I am 21 years old and I want to be a pilot. Is it too late to be a pilot?

Updated on : December 7, 2021 by Roland Nielsen



I am 21 years old and I want to be a pilot. Is it too late to be a pilot?

Absolutely not. I recently put together a detailed video on this topic. I recommend that you watch it to get a complete idea of ​​this profession. In the last part of this video (Part 3), you will find some of the lesser known facts about this profession - the NOT SO GLAMOROUS side of aviation. Knowing these risks early on will help you make an informed decision.

Greetings.

Not at all. Go ahead, this is the perfect time to start your training. I know people who have started their training at the age of 30 and have still gotten airline pilot jobs. It is only your passion that matters.

All the best :)

Yes, I can tell you that it is very difficult. It may be easier if you start at a young age. What makes flying challenging is that it requires academic knowledge and skills. Many things we try to do in life require one or the other, but flying requires both. It takes a lot of study to learn all the rules, all the knowledge about how the airplane works. It helps if you have a technical background or an engineering degree. It takes physical and mental skill to fly the plane. Perhaps if you spend a lot of time playing video games, that part of your brain will be well developed. Physical c is needed

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Yes, I can tell you that it is very difficult. It may be easier if you start at a young age. What makes flying challenging is that it requires academic knowledge and skills. Many things we try to do in life require one or the other, but flying requires both. It takes a lot of study to learn all the rules, all the knowledge about how the airplane works. It helps if you have a technical background or an engineering degree. It takes physical and mental skill to fly the plane. Perhaps if you spend a lot of time playing video games, that part of your brain will be well developed. It takes physical courage to fly an airplane. You have to have guts…. When you fly a small plane, you have to face the fact that if you make a mistake, you could commit suicide. If you fly a large plane, you could kill hundreds of people. Then….

I have done many challenging things in my life. I have surfed big waves, I have climbed some high mountains, I have climbed some big walls. I even survived a great white shark bite, if you can believe it. But…. I can tell you that learning to fly instruments was the most challenging skill I have ever tried to develop. Flying the plane, navigating, talking on the radio and managing the lists is really difficult. Maybe for other people it is easier, but I can tell you that it is a difficult skill. You have to fight the claustrophobic sensations of the sight-limiting device, you have to stay calm somehow, and divert, navigate, communicate. This was on a small plane. A bigger plane was easier as it's more about the autopilot,

To add to the challenge, you have the various permutations on which seat you are sitting in, what role you are playing. Sometimes the pilot flying is in the left seat, sometimes it is the right seat. Sometimes you are a follow-up pilot. In his early stages he will always be the first mate, the captain comes later.

All of this would be easier if everything worked as expected all the time, but you have to be prepared for things to fail. Like motors, hydraulic pumps, flight controls, radios, computers. The modern airplane is reliable, but pilots earn their pay when things go wrong.

A modern airliner is a very complex machine, with many interacting systems. It is automated and has many redundant systems. This makes it more reliable and easier to operate in daily operations. This means that once you are an airline pilot, your life is easier and you are much more likely to deliver your passengers without much drama. It also means that it is difficult to learn how to become an airline pilot, because you have to understand how the airplane will behave with and without automation working. You must understand how the aircraft will function if some or all of the redundant systems fail.

For example, an airliner may have 3 hydraulic pumps. Two are motor driven and one is electrically powered. Each of these bombs is used for different parts of the plane. So maybe if pump number one fails and you lose hydraulic pressure in that system, you will lose the internal ailerons on one side. You can still fly and control the plane, but it will fly differently. You must be able to quickly understand what the plane is telling you and understand what it means. And they do a lot of testing to make sure you really understand these things before you fly passengers. Those tests are difficult to pass.

In some cases, airplanes can be started and rolled with either engine. But if you ride on the wrong engine, you don't have a normal braking system. You may realize this right after hearing expensive crunching noises.

You do not need to have a degree in mechanical or electronic systems engineering to be an airline pilot. My opinion is that if there is anything that is preventing you from earning that title, an airline pilot may not be the correct career choice.

Edit my answer: I see some reported answers from real professional pilots. I appreciate the contribution and fully respect their achievement.

As a pilot trains, the training is different depending on who pays for it. Do you want to become an airline pilot? There are many organizations that will train you. If you are paying, they will provide you with a price based on the legal minimum required flight and training hours. If you are very talented, you may be able to pass the required tests in that amount of time and training. But ... most people need a little more. Or much more. So they pay more and progress. Everything is fine.

When you get to commercial, multi, instrument and 1000 to 1500 hours, you can apply to an airline in the US You go into their training program, and it's very fast, very competitive. They are trying to educate people and rank them equally. The law of supply and demand has some (but limited) impact on its toughness.

You may be a reasonably smart person, a perfectly good pilot, but if you can't handle the rhythm of this show or navigate politics, you're back on the street.

Many successful pilots are talking about how things were for them. That was probably a long time ago. Pilots flying airliners today learned to fly in an era of simpler aircraft. They learned their flying skills, and when more complex airplanes appeared, their learning was an incremental process. They learned some new technology, but they didn't have to learn to be airline pilots as part of that process. They already knew how to operate as a two-man crew, how to fly within the IFR system.

If you talk to an airline pilot and ask how difficult the training was, they may tell you that it was not that difficult. What they mean is: it wasn't that difficult for them personally. They were successful, because they had the right level of talent and motivation, the right work ethic. They did what was asked of them. They went through the small hole, overcame all obstacles. The really important question is: "How difficult will it be for you?" Everyone starts off with confidence, they expect to be above average. The reality is generally different.

The operation of any aircraft is aligned with the laws of physics. And so it's mostly about common sense. There are many rules, but these rules tell you not to do things that are not safe. So no smart person does these things. When you operate safely and legally, it is simple. But… .. going from the training phase to the operation phase is difficult, because it involves abnormal operations, emergency conditions, one in a million things.

Someone could say: "Anyone can become an airline pilot, it is simply a matter of perseverance." I do not agree. After the Colgan Air accident, changes were made. There are many people on the planet who cannot drive a car. These people are unlikely to become airline pilots.

If you are a persistent and intelligent person with a lot of funds, you can go a long way towards your goal, but success is far from guaranteed. It takes more than perseverance, more than money, more than talent. Many of the three are needed.

Let's look at this realistically. Let's say you REALLY want to become an airline pilot, you don't have a family to support, and you don't mind living a relatively low standard of living (for an American) for a few years to get there.

The initial training would cost you around $ 100k. However, there is a lot of variation on this. Do you attend a formal “Part 141” school? Do you train at the local airport and pay it little by little along the way? Do you do the ground school on your own, buy your own plane (with the intention of selling it later for close to the purchase price)?

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Let's look at this realistically. Let's say you REALLY want to become an airline pilot, you don't have a family to support, and you don't mind living a relatively low standard of living (for an American) for a few years to get there.

The initial training would cost you around $ 100k. However, there is a lot of variation on this. Do you attend a formal “Part 141” school? Do you train at the local airport and pay it little by little along the way? Do you do the ground school on your own, buy your own aircraft (with the intention of selling it later for close to the purchase price) and hire an instructor for those parts that require it? However, for simplicity, let's go with $ 100k and a year.

That is the training. You get the certificates, but not a real job. No one will hire a man with only 250 hours. It's not even insurable until it hits 500 hours. So now you have to accumulate another 1,250 hours towards your airline transportation pilot certificate. Most people instruct. Some may rent for another 250 hours (this is where the "buy your own plane" option becomes attractive) and tow banners or gliders, watch traffic, and so on. Let's say it takes 2 more years to get ATP.

Once you get the 1500 magic hours and your ATP, you can apply for a regional airline. The good news is that there is a real shortage of pilots these days (finally!) And landing a job shouldn't be too difficult. Even if three don't hire you, given the current weather, there will be a fourth. You will get a job. Yes, it pays for peanuts but you have to pay your fees (and loans). After 3 years, you will have the skills, experience, and logged hours to be hired by a major airline.

They will want an absolute minimum of 3 years on your part to recoup their costs, to make the training worth it.

Therefore, we are looking for a minimum of 6 years to go from zero to the correct seat in a major airline and the last thing you can embark on on this journey and do airline work is approximately 56 years. However, if you start that late, you will never make a big income. Even on the major airlines, the first year of pay is still a peanut, but it increases very quickly after that. So the earlier you start, the more you earn in total. Remember, you still have that initial $ 100k that you have to pay.

Once there, it could take 2 years to become a Captain, or it could take 15-20 years, depending on your wear and tear and growth.

The good news is that you don't have to stop flying at 65 - you just can't work for a major airline anymore. There are many corporate jobs and other flight opportunities for retirees.

You will be surprised to know everything you need to know before becoming a pilot! I don't want to scare you but the list is endless!

  1. You have to know how to fly!
  2. You have to know engineering. Remember that you don't have the engineer on board when something goes wrong. You may not know how to fix it, but you need to know how it affects your aircraft and how to mitigate the situation.
  3. You have to know the weather. How can you fly before you know what is going on there and why?
  4. When you're moving almost at the speed of sound, you need to know some math. How else do you propose to calculate the time
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You will be surprised to know everything you need to know before becoming a pilot! I don't want to scare you but the list is endless!

  1. You have to know how to fly!
  2. You have to know engineering. Remember that you don't have the engineer on board when something goes wrong. You may not know how to fix it, but you need to know how it affects your aircraft and how to mitigate the situation.
  3. You have to know the weather. How can you fly before you know what is going on there and why?
  4. When you're moving almost at the speed of sound, you need to know some math. How else do you propose to calculate the time and fuel required to reach your destination?
  5. You must know the regulations, lest you lose your license. The worst thing that can happen to you is a collision from being in a place where you are not supposed to be! As soon as you think you have understood the regulation, you will find another interpretation or perspective.
  6. You have to know the psychology. Crew resource management is the cool name for aviation psychology. He got to know the temperament not only of his cabin and the cabin crew, but also of the ATC and the guys in the company. Also, it must be beyond distractions or annoyances. In short, you are expected to be a yogi!
  7. He got to know aerodynamics, that is, the physics of the plane. It is pure physics and it is extremely interesting!
  8. He got to know at least a part of aeronautical medicine. How your hearing works and how movement and pressure changes affect it, how your eye works and how it affects day or night, how your body reacts to disturbances in the circadian cycle - these are just a few examples. expected of you in the medical field.
  9. Above all, you must know Murphy's Laws. What is least expected will happen. When you make a mistake, it will show, etc. In aviation we call it flight safety!
  10. You are expected to know the behavior of birds! Yes! How else do you propose to avoid them? Get to know your ornithology better!
  11. Above all you have to know that the aircraft and the environment have no respect for your age, experience and time in the cabin. You make a mistake and you pay for it.
  12. Your license is subject to an infinite number of challenges! You have aptitude tests every six months, medical check-ups every six months and surprise checks by DGCA inspectors are enough. One wrong step and you will lose your license and your livelihood!
  13. Obtaining the license costs a lot of money and effort. If you don't use it, you lose it. Which means that if you don't get a flight job, your license can be invalidated in no time. To keep it alive you have to fly paying.

Let me tell you that many people are overcoming all of these challenges and surviving in the world of aviation. You also can!

Be mentally prepared for the wedding with books. You have to study a lot. By the time you learn about an airplane, you will be asked to switch to a larger, more complex airplane. Regulations change frequently and are very important. You will have a lot of evidence to appear to be selected or to keep the license alive. So be a book worm.

Do it all 100%. Don't compromise on quality or safety. Security is a way of thinking. The sooner you get it, the better it will be for you.

Save money. You don't know when you will need it. Job safety is not a word found in the aviation dictionary.

If you love flying with passion, all the hard work will seem easy. If you come just for money or jazz, you will be disappointed. So find out for yourself if you love flying so much!

I hope you know both sides of the coin! Happy flight!

I am probably one of the oldest people who has seriously tried to become an airline pilot. I am currently 58 years old. He wanted the experience of flying airplanes and was not very concerned about recovering the costs involved or even covering the expenses. I obtained the required qualifications (commercial multi-instrument) and the required number of hours (1500) to enter the training program at a regional US airline. When I entered the class, I realized that I was probably the least qualified person of the room, in terms of experience. I was surrounded by people who had much more experience in professional pilots.

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I am probably one of the oldest people who has seriously tried to become an airline pilot. I am currently 58 years old. He wanted the experience of flying airplanes and was not very concerned about recovering the costs involved or even covering the expenses. I obtained the required qualifications (commercial multi-instrument) and the required number of hours (1500) to enter the training program at a regional US airline. When I entered the class, I realized that I was probably the least qualified person of the room, in terms of experience. I was surrounded by people who had much more experience as a professional pilot than I did. Many of the people were already seasoned jet pilots due to military or other experience. Many of my fellow students graduated from college flight training programs that gave them a lot of knowledge about airplanes, even if they hadn't logged flight hours. I found my age to be a significant handicap in terms of my ability to learn quickly and have the energy for long hours of training and study. If you want to become a professional pilot, start while your brain is flexible and your eyesight sharp. I was able to learn the material, but not at the required speed. A younger person can learn more quickly and that is what you need to be successful in an airline. If you are not willing to leave your home, do a job that begins in another city, does not start on the air route. If you want to become a professional pilot, It starts as long as your brain is flexible and your eyesight sharp. I was able to learn the material, but not at the required speed. A younger person can learn more quickly and that is what you need to be successful in an airline. If you are not willing to leave your home, do a job that begins in another city, does not start on the air route. If you want to become a professional pilot, start while your brain is flexible and your eyesight sharp. I was able to learn the material, but not at the required speed. A younger person can learn more quickly and that is what you need to be successful in an airline. If you are not willing to leave your home, do a job that begins in another city, does not start on the air route. A younger person can learn more quickly and that is what you need to be successful in an airline. If you are not willing to leave your home, do a job that begins in another city, does not start on the air route. If you want to become a professional pilot, start while your brain is flexible and your eyesight sharp. I was able to learn the material, but not at the required speed. A younger person can learn more quickly and that is what you need to be successful in an airline. If you are not willing to leave your home, do a job that begins in another city, does not start on the air route. A younger person can learn more quickly and that is what you need to be successful in an airline. If you are not willing to leave your home, do a job that begins in another city, does not start on the air route. If you want to become a professional pilot, start while your brain is flexible and your eyesight sharp. I was able to learn the material, but not at the required speed. A younger person can learn more quickly and that is what you need to be successful in an airline. If you are not willing to leave your home, do a job that begins in another city, does not start on the air route. If you want to become a professional pilot, start while your brain is flexible and your eyesight sharp. I was able to learn the material, but not at the required speed. A younger person can learn more quickly and that is what you need to be successful in an airline. If you are not willing to leave your home, do a job that begins in another city, does not start on the air route. If you want to become a professional pilot, start while your brain is flexible and your eyesight sharp. I was able to learn the material, but not at the required speed. A younger person can learn more quickly and that is what you need to be successful in an airline. If you are not willing to leave your home, do a job that begins in another city, does not start on the air route.

Here's an edit, based on a reflection after a period of time. An airline could hire a senior pilot if he meets all the requirements and can give a decent interview. But ... maybe they don't have a real plan for an old man to fly their planes. They cannot legally reject an older, but fully qualified pilot. They would be subjected to lawsuits for age discrimination. So ... the old man is admitted to the stressful and punishing training program. Anyone who has passed more than one mock test knows that if an examiner wants to fail you, it is easy for them to do so for technical reasons. Hardly anyone can fly perfect all the time. So ... if they want to fail you, it's a simple process. They give you a test, they point out your mistakes, you go home.

The whole process becomes more complicated because there is a union involved. They are always negotiating hard. The union represents and supports the people who are currently part of the union. Those pilots who are actively flying as fully qualified pilots for the airline. Now…. If there were any processes that could completely disrupt the supply of new pilots, who would benefit? Of course, it could be the union members. They could negotiate higher wages. So ... wow, the training standards suddenly became very strict. Hardly anyone could get through the training process. They get rid of the older and weaker drivers first.

After a while, they have to start looking for reasons to reject other pilots. Now ... these are well qualified people. US Navy Combat Instructor Pilots Air Force Veterans. Pilots who have flown for US Customs These are men with many thousands of hours, these are some of the best pilots in the world. And yet, somehow, they seem unable to overcome the punitive training system. Humiliating….

OK, yes, I failed. And it was okay, because I'm really not a good enough pilot to fly for airlines. Those with younger, sharper brains should be doing the job. I dont have a problem with that. Those other guys? They should have gotten their stripes with less trouble.

The airline that was my experience? They failed and ceased operations during the Covid 19 pandemic. Ruined. I don't feel much sorry for them as a corporation. I feel bad for the people who were unemployed.

Hmm, the other three answers state that they either developed an interest or love for flying when they were very young, or the 17-year-old glider student who IS very young. :-)

For me it was the same. But, full disclosure, I'm about to answer, "Why did I want to be a pilot?" No "Why me ...?" Because I'm already a pilot.

Both of my parents were commercially qualified pilots (not airline pilots) and owned a Piper Aircraft dealership / distribution in Phoenix AZ. So for my sister and I flying in small planes was the norm. I think the first time I ever flew on a general aviation plane

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Hmm, the other three answers state that they either developed an interest or love for flying when they were very young, or the 17-year-old glider student who IS very young. :-)

For me it was the same. But, full disclosure, I'm about to answer, "Why did I want to be a pilot?" No "Why me ...?" Because I'm already a pilot.

Both of my parents were commercially qualified pilots (not airline pilots) and owned a Piper Aircraft dealership / distribution in Phoenix AZ. So for my sister and I flying in small planes was the norm. I think the first time I flew in a general aviation plane I was 3 weeks old.

But just because my parents loved flying doesn't mean that my sister or I inherited that same love. Well I did. But my sister didn't. He hated flying and still does.

On the other hand, I started building model airplanes when I was around 10 years old. If I remember correctly, it had roughly 180 model airplanes (well, including some ships) and a massive three-foot-long Graff Zeppelin. I had so many models that my parents installed custom shelving in my room to store them all. The Zeppelin was placed on the ledge above my bedroom window.

What may have cemented my love of flying was that my dad gave me a couple dozen flight magazines from the 1940s. He may well have learned to read from those magazines. By the way, not only do I still have them, I have added them to the collection over the years.

When I finished my degree and got a high paying job, I decided I needed a plane. So I sold my car (a Porsche 928), rode my motorcycle, and bought a Piper Comanche.

I flew it for 23 years, I bought a Piper Malibu that I flew for 5 years, and I currently have a Columbia 400 that I have owned for 10 years.

Interestingly, I have never worked in the aviation industry, although I did work in the aerospace industry at a company called Rotary Rocket. Rotary Rocket - Wikipedia But I have commercial classifications for single and multi-engine land and sea aircraft. And I've logged time on 66 different models or types of aircraft, including various WWII aircraft.

Flying is so in my blood that after a few years of writing articles for three computer magazines, I started writing for aviation magazines. Since then, I have published 160 articles in five different aviation journals and my aviation library consists of around 100 aviation-related books.

The point of all this was to show how pervasive the love of flying is and how it can take up a lot of space in your life if you allow it.

I didn't let him, he guided me.

There are good pilot jobs (less every day) and bad pilot jobs (more every day).

For real work, if the weather is nice, nothing breaks, the autopilot works, you like your copilot and everything goes according to schedule ... it's a pretty easy job.

It also depends on what you consider good. What is important for you?

  • Quality of life
  • Free time
  • I treat as a human being
  • Or something else


If you pay 100k + for training (plus college if you want a shot at a major airline) and then work for less than 20K on net pay while away from home 18-23 days a month, then regionals (which are generally unions) are

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There are good pilot jobs (less every day) and bad pilot jobs (more every day).

For real work, if the weather is nice, nothing breaks, the autopilot works, you like your copilot and everything goes according to schedule ... it's a pretty easy job.

It also depends on what you consider good. What is important for you?

  • Quality of life
  • Free time
  • I treat as a human being
  • Or something else


If you pay 100k + for training (plus college if you want a shot at a major airline) and then work for less than 20K on your take-home salary while away from home 18-23 days a month, then regionals ( which are generally union) are for you. They are hiring now.

Regional "happiness" is almost non-existent (even for a new driver after about a year). The pay and working conditions are so bad that it is creating a shortage of pilots at that level. I know many people who flew away after several years of misery on various regional airlines.

After many years, you may go on to a major where the job is much better, but not like it was 20 years ago.

Today, more than 50% of flights are operated by regional airlines, your chance of reaching one of the main ones is less than ever. The current practice of "selling" pilots in regional airline jobs as a "stepping stone" and using that to justify horrible treatment, poor pay and horrible quality of life is failing. The pilots are quitting and finding a new line of work.

You will hear about the pilot shortage. It is not true. Anyone who pays a good salary and treats their pilots well has qualified people lining up to work for them.

If good = happy then:

I know several major airline pilots who are happy with their work. Most seem satisfied even though they long for "yesterday."

In my experience, a higher percentage of corporate pilots seem to be happy with their work (as long as they work for a good company).

The satisfaction of charter pilots also seems to be linked to the company they work for.

I don't know anyone on regional airlines who is happy. I have a friend who just quit. Between the emergency platform and other work expenses, his wife had to pay for him to be an airline pilot! That is just a shame in my opinion. Did I mention he was home for only seven days some months?

Why not? In my experience, many pilots don't even start training until their early twenties. I didn't start my own training until I was 33 years old. If it's something you really want to do, don't let anyone stop you. However, it would be my recommendation that you make sure that it is what you want to do. It is expensive and the salaries are not huge during the early years of this career. I always advise people to visit a flight school and do what is called a "demo flight." They generally cost around $ 100. As I am a helicopter pilot, I highly recommend doing a demonstration flight in an airplane a

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Why not? In my experience, many pilots don't even start training until their early twenties. I didn't start my own training until I was 33 years old. If it's something you really want to do, don't let anyone stop you. However, it would be my recommendation that you make sure that it is what you want to do. It is expensive and the salaries are not huge during the early years of this career. I always advise people to visit a flight school and do what is called a "demo flight." They generally cost around $ 100. As I am a helicopter pilot, I highly recommend doing a demo flight in an airplane and a helicopter. Just to see if you like to fly. It's certainly an easier pill to swallow when you're only paying $ 100 and discovering that maybe flying isn't for you. You have to find out after spending several hundred or even thousands of dollars and lots of headaches / butt / neck pain. Also, keep in mind that flight training is expensive. Even more so for helicopters.

If this is a dream of yours, follow it. I leave you with one of my favorite (and absolutely true) quotes from Leonardo Da Vinci,

“Once you have tasted flight, you will walk the earth forever with your eyes turned to the sky. Because there you have been, and there you will always yearn to return. "

Good luck and safe flight!

If all children listened to their parents' concerns about their chosen careers, the world would be a much less interesting (and much less advanced) place. As long as you have the passion and knowledge to find success in the situation, chances are you will.

Your parents are not totally wrong with their concerns. The first days of riding are difficult and you are not well compensated. Your work-life balance will lean heavily towards work and compensation will not provide a very comfortable lifestyle for some time to come. But guess that? This is not uncommon for people who come straight out of cabbage.

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If all children listened to their parents' concerns about their chosen careers, the world would be a much less interesting (and much less advanced) place. As long as you have the passion and knowledge to find success in the situation, chances are you will.

Your parents are not totally wrong with their concerns. The first days of riding are difficult and you are not well compensated. Your work-life balance will lean heavily towards work and compensation will not provide a very comfortable lifestyle for some time to come. But guess that? This is not uncommon for people just out of college or training. Ask a few successful professionals and most will tell you that they worked hard and had trouble paying their bills in the infancy of their careers.

In 2011, the death rate for professional pilots was 56.1 per 100,000 workers, which is quite high until you remember that the figure also includes pilots who fly sprayers, Alaskan planes, etc. A while).

That said, the United States faces a looming shortage of pilots. The Big 4 airlines have a relatively solid financial base compared to 10 years ago. Certainly there are less favorable industries to dabble in.

The question is, will your passion for flying sustain you through tough times? If the answer is yes, go ahead! If you're not so sure, fly to the side and keep your day job a little more grounded.

If you mean an online college degree, I'd say yes.

Major airlines care more about the flight experience and a clean track record along with ANY college degree. That's just to get the interview. If one is invited to an interview, the airline WANTS to hire them.

The goal is to get the interview.

Airline applicants are not ranked based on the university they attended, but if two candidates have exactly the same qualifications and one does not have a degree, the candidate with a degree will get the interview.

If you want to be a commercial pilot, you are not late. You can go training now too. The only requirement is that you have had mathematics and physics in your 10 + 2 in the main subjects and have passed them with a minimum of 55 points in each one.

But you are late if you want to be a pilot in the Air Force, since you cannot take the NDA exam (it takes place right after the 12th). But now, you can write the CDS or AFCAT exams to join the IAF, the age limit is 24 years.

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