I always wanted to be a doctor, but couldn't. How should I deal with this?

Updated on : December 7, 2021 by Kian Barnes



I always wanted to be a doctor, but couldn't. How should I deal with this?

You are not alone. My dad is a well known ophthalmologist in India. Since I was little I wanted to become like him. He was smart enough but not talented enough to land a government medical position. It is very competitive and the seats are less. I did manage to get a seat at BDS though. Dental surgeon? In no way did I not want to become one. I repeated and prepared for the previous medical exam ... but I couldn't pass. Dad was a professor at a private university and he offered to enter the same considered university, which would have cost us a fortune that I ran. This happened in 2005. Instead, I admitted

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You are not alone. My dad is a well known ophthalmologist in India. Since I was little I wanted to become like him. He was smart enough but not talented enough to land a government medical position. It is very competitive and the seats are less. I did manage to get a seat at BDS though. Dental surgeon? In no way did I not want to become one. I repeated and prepared for the previous medical exam ... but I couldn't pass. Dad was a professor at a private university and he offered to enter the same considered university, which would have cost us a fortune that I ran. This happened in 2005. Instead, I got admitted to Biotechnology and then got an MBA in international business and marketing (this time a government seat). The money I invested in my career was less than 2-3 lakh. I was placed in a biotech company and since then I have been doing good and living with dignity. Looking down the lane and in my current situation, I think I have made the right decision. My instinct tells me that I am in the best possible field that really suits my personality and interest. The life of a doctor in the current situation is not as good as it used to be in previous days. All the other students want to become doctors. You need to know yourself and select a field that you think suits you. Many of my friends did MBBS from Pvt. Institutes and government as well. Trust me, they are under tremendous pressure. PG, internships, hospital implantation and endless competition. Not becoming a doctor is not the end of the world. Life is too short to regret and regret things you did not receive. Go ahead and all the best !!! My instinct tells me that I am in the best possible field that really suits my personality and interest. The life of a doctor in the current situation is not as good as it used to be in previous days. All the other students want to become doctors. You need to know yourself and select a field that you think suits you. Many of my friends did MBBS from Pvt. Institutes and government as well. Trust me, they are under tremendous pressure. PG, internships, hospital implantation and endless competition. Not becoming a doctor is not the end of the world. Life is too short to regret and regret things you did not receive. Go ahead and all the best !!! My instinct tells me that I am in the best possible field that really suits my personality and interest. The life of a doctor in the current situation is not as good as it used to be in previous days. All the other students want to become doctors. You need to know yourself and select a field that you think suits you. Many of my friends did MBBS from Pvt. Institutes and government as well. Trust me, they are under tremendous pressure. PG, internships, hospital implantation and endless competition. Not becoming a doctor is not the end of the world. Life is too short to regret and regret things you did not receive. Go ahead and all the best !!! You need to know yourself and select a field that you think suits you. Many of my friends did MBBS from Pvt. Institutes and government as well. Trust me, they are under tremendous pressure. PG, internships, hospital implantation and endless competition. Not becoming a doctor is not the end of the world. Life is too short to regret and regret things you did not receive. Go ahead and all the best !!! You need to know yourself and select a field that you think suits you. Many of my friends did MBBS from Pvt. Institutes and government as well. Trust me, they are under tremendous pressure. PG, internships, hospital implantation and endless competition. Not becoming a doctor is not the end of the world. Life is too short to regret and regret things you did not receive. Go ahead and all the best !!! Institutes and government too. Trust me, they are under tremendous pressure. PG, internships, hospital implantation and endless competition. Not becoming a doctor is not the end of the world. Life is too short to regret and regret things you did not receive. Go ahead and all the best !!! Institutes and government too. Trust me, they are under tremendous pressure. PG, internships, hospital implantation and endless competition. Not becoming a doctor is not the end of the world. Life is too short to regret and regret things you did not receive. Go ahead and all the best !!!

Hello there

I am a doctor by profession.

Trust me, I was flabbergasted when I got my seat at MBBS, while my friend didn't. I felt bad for her.

But five years later….

I was still studying and she had already started working with a decent salary.

Ten years down ...

I was still studying, I did my PhD, trying scholarships, a salary to take care of the essentials and she is fully established with a high salary and settled abroad in the country of her choice.

I seriously believe, undertake any profession and do your best. In a way, it's good that you didn't get it. As much as I've struggled to be a doctor, it's easy for people

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Hello there

I am a doctor by profession.

Trust me, I was flabbergasted when I got my seat at MBBS, while my friend didn't. I felt bad for her.

But five years later….

I was still studying and she had already started working with a decent salary.

Ten years down ...

I was still studying, I did my PhD, trying scholarships, a salary to take care of the essentials and she is fully established with a high salary and settled abroad in the country of her choice.

I seriously believe, undertake any profession and do your best. In a way, it's good that you didn't get it. As much as you've struggled to be a doctor, it's easy for people to tarnish your reputation.

If serving was your motto, you can do it through any profession.

I hope that helps.

If it's any consolation, you sure would have been a terrible psychiatrist;)

Jokes aside, instead of wanting you should have tried.
I have no idea why you couldn't ...

If your current condition doesn't allow you to try again .. Let go .. Keep going .. Focus on your skills and work on your next goal .. Good luck :)

First, you need to determine what your motivations are in life. There are many other professions that can fulfill these needs and / or many auxiliary jobs that offer the same satisfactions as a doctor. It is difficult to become a doctor and even many qualified people will not have the opportunity to do so. Find another field that brings you satisfaction.

I know a family in which almost all of them are doctors. The father was a doctor and 6 of his 7 children are also. About two years ago my family was having dinner with this family when we started talking about the medical field (at the time I wanted to become a medical assistant). To our surprise, all 6 doctors agreed that they would not seek a doctor if they had to do it again. They felt it was just not worth it. Now these were all successful, established, and respected doctors, not some bitter exhausted ones. They provided good reasoning to support their claim:

  • Education: training to become a doctor
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I know a family in which almost all of them are doctors. The father was a doctor and 6 of his 7 children are also. About two years ago my family was having dinner with this family when we started talking about the medical field (at the time I wanted to become a medical assistant). To our surprise, all 6 doctors agreed that they would not seek a doctor if they had to do it again. They felt it was just not worth it. Now these were all successful, established, and respected doctors, not some bitter exhausted ones. They provided good reasoning to support their claim:

  • Education: training to become a Physician will consume 8 solid years of your youth, with very little time for anything else. Course work and workload are the most difficult of any educational path you can choose, in addition to high-level research in math or science. The cost of this education can run into the hundreds of thousands of dollars, which means that most doctors graduate with enormous debt. Additionally, admissions to medical schools have become increasingly competitive. Only students with perfect grades, extracurricular and a + 95% MCAT will be accepted in the really prestigious schools. An "average" medical student (still a Valedictorian by most standards) you could end up spending 4 years in a grade C school in rural Iowa, if you're lucky. And without a "good" medical school credential in your name, your career is already limited. I met an excellent student with near-perfect grades, who spent two solid years after college applying to every medical school she could find. Nobody accepted it. It's that competitive. Don't even try it unless you know you're smart enough to master high-level chemistry classes all day. If you drop out of med school, you're screwed. You get all the debt without purchasing power and your reputation is ruined. And without a "good" medical school credential in your name, your career is already limited. I met an excellent student with near-perfect grades, who spent two solid years after college applying to every medical school she could find. Nobody accepted it. It's that competitive. Don't even try it unless you know you're smart enough to master high-level chemistry classes all day. If you drop out of med school, you're screwed. You get all the debt without purchasing power and your reputation is ruined. And without a "good" medical school credential in your name, your career is already limited. I met an excellent student with near-perfect grades, who spent two solid years after college applying to every medical school she could find. Nobody accepted it. It's that competitive. Don't even try it unless you know you're smart enough to master high-level chemistry classes all day. If you drop out of med school, you're screwed. You get all the debt without purchasing power and your reputation is ruined. who spent two solid years after college applying to every medical school he could find. Nobody accepted it. It's that competitive. Don't even try it unless you know you're smart enough to master high-level chemistry classes all day. If you drop out of med school, you're screwed. You get all the debt without purchasing power and your reputation is ruined. who spent two solid years after college applying to every medical school he could find. Nobody accepted it. It's that competitive. Don't even try it unless you know you're smart enough to master high-level chemistry classes all day. If you drop out of med school, you're screwed. You get all the debt without purchasing power and your reputation is ruined.
  • Residency: You thought medical school was the hard part, huh? Well, after graduation, expect to spend 3-4 years as a resident physician-in-training, which by many reports is the worst part of the entire process. There is basically no limit to how many hours residents can work, or how little they are paid. Senior doctors are often verbally abusive and will throw undue heavy lifting on you. You are expected to perform the duties of a full physician, but without any of the benefits. In reality, limits were placed on residents hours after a high-profile death of a patient in the 1980s due to an error caused by lack of sleep. The limits they imposed? No more than 24 consecutive hours and no more than 80 total hours per week. Yes, that's the "
  • The Pay: What's wrong with this part? Doctors make a lot of money, right? Well, something like that. Doctors get low or medium numbers of 6, generally between 120,000 and 300,000 per year for general practitioners. High-level surgeons and specialists can earn between 300 and 500k, but that's around the upper limit, with some outliers. It's good money, sure, but you could earn as much or more as a corporate attorney, and law school is 3 years for medical school / residency 8. The same goes for a master's in business or finance, or you could invest the The time, effort, and capital of your education to start a business or mutual fund, which could be even more profitable in the long run. Therefore, Doctors are paid very little compared to the training they receive and the intelligence and work ethic they bring. And let's not forget that educational debt! Even at 200k, you will be paying that interest for years. And with the recurring costs of certification, malpractice insurance, and continuing education, you may never really feel rich.
  • Job satisfaction: Becoming a doctor is hard, really hard. Medical school is basically rings 6 through 9 in Dante's Inferno. But everyone knows this, and students enter the field with an idea of ​​the challenges that lie ahead. So even with all the work, insomnia, and expense, it's worth it in the end because doctors save lives, right? What could be more rewarding than that? Well, as Bob Dylan says, "times are a change." New practices in the HMO-managed medical industry are slowly but surely squeezing the joy out of the medical profession. For example, many healthcare systems have truly idiotic requirements for physicians to approve almost everything their subordinates do. In California, a registered nurse can't even start an IV without a doctor's approval. Now the nurses are teacher phlebotomists. They could start an IV drunk and blindfolded on the deck of the Titanic. But somehow, a doctor has to come to sign every time, or you risk bigger problems. When I volunteered at a hospital, I witnessed doctors running from place to place all day, just signing things. They did not get to do procedures. They were unable to speak to the patients. It was mainly the nurses who did these things, while the doctors used their 8 years of education to check the boxes. It was actually very sad, but at least they were getting a good workout. They were unable to speak to the patients. It was mainly the nurses who did these things, while the doctors used their 8 years of education to check the boxes. It was actually very sad, but at least they were getting a good workout. They were unable to speak to the patients. It was mainly the nurses who did these things, while the doctors used their 8 years of education to check the boxes. It was actually very sad, but at least they were getting a good workout. It was mainly the nurses who did these things, while the doctors used their 8 years of education to check the boxes. It was actually very sad, but at least they were getting a good workout. It was mainly the nurses who did these things, while the doctors used their 8 years of education to check the boxes. It was actually very sad, but at least they were getting a good workout.

In short, I cannot recommend the doctor's way to anyone. It is simply too difficult, too expensive, and in the end, it pays poorly. Fortunately, there are many more reasonable careers available in the medical field. You can become a physician assistant or nurse practitioner with just a master's degree; you don't even need a bachelor's degree in biochemistry or anything, just a few prerequisites. There are also master's degrees in anesthesiology and magnetic resonance surgery. All these jobs pay 6 figures. Nursing school is also a good investment, although it is now very competitive. However, any of these would be preferable to the barefoot trail of broken glass and Legos that is the path to becoming a doctor.

In chronological order, my opinion about whether I should have studied medicine changed.

16 years old: wanted to be a lawyer, engineer, mathematician

18 years old - happy to get medical school on full scholarship, mostly "relying" on suggestions from parents and peers

19 years old: hated medical school. The topics were mostly "imprecise", with no definite concrete answers, unlike mathematics and physics. I wonder if it's too late to stop wasting a year studying medicine.

Ages 20-23 - Same as above, I'm not doing well in prescribed subjects, most of which I consider unworthy of my brain anyway. But as each year went by, it felt like it was more and more

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In chronological order, my opinion about whether I should have studied medicine changed.

16 years old: wanted to be a lawyer, engineer, mathematician

18 years old - happy to get medical school on full scholarship, mostly "relying" on suggestions from parents and peers

19 years old: hated medical school. The topics were mostly "imprecise", with no definite concrete answers, unlike mathematics and physics. I wonder if it's too late to stop wasting a year studying medicine.

Ages 20-23 - Same as above, I'm not doing well in prescribed subjects, most of which I consider unworthy of my brain anyway. But as the years went by, I felt like I was wasting more and more time if I quit at that time. He decided to focus on surgical studies, the least "shit" of all medical specialties.

24yo: first year as an intern. Earning some money for the first time, albeit mainly trading a lot of my (over) time for hourly pay, I won't do it again in hindsight - youth is worth a lot, and hourly pay as an intern is terrible, not at all it is worth considering that the money will come later as you get older.

25yo-26yo: focused on surgical specialty work. I joined the surgical training program to specialize. I got bored once I understood the "true nature" of surgery: long hours of cutting, burning, sewing. He suffered a quarter-life crisis. Leave your job full time.

Ages 27-29: He occasionally worked as a senior emergency department physician in a rural hospital for three times what he received when working full time. I found a role model in the department director's style of medical practice: the way he approached each patient, the way he solved each problem, confidence and style, etc. I decided to model my practice based on a similar attitude. I bought all the possible "toys" that my heart desired (within reason), but I also suffered intermittent bouts of depression due to the feeling of being "abandoned" compared to my medical colleagues who were preparing to become specialists, and compared to my high school friends who had had very appreciable success in the corporate world. I took many months away from work to travel, f-hang around and "find myself" / philosophize.

30 Years - Decided to accept a 70% pay cut to re-enter a “proper” public hospital job full time for a chance to apply to the highly competitive anesthesia training program. Extremely fortunate to enter the program in just 6 months after re-entering the “system”, due to the very good references I got from my 3 years of work at ED, and VERY lucky.

31-36 years: I felt that anesthesia is a specialty made for me, and I did. Extremely competent and confident at work and studying for the specialty exams felt more natural. She endured two lengthy and highly stressful periods of nearly full-time self-directed study (6 months each) in addition to full-time work, in order to prepare for two batches of major specialty exams, resulting in the severance of the relationship every time (among other reasons).

37 years until now: Practice as a private specialist anesthetist. Very good at what I do; very happy with my choice of specialty, which finally justifies the original decision to do medicine when I was 18, some 19 years later.

The point is that if you regret something, it changes over time. If you quit early, switch to something else, and find success there, you will always be celebrating your resignation as a good decision. If you didn't quit, and stood your ground, and finally find success like I did, you will be celebrating not quitting as a good decision.

Either way, you just need to be competent and persistent and eventually succeed; this would validate all your previous decisions.

Before it can be successful, it is naturally considered a "failure" or a "work in progress," so feelings of regret and doubt are natural. It is more important to focus on achieving success than regretting past decisions.

I'm not sure if most doctors want their children to become doctors too. I did my best to discourage all the young people who didn't know why they wanted to become doctors, especially my own.

So my son is a social media marketer, our daughter, after much hesitation, did medical school anyway, which she again felt she had to do, after a disappointment in engineering school. After getting his Ph.D., he knew that he would not find work in the only field he wanted to do: clinical genetics, so after much agonizing, after spending 12 years doing medicine, at 32 he quit and after looking for

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I'm not sure if most doctors want their children to become doctors too. I did my best to discourage all the young people who didn't know why they wanted to become doctors, especially my own.

So my son is a social media marketer, our daughter, after much hesitation, did medical school anyway, which she again felt she had to do, after a disappointment in engineering school. After getting his PhD, he knew that he would not find work in the only field he wanted to do: clinical genetics, so after much agonizing, after spending 12 years doing medicine, at 32 he quit and after looking for a suitable one. The work between clinical medicine and ICT started a new career as a data analyst, while learning to program, etc. The skills of his people that he acquired during his 5 years working at the academy proved very useful in his new role. We'll see where this second race will take her. She is really happy: with relatively low stress you can do it as you see fit as long as long deadlines are met, no problem for a well planned young lady like her, no one looks over their shoulder all the time even though they are new to the game After 3 months her first evaluation was excellent, having learned the "how" so quickly, she is doing her job well planned, fast and so efficient, which is why she is happy. On top of this, our previously shy and introverted little girl has grown into a confident young woman and has started talking about her career transition at tech conferences, also garnering a lot of approval. Having an understanding, intelligent, inquisitive, and personable lifelong spouse / boyfriend helps. In addition to this, our girl, previously shy and introverted, She has grown into a confident young woman and has started talking about her career transition at tech conferences, also garnering a lot of approval. Having an understanding, intelligent, inquisitive, and personable lifelong spouse / boyfriend helps. On top of this, our previously shy and introverted little girl has grown into a confident young woman and has started talking about her career transition at tech conferences, also garnering a lot of approval. Having an understanding, intelligent, inquisitive, and personable lifelong spouse / boyfriend helps. inquisitive and pleasant help. On top of this, our previously shy and introverted little girl has grown into a confident young woman and has started talking about her career transition at tech conferences, also garnering a lot of approval. Having an understanding, intelligent, inquisitive, and personable lifelong spouse / boyfriend helps. inquisitive and pleasant help. On top of this, our previously shy and introverted little girl has grown into a confident young woman and has started talking about her career transition at tech conferences, also garnering a lot of approval. Having an understanding, intelligent, inquisitive, and personable lifelong spouse / boyfriend helps.

EDIT September 2020 - Since then she has been hired to work for this new company DEAR: AI-Powered Healthcare Pathways for Personalized Continuous Care

My dad was a doctor, an ophthalmologist, he never told us what to do, but he showed how much he loved his profession, it so happened that his four children also became doctors, my older sister, a resident pathologist who stopped working. After having their babies, her late husband was a professor of pathology, who after working became a GP, working 16 hours a day 6 days a week, her five children became engineers (hoping to be able to have a normal family life), a radiologist brother, me an internist and the younger sister an allergist. I also seriously considered doing ophthalmology: low uselessness, high demand therefore good income, quite technical too; but I fell in love with very broad old-style internal medicine: many of us it is so difficult to find a vacancy, at first we did not make a lot of money, at first there was a lot of disadvantage due to continually improving my department including ICU later so even when it was not available to nurses it was still a very satisfying job. I found the technical aspect when doing many endoscopies (diagnostic laparoscopies also during the period prior to CT) and in the ICU.

Well, explaining it is quite difficult, although I will try why some (Indian) doctors suggest not to choose Medicine as a profession based on my experiences in the Indian medical fraternity.

1- No one before entering mbbs knows exactly what we are going to face once we are in it. Also, Bhai munna and internet videos do not do justice to the life we ​​live as a doctor. So once you're in it, your expectations of how fun life would be are dashed.

2- You have to study a lot. For example, an average doctor will spend 5 to 6 hours a day studying. This is after going to college and after attending.

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Well, explaining it is quite difficult, although I will try why some (Indian) doctors suggest not to choose Medicine as a profession based on my experiences in the Indian medical fraternity.

1- No one before entering mbbs knows exactly what we are going to face once we are in it. Also, Bhai munna and internet videos do not do justice to the life we ​​live as a doctor. So once you're in it, your expectations of how fun life would be are dashed.

2- You have to study a lot. For example, an average doctor will spend 5 to 6 hours a day studying. This is after going to college and after attending practices and lectures. That for 4.5 years.

3- Now, if you dedicate so much time to studies and medicine, you will not have another life than that. Also, you see your engineer friend relaxing and going on vacation.

4- You will have exam after exam. There will be a moment in your life when people will ask you what is happening in your life and you will answer them: "Exam".

5-Despite putting so much effort in this field, it will not be considered that you should call a doctor because you have not really excelled in anything. Then you will need to study for a few more years.

6- All of the above can be equated to a boat that is filling with water and you have a glass to remove all the water, certainly your boat will sink one day. In short, some days are definitely going to be bad, you will feel depressed.

7-Once you get depressed, you will do no good at anything, either in medicine (Mbbs) and you will suggest to people not to seek medicine as a carrier option.

8- After completing all your education, people will ask you to do a lot of charity and not win or they do not ask you for a fee. (We also have family to feed).

9- In government hospitals, we often see doctors (men and women, there is no gender problem here) being bitten by the mafia. Where the doctors are not to blame.

So yes …

Now the positives

10- There is no happiness in the world comparable to the happiness of seeing your patient improve. Some people have come to me and thanked me for saving their family members. Relatives of patients have offered my elders to come to their house for dinner just to treat their relatives and save their lives, which is actually our job. Words can never do justice to this happiness.

11- Above all I do it for the love of medicine.

The essential question is: why would you want to change?
Only try to do it if your heart is completely in it, and not for money or social position.
Do you have any idea what the life of a doctor is? You can try asking a doctor if you will be allowed to follow this document for some time to get an idea.

Of course, you know the costs involved: no income or less for the duration of medical school (4 years) and residency (3 to 6 years) and maybe a scholarship (1 to 2 years), student loans for those. 4 years of medical school for a total of between USD 150,000 and 450,000. As a resident, you would earn som

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The essential question is: why would you want to change?
Only try to do it if your heart is completely in it, and not for money or social position.
Do you have any idea what the life of a doctor is? You can try asking a doctor if you will be allowed to follow this document for some time to get an idea.

Of course, you know the costs involved: no income or less for the duration of medical school (4 years) and residency (3 to 6 years) and maybe a scholarship (1 to 2 years), student loans for those. 4 years of medical school for a total of between USD 150,000 and 450,000. As a resident you would make some money of $ 50,000 to $ 65,000 a year, how does that compare to your current salary?

See Medscape: Medscape Access Residents Salaries and Debt Report 2014

As a doctor, you need to be able to cope with a lot of pressure, stress, work in a busy clinic seeing patient after patient, often without enough time, or if you want to address that, go over the allotted time slot. patient who makes the next patients wait, which will make the grumpy to say the least; also difficult patients, losing patients despite having given their best, not feeling guilty about it, etc. etc. In addition to having to be on call or on call during the nights, weekends, during the holidays since it is a 24/7 service that we have to provide to people who live in the region our hospital or practice services.
It will influence your social life a lot, if you do not have a partner to support you, your relationship or your career will fail, or both.

In terms of income, being a primary care physician isn't that great either:
From Medscape: Medscape Access Medscape Physicians Compensation Report 2014


the work week is long

Here are the reasons doctors are proudest to be a doctor:


and many suffer from burnout, from Medscape: Medscape Access




but despite that, many report that they are happy

Think of all the reasons you wanted to be one.

  1. Is the title "Dr." what attracted you? Go do a PhD.
  2. Did you want to help people? You can help them by being a lawyer, a teacher, in many ways.
  3. Was it the dissection that seemed interesting? Zoology students honor living animals as well.
  4. Do you like the hospital environment? Become a teacher and work at a university hospital. Biochemistry Honors, Pharmacy Honors Professors, etc.

Rest everything in your head. Have you ever heard an architecture student rant that he wanted to be an engineer, why am I following this line? Almost never or a Bcom

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Think of all the reasons you wanted to be one.

  1. Is the title "Dr." what attracted you? Go do a PhD.
  2. Did you want to help people? You can help them by being a lawyer, a teacher, in many ways.
  3. Was it the dissection that seemed interesting? Zoology students honor living animals as well.
  4. Do you like the hospital environment? Become a teacher and work at a university hospital. Biochemistry Honors, Pharmacy Honors Professors, etc.

Rest everything in your head. Have you ever heard an architecture student rant that he wanted to be an engineer, why am I following this line? Almost never Or a Bcom student complaining about not being able to study law? No, I'm sure not.

This is because when we prepare for medical exams we are led to believe that doctors are the best, doctors are the hardest working, but a society cannot survive without other professions. You have another roll to play. Other works are equally great and important. Also, financial conditions need to be taken into account, as in your case, but that's okay.

Perhaps you have great management skills or are a powerful speaker, workers like you, who are willing to work day and night, are in fewer numbers in other lines, as most take the path to becoming a doctor. How about just looking and studying what life has to offer you?

So I would like to rephrase

"Think of all the reasons you wanted to become a doctor and introspection"

I am an aspiring Plastic Surgery and have just completed my Master of Surgery. I had a similar complex when I was in my junior / senior year of medical school. I have seen that in the age of superspecialization and subspecialties, if you know the subject of your broad specialty well, you will be considered a very knowledgeable physician. No one will see a surgeon for pediatric viral bronchiolitis or an orthopedist for pancreatic malignancy, but a cardiologist can be seen for chronic kidney failure, and a plastic surgeon can find DVT. So nothing is lost for you. Whatever the specialty

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I am an aspiring Plastic Surgery and have just completed my Master of Surgery. I had a similar complex when I was in my junior / senior year of medical school. I have seen that in the age of superspecialization and subspecialties, if you know the subject of your broad specialty well, you will be considered a very knowledgeable physician. No one will see a surgeon for pediatric viral bronchiolitis or an orthopedist for pancreatic malignancy, but a cardiologist can be seen for chronic kidney failure, and a plastic surgeon can find DVT. So nothing is lost for you. Whatever specialization you choose, excel at it. Spend those three years studying and working hard in the wards and OPD (and OT if you are a surgeon). You will come out as a very good doctor.

In India, there are 19 subjects that one has to study over the course of 4.5 years in Medical School. During my residency I realized that if you study 4 of those 19 well, you will be on par with your more studious colleagues in terms of clinical knowledge. Those 4 subjects are Pathology, Pharmacology, Medicine and Surgery. Get to know these 4 topics well and you will have enough knowledge to last through your residency and beyond. That said, excelling in your specialization is of the utmost importance and every effort should be made to achieve this during your residency days.

There will be difficulties in every race. The only difference is the type of difficulty it is.

An ER doctor may have a difficult time watching patients die. An author may have a hard time keeping his book from becoming a hit, which means that the rent is neither paid nor paid. Programmers can also have a similar scenario, an application crashes and leads to the downfall of businesses.

And don't think for a second that jobs are not the only areas of life in which one experiences difficulties, either because life is full of them: deaths, accidents, illnesses, failures, divorces and many more. Things happen in life

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There will be difficulties in every race. The only difference is the type of difficulty it is.

An ER doctor may have a difficult time watching patients die. An author may have a hard time keeping his book from becoming a hit, which means that the rent is neither paid nor paid. Programmers can also have a similar scenario, an application crashes and leads to the downfall of businesses.

And don't think for a second that jobs are not the only areas of life in which one experiences difficulties, either because life is full of them: deaths, accidents, illnesses, failures, divorces and many more. Things happen in life. Period.

Let each situation be what it is rather than what you think it should be, and then make the most of it. That is all you can do. If your dream is medicine, do it. But if your fear is the struggles that come with career, then you may need to explore which areas of medicine are the least stressful. Perhaps it could be a pathologist (little or no interaction with the patient), a medical liaison, a public speaker, an investigation, or just a professor. Just something to consider.

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