I am a teenager and I want to do a lot of jobs. What should I do?

Updated on : December 8, 2021 by Brooke Wells



I am a teenager and I want to do a lot of jobs. What should I do?

I totally agree with Kieran Davis: fast food.

I worked at the BK Lounge (aka Burger King) in the past, and let me tell you, it was life changing for me.

I grew up in a sheltered, middle-class suburban neighborhood. I was never hungry as a child. He didn't have a good car, but he did have a car: a legacy 1986 silver Dodge Omni:

And no, that's not me ... nor my collie ...

But to say that he knew anything about the world would have been a huge exaggeration. It was as green as you can imagine.

That is, until I started selling hamburgers for money.

I was 16 years old and it was the middle of June. It was 90 degrees o

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I totally agree with Kieran Davis: fast food.

I worked at the BK Lounge (aka Burger King) in the past, and let me tell you, it was life changing for me.

I grew up in a sheltered, middle-class suburban neighborhood. I was never hungry as a child. He didn't have a good car, but he did have a car: a legacy 1986 silver Dodge Omni:

And no, that's not me ... nor my collie ...

But to say that he knew anything about the world would have been a huge exaggeration. It was as green as you can imagine.

That is, until I started selling hamburgers for money.

I was 16 years old and it was the middle of June. It was 90 degrees outside, and at least 100 in front of the flame grill. For hours, I'd feed frozen Grade A beef patties into one end of the machine and then watch them fall through the other side fully cooked. I put them into buns and handed them out to better-trained employees whose job it was to slather them with the green white red green white red of Whopper fame (Mayo Lettuce Tomato on the top bun, Pickled Onion Ketchup on the meat ).

Every now and then the little freezer adjacent to the flame broiler was empty of meat, and I had to go to the freezer to get another box (we had dozens), open it, and empty it into the smaller one. freezer.

When the restaurant was slow, there was always something to clean. Usually he got floors, parking lots, and restrooms since he was close to the totem pole.

I worked 40 hours a minute that first week, and then I worked 18 consecutive 8-hour shifts without a day off after that.

At the end of that stretch (it was now July 4 and I finally had a day off) I took stock of my situation. This is what I had learned:

  1. School is not difficult. I thought school was tough.
  2. Standing in an oven while hot grease splatters on your face and occasionally going out to clean dirty toilets is difficult.
  3. My first paycheck was for $ 63. Subsequent checks would cost $ 100, but even then this was a negligible sum of money.
  4. I was able to make a lot more money than I thought, just by being creative. Here are some ways I made some extra money:
    1. Free Food - Any food that was ordered but not picked up (which happened a bit when people changed their minds or food was improperly prepared) was fair game. I never paid for a meal for 2 years just for making mistakes.
    2. Free money - People were dropping money in the parking lot all the time, so I constantly volunteered to sweep the parking lot. I made between $ 5 and $ 10 a day in lost change.
    3. Free Rare Coins - After a while at work, I was "promoted" to checkout. I noticed that a lot of rare coins passed through the box, so I got used to carrying change to work. If I saw an old coin, I would exchange it for an ordinary one from my pocket. I left work almost every day with old pennies, nickels, $ 2 bills… all kinds of fun things. It never amounted to much value, but I did find a nickel worth maybe $ 10: 1934 Nickel Value | Discover Your Buffalo Nickel Value
    4. Free education: I learned a lot from the manager. I learned how hiring and firing worked, how payroll was done, restaurant expenses and profits, how franchises work, etc. I was even able to watch the kitchen and electronics equipment being repaired and installed. It's amazing what you can learn if you ask "Hey, can I watch?" I even learned how to maintain a carburetor - the Omni had a bad one, and I repeatedly had to fix it.
    5. Free education, part 2: I found out what my boss was making. I was horrified. I thought I would win a lot. She does not.
    6. College "free": 2 years of Burger King, wisely kept, paid for over a year of college education. During all my time at Burger King, I spent almost nothing that I did. I had to fill up the gas tank on that sexy, sexy Omni up there, but with work only 1 mile from home, I could go several weeks on a tank of gas.
  5. "Show up and shut up" is a good mantra for many jobs. Many employees were fired for not doing one or the other of these things (or both). I was never fired, although I was not always a great employee, because I learned this rule.

But more important than all of this, Burger King taught me how difficult life can be without an education. I saw people, employees and customers alike, walk through the door with their lives in shambles. In many cases, those ruins were the direct result of earning very little money to support a life. And in most of those cases, the lack of income stemmed from a lack of education or a lack of ability to "show up and shut up."

So when college was hard, when studying was exhausting, when classes were boring, I would think back to the day I cleaned the vomited Whopper out of a sink, or the day I had to pick up a dead raccoon from the parking lot. , or the days when I had to throw myself away in the garbage container to close the lid, or the days after the days when I got burned from the splatters of grease.

College is not difficult. Poverty is tough. I learned that at Burger King. Thank you, hamburger king. Thank you Joy, my manager. Thanks Annie and Jane and the rest of the BK Tenders Crew ... you know who you are.

If you are old enough, go to work at a fast food place. You will thank me later.

I started caddy work at Olympia Fields Country Club at thirteen. Back then I was a 95 pound bag of bones, but I was a quick learner and had a good attitude to work every day.

I actually did a caddy a few weeks ago just for fun ... I saw some old friends and made some new friends while I was back in Chicago for a visit (that's me on the right).

When I was 13, I was making $ 10 a week doing my chores in the past. Air Jordans were $ 125 a pair back then. Three months of housework for a pair of shoes was unacceptable to me, so my parents suggested that I look for another job to supplement my "income.

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I started caddy work at Olympia Fields Country Club at thirteen. Back then I was a 95 pound bag of bones, but I was a quick learner and had a good attitude to work every day.

I actually did a caddy a few weeks ago just for fun ... I saw some old friends and made some new friends while I was back in Chicago for a visit (that's me on the right).

When I was 13, I was making $ 10 a week doing my chores in the past. Air Jordans were $ 125 a pair back then. Three months of housework for a pair of shoes was unacceptable to me, so my parents suggested that I look for another job to supplement my "income" (if you can call it that). They thought I would mow the lawn or tutor my classmates in math and science, but I had heard that the caddy was far superior to these options from a financial perspective. Some kids in my neighborhood had done it, so I applied and got a chance to work.

The first day I worked as a caddy, I made $ 22 for 5 hours of work. It was exhausting and I came home sweaty and reeking of the woods and streams of Chicago's southern suburbs, but I was happy. By the end of my first week I had earned enough to buy a pair of Air Jordans. I was winning.

Besides great exercise and being outdoors, being a caddy teaches you many meaningful skills at a very young age. These things include:

  • Courtesy, hospitality and respect (for club members and for your guests who they bring to golf) ... making sure your clients had a great experience with you was paramount and a lot of what went into that was common sense basic (which some 13 year old caddies did not have at the time)
  • How to establish a good relationship with all kinds of people. I worked as a caddy for young and old, locals and outsiders, men and women, boys and girls ... the conversations with each group for 5 hours straight was something I developed over the years.
  • Have a plan and a story to go with it for your future… a lot of people I caddied for wanted to know what I wanted to be when I grew up. Rehearsing my story about graduating in the top 10 of my high school class and then going to college to study engineering was all formulated and practiced during my rounds of golf with them. I suspect a lot of these folks gave me more important advice to say "good luck on your college trip Brandon ... don't spend all of this on Air Jordans."
  • Hustle and strong work ethic ... He had to get to the caddy shack before the sun came up most of the time and sometimes he wouldn't leave the field until it was about to set. Getting up early, working a tiring day, and then doing it all over again the next day was great preparation for college and the jobs I've had in my career.

I could go on and on about the lessons learned, but I'll summarize it here ... my vote for the best teen job is obviously caddying at your local country club if they have a caddy program. It's a great way to meet interesting people, learn to play golf, and build a network that can help you in your future endeavors as an adult.

I was able to pay for much of my college with this job, buy my first used car, and lastly (you guessed it) a few pairs of Air Jordans along the way. I'm still nostalgic to this day and I felt totally satisfied during that time in my life. All the best for you on your trip !!!

HTH

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