I am 25 years old, the longest job I stayed on is 1 year. I have changed 4 jobs since 2013. Should I change my current job if I am not learning anything?

Updated on : December 7, 2021 by Jake Lawrence



I am 25 years old, the longest job I stayed on is 1 year. I have changed 4 jobs since 2013. Should I change my current job if I am not learning anything?

Well boy ... that's difficult ... can you tell us what you do?

You know that this learning is relative to generations. Millenials and GenZ demand learning. They want to develop their skills. What happened to work for work?

Few things are happening here ...

I am 25 years old, the longest job I stayed on is 1 year.

From the employer's perspective ... You were trained at the cost of an expense, you endured the blow of a newcomer who may not be productive during a learning curve, and then once the productive moment arrived ... you rescued yourself. I don't know what kind of jobs you are doing ... but if you are working in a disruptive industry.

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Well boy ... that's difficult ... can you tell us what you do?

You know that this learning is relative to generations. Millenials and GenZ demand learning. They want to develop their skills. What happened to work for work?

Few things are happening here ...

I am 25 years old, the longest job I stayed on is 1 year.

From the employer's perspective ... You were trained at the cost of an expense, you endured the blow of a newcomer who may not be productive during a learning curve, and then once the productive moment arrived ... you rescued yourself. I don't know what kind of jobs you're doing ... but if you're working in a disruptive industry ... well then that's fine.

Otherwise, if you are being trained and you are "that guy" who is always looking for greener pastures ... then there is a problem.

I have changed 4 jobs since 2013.

Friend ... WHO? Who do I ask you are you working for? Are you working for this guy or what? I don't think you have a work problem, you have a boss problem. I have said it several times in my posts. Choose your boss as you choose your spouse. Pick someone with high self esteem who wants to grow your position. For more on those boss thoughts ... read this other post ...

Amber Gribbins answer to Basically, I wasted 10 years of my life after a top MBA going back and forth between mediocre consulting, finance, and IT jobs. How should I rebuild my career?

Should I change my current job or am I not learning anything?

Kiddo ... I can hear it in your voice in this post that you are screaming to be a mentor. The problem is ... you don't have anyone. Remember, you can be guided yourself. You can study, you can join professional associations, you can continue your education. Never trust a job to do what you can do for yourself. Also, you have to do "hard work" when you are starting out and receive the valuable learning, this is how the world works ... crawl before you can walk, pay your debts.

However, with that said ... life is VERY SHORT.

So final answer:

Talk to your boss and ask to learn! If your boss is a manager (not a leader) or has low self-esteem ... go ahead and find the right professional association!

It all depends on what your career is and what your long-term goals are. Furthermore, it is common for younger workers (under 25 years of age) to be given less responsibility, because they then need to acclimate to the work environment. Once you've been in a job for a year, or when you have a performance review, talk to your boss about career growth.

Absolutely not. You must stay with a company for at least a year or more. After a year you will learn SOMETHING. When you create your resume, write anything that is less than a year old. Instead, say that you were forming in that particular vocation. This way a future employer will see your resume, it will appear that you sacrificed your time to train for a career and when you have a year of employment under your belt THEN you can list it and they will see that you don't. jump from job to job. That you can stay in a job for more than a short period of time.

There are no easy answers, because it is a very personal decision and I may lack context. Change is not bad, but giving up too soon can be a wasted opportunity. Try to find a mentor who knows you very well to talk about it.

Until then, maybe you can use some questions to think about:

  • How do you know that you are not learning?
  • How do you decide when you have learned everything you have to know where you are?
  • What do you really want to learn?
  • Where do you want to go?
  • How will you know when you got there?

Obviously, a career should be a balance between learning and, well, working ...

There will always be parts of your work routine that you perceive as "routine" and that you learn nothing.

But if you quit all jobs precisely because you are not learning something 100% of the time, you will never be able to stay in a job long enough to advance (and thus have more autonomy and time to learn rather than do housework). .

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