I enjoyed or think I might enjoy. I started taking courses in these areas to see what I would like to continue with.

As a teacher, you have a lot of translatable skills. I constantly hear from potential employers how they love the teaching experience. You are patient, kind, cooperative, a team player, capable of multitasking, a good learner and communicator, well organized, detail oriented, and excellent at problem solving, especially on the spot - you know, improvising! Ha ha, of course I know he never "liked" him as a teacher.

I believe in making your destiny. Don't settle if you don't want to.

Here are some resources on other related careers you can slide into:

  • Five alternative careers for teachers
  • http://www.reallygoodstuff.com/community/20-job-ideas-for-teachers/
  • Alternatives to teaching: 20 companies that hire teachers

Or, skip the career-related resources and decide for yourself what you'd like to do. There is a saying: do a job that you enjoy and you would not work a day in your life. Well that's not really realistic because a job is a job. But still, find something close to that.

However, be smart! Save money and make sure you're covered before exploring and finding yourself. Good luck!

Ok, I'll be honest.

You really need to think about what you want to do and whether or not your plans are feasible.

First, you don't want to teach in your home country. There is nothing wrong with wanting to teach abroad, but you are seriously considering dropping out of your program because you don't want to teach in your country at all. Why not? You say you "hate it". Don't be offended, but without knowing the reasons behind your hatred, it is hard for me to believe that you will be happy teaching anywhere.

Second, this is a comment you added in response:

I have to finish 2 months of internship, however

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Ok, I'll be honest.

You really need to think about what you want to do and whether or not your plans are feasible.

First, you don't want to teach in your home country. There is nothing wrong with wanting to teach abroad, but you are seriously considering dropping out of your program because you don't want to teach in your country at all. Why not? You say you "hate it". Don't be offended, but without knowing the reasons behind your hatred, it is hard for me to believe that you will be happy teaching anywhere.

Second, this is a comment you added in response:

I have to finish 2 months of placement, however if I retire now I will receive a 4 year dual degree in education / arts. This title does not qualify me to teach here, however I plan to move abroad and teach English ... eventually I would like to open my own language school (s) and do self teaching online + sell resources online.

Going to school here makes me miserable hahaha I could bear it and spend 2 months doing something I hate, however I have no intention of teaching here after my last placements.

As an English teacher, I am concerned about your grammar and your style. I know I know I'm being a pedant. I usually don't comment on people's grammar because I'm not perfect either, but if you're going to teach English, especially abroad, you need at least a passing understanding of the fundamentals of grammar (e.g., Write with capitalize the personal pronoun 'I' and avoid comma junctions).

You do not have enough command of the language to write it correctly. What makes you think you will be able to teach it effectively, let alone start your own "language school (s)"? This is especially true if you are considering abandoning a program that can potentially teach you the skills necessary to achieve those goals.

Look, I probably sound like an idiot, and I'm sure I'll hear it in the comments, but your question, whether intentional or not, makes fun of my profession. You make it seem like teaching, freelancing, selling your resources online, and starting your own school is easy. The time, dedication, personal sacrifice, and effort that I (and most teachers) have put into the craft have developed over the years, and I am still a newbie.

Your goals are noble and I sincerely wish you the best if that is what you really want to do. If you want to teach, teach. You can learn grammar and style and pedagogy. If you don't like the way your school is raising you, you can do it yourself. But it seems that the effort required for success is taking a back seat to an idealized vision of your future success that you have declared to be a certainty.

If you are so frivolous about your current situation, you will not be successful in the future.

I think you need to do a real soul-searching.

I went through this when I was a student teacher, and it seems to be a relatively common thing to do. About halfway through, when I was exhausted every day after school, and even on the weekends, I wondered if this was the right thing to do or not. I would fall asleep at my desk at school, go home, fall asleep for hours, have dinner, and then go to bed. To this day, I have never been more exhausted than when I was a teaching student, and that made me miserable. My collaborating teacher and other teachers in my department noticed that it was getting difficult and offered me some words to

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I went through this when I was a student teacher, and it seems to be a relatively common thing to do. About halfway through, when I was exhausted every day after school, and even on the weekends, I wondered if this was the right thing to do or not. I would fall asleep at my desk at school, go home, fall asleep for hours, have dinner, and then go to bed. To this day, I have never been more exhausted than when I was a teaching student, and that made me miserable. My collaborating teacher and other teachers in my department realized that it was getting difficult and offered me some words of encouragement. My advice, as someone who went through exactly what you have described and is currently teaching, is to get over it.

Finish your career. You literally have nothing to gain by quitting teaching students. You've already paid for it (and you probably won't get a refund) and you will have to start your degree from your general academic requirements. You might as well finish it, get your bachelor's degree, and then give it a try. You can do what I did and work a semester as an assistant (I did it out of necessity, since I graduated in December, but it's a good way to start anyway). This gives you a look at the classroom from a non-teaching perspective, but it also gives you some controlled interactions with students. For me, this pushed me to do Special Education instead of Gen-ed, but it also reaffirmed that this is what I wanted to do.

As others have mentioned here, it is a very different experience than having your own class. When a student teaches, everything is very controlled, very structured and does not necessarily have their own teaching style (they may not have developed it yet). Try to do the best you can. Do the best job you can and ask questions. Your collaborating teacher wants this to be a good experience for you, so if something strange happens, they will most likely try to fix it.

Just try to avoid dropping out. You have put in 3-4 years of hard work to get to where you are now. One more semester won't hurt, especially when the other option starts from where it was two years ago. Finish it, graduate with a teaching degree, and try to find a job. If you work in schools for a year and you don't like it, then don't teach. There are many other things you can do with that degree (mainly because it provides a very broad and strong academic and skills foundation).

You have more control over what you are doing when you teach in your own room. You don't have to take a job teaching a certain grade level or subject, if you don't want to.

Hold on, you're almost there :)

To be honest, I haven't decided yet that I don't want to be a teacher anymore. The distinction is that you may have to choose to stop being a teacher, but it's not because you don't want to be.

In other answers, I described the fact that I recently became a father. That little girl will be 4 in a week. With the way things are going, I may not be able to provide you with the opportunities that I would like. To be clear, I am not saying that my problem with education is in my inability to provide you with a Ford Mustang when you turn 16. I am trying to say that for a person who b

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To be honest, I haven't decided yet that I don't want to be a teacher anymore. The distinction is that you may have to choose to stop being a teacher, but it's not because you don't want to be.

In other answers, I described the fact that I recently became a father. That little girl will be 4 in a week. With the way things are going, I may not be able to provide you with the opportunities that I would like. To be clear, I am not saying that my problem with education is my inability to provide you with a Ford Mustang when you turn 16. I'm trying to say that for a person who believes in the value of education, I won 'Not being able to send her to Washington DC to see the Smithsonian museums. I can't send her backpacking around the world to discover herself and experience other cultures. If she wants a special opportunity to do a summer internship like the Emperor Scence award, I don't think I can afford gas or temporary housing instead of gas for her to fulfill this opportunity.

But here's the real catch: Since I'm a person who believes in education and I'm employed in education, consider that I may not be able to afford you an education. The way the cost of going to college has increased in the past already makes us a huge struggle for many teacher families. Predict what this cost will be like in the future if inflation related to higher education continues.

Before going to the comment section, please note that I know that University is not the answer to everything. Yes, I know there are many majors that do not require a college degree. Yes, I even know that when my daughter comes of age, she may choose not to go to college. That is not the point here. Please note that here I am working to make sure your child has the opportunity to do whatever they want when they finish high school. (Again, please do not argue with me about semantics. I am working to give this opportunity to any child in society with whom I interact. Just because I am not your child does not mean I am not representing your child). There is a certain kind of dark injustice in the sense that my son would not have the same opportunity.

Oh, I have taken steps to invest and try to prevent this from happening. It certainly means a lot more scraping and dispensing with what other 12-year-olds and specialty folks with advanced degrees seem to face.

Growing up, we laughed at the irony that the electricity doesn't work in the electrician's house and the plumbing doesn't work in the plumber's house (my family consists of many electricians). It seems a bit asymmetrical that an educator cannot afford education. The premise of the above statement is that when the electrician or plumber comes home they are too tired to worry about their own petty electrical or plumbing problems. The salary limitations that come with working in education are not the choice of the teacher, and a teacher decides to fix it on their own. Instead, they spend their precious little time getting involved in the community to raise awareness (or specifically fundraise ...).

TL; DR: As for me and most of the teachers I know, we more often leave the field when wages and salaries become unsustainable rather than because we “want” to.

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