I am an international student who cannot find a job in Australia. I study Software Engineering a lot, with good results. What am I doing wrong?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Jocelyn Fry



I am an international student who cannot find a job in Australia. I study Software Engineering a lot, with good results. What am I doing wrong?

First, treat your job search as a software problem to be solved. There is a solution, you need to build it. It involves researching, thinking and doing.

Second, well, "incomplete requirements." What city are you in? Sydney is different from Canberra is different from Melbourne. What areas of Software Engineering do you study? What can you do? How good are your results?

Third, the type of work you can do as an intern, and the type of work you get paid for while studying, are not the same. As an intern, you are there to learn your trade and the organization. As a paid resource, you are there to deliver the merchandise. Usually that means not doing what you want to do upon graduation, but much simpler. Let's say you're a programmer for a group of web designers doing projects under a million.

That being said, if you are an expert on the Hadoop ecosystem in Sydney or Canberra, send me a message.

I will give you some options that have been tried and tested.

  1. Learn to lie on the resume. Yes lie! If you have no experience in the Australian market, you are from a non-white, non-Anglo country, where English is not your primary language or title; Your chances are automatically reduced by outperforming Australian recruiters by 50%. If you know you have the skills, make up a job with some local references and do an amazing interview by beating the doorman, that is, the recruiter.
  2. I have 7 years of working experience with recruiters from UK, US, Europe and now Australia. Some of the dimmer wi
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I will give you some options that have been tried and tested.

  1. Learn to lie on the resume. Yes lie! If you have no experience in the Australian market, you are from a non-white, non-Anglo country, where English is not your primary language or title; Your chances are automatically reduced by outperforming Australian recruiters by 50%. If you know you have the skills, make up a job with some local references and do an amazing interview by beating the doorman, that is, the recruiter.
  2. I have 7 years of working experience with recruiters from UK, US, Europe and now Australia. Some of the dumbest recruiters who are programmed to think that everything Australian should take precedence, regardless of matchmaking experience, are Australian recruiters. There is no need to be nice to them or spend time falling in love with them. Play hard. Recruiters are known as 'body shoppers' in our consultant parlance and they are only there to get your pound of meat out of your pay and can get rid of you in an instant. They are not your friends. Most also know nothing about their technical mastery. So don't try to please them with your experience. If you want,
  3. Network with insiders. Most of the jobs are already filled before coming to SEEK or any other job board. That is the other trap here. Nepotism. Yes, believe it or not, but in Australia due to a very small market and a high degree of competition, most managers are hiring their loved and close ones, but are simply publishing it officially to escape legal criticism from HR Candidates line up beforehand, unless there is a very specific demand that needs to be met. (For example, larger deployments with high manpower requirements or specialized roles.) What often happens in larger organizations is that managers or their HR They send these jobs to internal employees for recommendation to any of their friends (for which they get a referral bonus), and after this they post them on external domains. Therefore, your chances of meeting R1's deadlines are greater than R2's! ...
  4. In Australia there is an isolated misperception that the way things are done here is done nowhere else in the world. Not even in the UK, but maybe in the US. If you have experience in America, only they will bow down to you in submission and admiration. Otherwise, they are likely to have a two-year Australian experience during their 14+ years of experience. So do a little research on what tools etc are here and write them down on your resume. And then study about them. These tools are usually not a big deal. Mainly one two days of study maximum. Rest, you can fix once you enter.
  5. Always, always get an Australian driver's license as the first thing you do after landing! Most jobs require a bit of travel and you don't want to lose any jobs because you don't have a driver's license. Nobody told me this and I had suffered because of it, but I let you here know to do it as P0.

In the end, be willing to do some odd jobs because you are likely to burn out if you come with your family to bigger and more expensive cities like Sydney. Odd jobs are not looked down upon and the rates of a labor worker can sometimes equal those of an office worker. Those are the weird things you'll find here about doctors driving taxis and other things.

Lastly, don't compare the Australian job market with the American one. In America they have the preference given to the underdog with the benefit of the doubt. In Australia, the market is strong only in 3-4 states and there are more doubts than associated benefits.

The answer is definitely "yes", and it is getting better every year. However, there are a few things to keep in mind.

You must distinguish between "software engineer" and "analyst-programmer". The first covers some areas of IT, the other covers business and one of the "dominant stacks." One's challenge is to make something happen that hasn't been done before. The other's challenges are complex and not necessarily logical products, and they fill the gap in often ineffective business analysis.

There are several software houses in Australia, Atlassian says, and some of the major companies have

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The answer is definitely "yes", and it is getting better every year. However, there are a few things to keep in mind.

You must distinguish between "software engineer" and "analyst-programmer". The first covers some areas of IT, the other covers business and one of the "dominant stacks." One's challenge is to make something happen that hasn't been done before. The other's challenges are complex and not necessarily logical products, and they fill the gap in often ineffective business analysis.

There are several software houses in Australia, Atlassian says, and some of the major companies have development teams in Australia. I also know some really exceptional software engineers who work for American companies while living in Australia.

Also, there are several sites that have an IT culture similar to software engineering, that believe in writing their own software, and keep abreast of recent developments. Sites like that can offer more money with less stress to a competent engineer. There are several service providers serving clients like this, which have even more of a software engineering type culture.

And of course, while we don't have anywhere near the startup culture of the US or Israel, it can't be helped that people dream, so interesting organizations come up from time to time.

All of the above presupposes that the use of the words "software engineer" is not accidental; Miguel Paraz's A2Aed makes you suggest that. However, if by "software engineer" you mean "Java / C # Developer", then the jobs are plentiful, especially if you have some exposure to the Microsoft / Oracle / IBM / SAP stack. and they pay more than anywhere else outside the Persian Gulf.

If you are an excellent software engineer, you can probably get a job in Timbuktu, sitting from home.

But for Australia, the recession is FAST approaching. Plus, with the 10 billion lost in the wildfires, the economy is really reeling now with the corona virus. Recruitment companies just don't have enough jobs to fill and most are basically empty duplicate posts. Most recruiters are high school pass agents who don't give a shit whether they hire you or not (one was chewing on an apple while talking to me on the phone for the first time!). I guess they ain't grilled for bonuses or the number

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If you are an excellent software engineer, you can probably get a job in Timbuktu, sitting from home.

But for Australia, the recession is FAST approaching. Plus, with the 10 billion lost in the wildfires, the economy is really reeling now with the corona virus. Recruitment companies just don't have enough jobs to fill and most are basically empty duplicate posts. Most recruiters are high school pass agents who don't give a shit whether they hire you or not (one was chewing on an apple while talking to me on the phone for the first time!). I guess they aren't on the grill because of the bonuses or the numbers they've gotten in sales. It's all based on who knows who, as if you were living in a small village community. So if you come from outside,

On the other hand, due to the increasing number of immigrants coming, hiring and firing has become the new norm compared to about 3 years ago. I still remember a bartender from Poland, who cried and cursed in Polish next to me because I missed a lap on his street (it didn't appear on the map) and said that 'his manager will fire him from his job and why was this happening to him? this! '. I had to park my car in the parking lot and go to his manager to talk about things ... because he was only 30 minutes late! THIS is the actual situation for labor workers in Australia. Underpaid and threatened. The US market is much larger than Australia / UK and most of the manufacturing is done there.

Another factor is the difference in the psyche of Americans versus Australians / British. American culture primarily supports the homeless. The American media and literature are full of help or support to the oppressed or to the newcomer and gain strength. These are the pillars of how American society is where it is now. On the other hand, Australian culture is very aggressive. They will be ready to jump on any minor discomfort caused by someone, regardless of whether it is new or not. People tend to live in relatively small circles of their own ilk. The way they play sports is also indicative of the same behavior. It is known that most Australian athletes not only win,

I can see a slow brain drain from Australia in the near future. Also, remember that apart from discrimination, companies will try to filter your CV down to 0.001% that your CV does not match the SOW. Therefore, you must be ACCURATE with the requirements even for an initial interview consideration. And all you get after a 2 hour grill interview is a 6-12 month initial contract offer. The permanent space will depend on how much you work in the workplace or if there was any place for it. If you are in IT, I will suggest that you apply for network or data analyst jobs, rather than simple software engineers.

UTS - without a doubt ...

reasons: -

Well connected with the international community (others are too, but has an advantage over others)

Located in Sydney and has a more technology focused curriculum. It is also like a fast paced environment, so you are sure to be among the best minds (students, colleagues, faculties, etc.) and you are always using the newest tools and technologies.

Also, as for work, it is quite safe. The main software companies are located in Sydney (google, MSFT etc to name a few, also AUS package leader - Atlassian)

Also, it's not as easy to get into UTS as it sounds, as most people (better minds) who are pl

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UTS - without a doubt ...

reasons: -

Well connected with the international community (others are too, but has an advantage over others)

Located in Sydney and has a more technology focused curriculum. It is also like a fast paced environment, so you are sure to be among the best minds (students, colleagues, faculties, etc.) and you are always using the newest tools and technologies.

Also, as for work, it is quite safe. The main software companies are located in Sydney (google, MSFT etc to name a few, also AUS package leader - Atlassian)

Also, it's not as easy to get into UTS as it sounds as most people (better minds) planning to go to AUS or already in AUS have UTS as their first preference.

Internships are a bomb too (all major tech companies Google, MSFT, banks like NAB, CBA, telcos like Telstra, etc. frequently hire interns from here)

NOTE - These are my views and not to demean any other institution. There are other great institutions in OZ like MONASH, but I prefer UTS over others for software related programs (AI, multimedia and other more hands-on courses with focus on jobs after program completion)

Permanent residency is the best way for a software engineer to settle in Australia. Permanent residency is a points-based system where you must earn 60 points based on age, qualification, work experience, and English language ability (IELTS). Verify that you are on the SOL list or CSOL list by checking your work and duties under a certain ANZSCO code. The complete procedure is on the government portals. You can calculate your points yourself. To my knowledge, the software engineer must be included in the SOL list, which means that the subclass 189 visa will be for you. Make your points, put your file by skill

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Permanent residency is the best way for a software engineer to settle in Australia. Permanent residency is a points-based system where you must earn 60 points based on age, qualification, work experience, and English language ability (IELTS). Verify that you are on the SOL list or CSOL list by checking your work and duties under a certain ANZSCO code. The complete procedure is on the government portals. You can calculate your points yourself. To my knowledge, the software engineer must be included in the SOL list, which means that the subclass 189 visa will be for you. Make your points, post your file for the skills assessment, then Express Your Interest and then for the PR presentation. If you can do it on your own, fine, otherwise, take the help of any local consultant and go for it. Before taking the help of any consultant,

http://www.goforvisa.com/

International students can work part-time, although they can never exceed forty hours per fortnight. However, chances are that if you are already studying in Australia you are also employed and your current job is not related to your studies.

To change this situation, the first step is to look for jobs (including internships) that are related to your studies, because experience in the Australian market is the key to maximizing your possibilities for the future.

Entry-level positions are a great way to start your search. You may need to have some prior experience; however, in these types

Keep reading

International students can work part-time, although they can never exceed forty hours per fortnight. However, chances are that if you are already studying in Australia you are also employed and your current job is not related to your studies.

To change this situation, the first step is to look for jobs (including internships) that are related to your studies, because experience in the Australian market is the key to maximizing your possibilities for the future.

Entry-level positions are a great way to start your search. You may need to have some prior experience; However, in these types of jobs, you can also show your skills by highlighting your previous academic projects and achievements. Also, in some cases, you can make a link between your current experience and the job on offer. Take a look at some examples below.

  • Using your current experience as a workforce to become a junior estimator.

The construction industry is looking for junior estimators, among many other positions. Let's say you are working in the construction industry as a laborer. You could use your construction site experience to become a junior estimator. Your job would be to support the production estimator while training on how to produce accurate estimates, as well as review and analyze them. In this case, you can demonstrate the skills, knowledge and experience you acquired working on the construction site, your involvement with projects, communication with other construction professionals, etc.

  • Use your experience as an engineer abroad to become a junior structure writer.

Another example comes from the engineering field, who might be looking for junior structural draftsmen. You may have studied engineering in your home country before deciding to move to Australia. It would be helpful if you could work part time as a junior structure writer. You would need experience writing AutoCAD and your duties would include writing documentation, job planning, and site visits.

Major industries (such as technology, finance, education, tourism, and manufacturing) also have great opportunities. It does not matter if you are enrolled in a Certificate IV, Diploma, or Advanced Diploma program. You can always find an entry level position in your field.

  • Use your marketing course to find a marketing assistant position.

For example, if you are studying for a Diploma in Marketing, you can find an entry-level position as a junior marketing assistant at a marketing agency.

The same thinking can be applied to students enrolled in a Design Diploma. They can apply for a junior designer position or they can apply for receptionist jobs at a design agency to start gaining experience on how an agency works.

The possibilities are limitless.

You need to expand your mind and your thinking to defy the odds, which will lead you to find new solutions. I'm not saying it's easy, really far from it; however, it will be possible if you are willing to try.

A few more articles to help you:

  1. Your situation in Australia and how you can win.
  2. Who do you want to be?

I wish you the best,

Vanessa Sebben | Managing Director of VS Strategy


VS Strategy is committed to helping international students and trained professionals develop strategies to advance their careers in Australia and ultimately find their dream job. Learn more about us: VS Strategy.

On a scale of difficulty level from 1 to 10, being a very easy one, it should be 6 :)

Sponsors: You
will have to find a sponsor, which is a company that will offer you a job offer. Either the sponsor can initiate the visa at your cost in won (this case is unlikely in most cases when you are the applicant) or you can contact a consultant who will initiate your visa and recommend some sponsors, it could cost you around 40K + 1.75L. Be careful when choosing your consultancy.

Relevant work experience -
Australian visa is basically point based, as far as I know (check this out). From Cisco and Oracle experi

Keep reading

On a scale of difficulty level from 1 to 10, being a very easy one, it should be 6 :)

Sponsors: You
will have to find a sponsor, which is a company that will offer you a job offer. Either the sponsor can initiate the visa at your cost in won (this case is unlikely in most cases when you are the applicant) or you can contact a consultant who will initiate your visa and recommend some sponsors, it could cost you around 40K + 1.75L. Be careful when choosing your consultancy.

Relevant work experience -
Australian visa is basically point based, as far as I know (check this out). From Cisco and Oracle experience, it should be from IT and it will be much better if your Bachelor's or Master's degree is in IT / Software / Computer Science.

IELTS is required, I think.

I am also a PR visa holder and have not yet moved to Australia. I will tell you that it will be quite difficult to find a job unless you move to the country and look for a job there.

If you are a foreigner and do not have any work experience in Australia, you are already at a disadvantage. If you want to have a chance, you must be in the country so that you can easily attend interviews and start work on short notice if you are hired.

It is also important to research the local "job search culture" such as what is the typical structure and content they expect from your CV,

Keep reading

I am also a PR visa holder and have not yet moved to Australia. I will tell you that it will be quite difficult to find a job unless you move to the country and look for a job there.

If you are a foreigner and do not have any work experience in Australia, you are already at a disadvantage. If you want to have a chance, you must be in the country so that you can easily attend interviews and start work on short notice if you are hired.

It is also important to research the local "job search culture" such as what is the typical structure and content they expect from your CV, what should be included in a cover letter, and so on.

These kinds of things can vary greatly from country to country. I also heard that for some jobs it is required to write a statement that addresses all the selection criteria requested by the employer, but this may only be for jobs in the public sector, I'm not sure.

Anyway ... I think, as I said, that the most important thing is to be in the country

It really depends on the type of job you are looking for.

I know someone personally who has a dependent visa (their partner has a student visa) and has a job as a commercial cleaner. You do not have the same visa conditions as your partner (Maximum 20 hours of work per week).

But if you are looking for a "white collar" job, I'm not quite sure what the possibilities are. Because from the employer's point of view, they have to consider many factors, such as your work experience in Australia. Some employers prefer to have someone who has a permanent resident or citizen visa.

Absolutely not. Especially if you meet any of these criteria

  • Over 40
  • Woman
  • Disabled
  • LGBT +
  • They are unconventional in some way (like a tattoo, unnatural hair color, piercings)
  • Have a religion that is not Christian, Catholic ...
  • They are indigenous

Keep in mind that most of these reasons for not getting hired are illegal! There are laws to protect against discrimination.

They still will. Make up whatever excuse they can to reject you.

I mean, this is if you even get a response to your resume. I delivered over 200 copies of mine a week, both by hand and by email, and only got 5 responses. Only two were for any type or

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Absolutely not. Especially if you meet any of these criteria

  • Over 40
  • Woman
  • Disabled
  • LGBT +
  • They are unconventional in some way (like a tattoo, unnatural hair color, piercings)
  • Have a religion that is not Christian, Catholic ...
  • They are indigenous

Keep in mind that most of these reasons for not getting hired are illegal! There are laws to protect against discrimination.

They still will. Make up whatever excuse they can to reject you.

I mean, this is if you even get a response to your resume. I delivered over 200 copies of mine a week, both by hand and by email, and only got 5 responses. Only two were for some kind of follow-up.

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