Human Resources is asking me to quit my current job before submitting the offer letter for my new job. That I have to do?

Updated on : January 21, 2022 by Sophie Douglas



Human Resources is asking me to quit my current job before submitting the offer letter for my new job. That I have to do?

There's a reason they're asking you and they're not telling you to resign from your current position (not that they have the right to tell you to resign or not resign from your current position, either; that would be more of a termination or a involuntary dismissal). resignation, which would give the company (more) problems, whether legal or financial, than they wish to have). It is very likely that they are asking (EXTREMELY LIKELY, in fact) for their own benefit (or more, the company's benefit) than yours. You still have the power to say yes or no. You should do what is best for yourself, NOT for them. Stay professional and

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There is a reason they are asking you and they are not telling you to resign from your current position (not that they have the right to tell you to resign or not resign from your current position, either; that would be more of a termination or dismissal involuntary). resignation, which would give the company (more) problems, whether legal or financial, than they wish to have). It is very likely that they are asking (EXTREMELY LIKELY, in fact) for their own benefit (or more, the company's benefit) than yours. You still have the power to say yes or no. You should do what is best for yourself, NOT for them. Be professional and respectful, but do what is in YOUR best interest, NOT theirs.

Based on the question, I personally would NOT resign prior to submitting the offer letter for the new job, as well as to get a start date for the new job. In fact, I would definitely start my new job before leaving my old job (if possible) or at least work my last day from the previous position as close to the start date of my new position as possible. If the start date is not the next day, it would be the next business day (following the weekend).

Some employers wonder why people don't stay. They generally do what is best financially for the organization, whether it indirectly annoys people or not. They do what is considered a "risk cost analysis." In other words, they analyze whether it is worth keeping a person in the organization or whether it is better to let them go. This is the same for endings. Which makes the most business sense. However, when there are quite valuable people leaving, that tends to make less business / financial sense in the future, especially if you hire people in the future who are not that invaluable or even invaluable at all. Those less valuable people tend to have bad attitudes, mindsets, and behaviors that could destroy the workplace. Don't be surprised if this type of situation has caused certain companies to go bankrupt recently and why some current companies may face the same fate sooner or later. I am not saying in any way that I am an excellent or horrible employee. What I am saying is that whether you are the employer or the employee, it always pays to be professional and respectful regardless of the situations you are facing. Because you never know what fate holds for you in the future, good or bad. It always pays to be professional and respectful regardless of the situations you are facing. Because you never know what fate holds for you in the future, good or bad. It always pays to be professional and respectful regardless of the situations you are facing. Because you never know what fate holds for you in the future, good or bad.

What legitimate reason is there for you to be asked to resign when you have not been officially offered a job? I can't think of one. What happens between you and your current employer is not their business. The first thing they have the right to dictate is when you report to work at their company.

It is highly suspicious that they want you to take that risk while keeping your options open without demonstrably committing to you.

I suggest you never do that. Without that offer letter and evidence of acceptance, you don't have a new job. And make sure it says what you want it to say. I have k

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What legitimate reason is there for you to be asked to resign when you have not been officially offered a job? I can't think of one. What happens between you and your current employer is not their business. The first thing they have the right to dictate is when you report to work at their company.

It is highly suspicious that they want you to take that risk while keeping your options open without demonstrably committing to you.

I suggest you never do that. Without that offer letter and evidence of acceptance, you don't have a new job. And make sure it says what you want it to say. I have known several people who were left without a job even after an offer letter, and another that their recruiter reported left in the most inappropriate way when they had not received a letter. And I had a job change after I left my employer in Arizona and came to North Carolina for the new job, but I still haven't applied.

The same pay and the same benefits, but it was a completely different job for a different executive and one he would never have accepted. In fact, I had already turned down the job they changed me to and even told them that there was no circumstance under which I would work for the man who would now be my boss.

I had only been interested in the job for which I was actually hired and for which I had just moved to the other side of the country. I thought the job offered would be exciting, challenging, exactly what I wanted to do, and I liked and admired the boss I would have and knew I could learn a lot from him.

But HR called me after my cross country trip with all my stuff on the road in a pickup truck and told me that they would switch me to the job I had turned down to work for the only 6 man I could have worked for. He said it would absolutely not work for anything.

They said they had a crisis and "he needs you more." It was probably true. He was a very senior executive at the headquarters of one of the largest banks in America, but I soon discovered that there was no one who did not detest him, and that he could not have run a one-man envelope filling station. The company promised that they would transfer me if I gave them 6 months to "fix it." They didn't straighten it out and they certainly couldn't, but they asked for 6 more months. I left.

I strongly suggest not giving up or even hinting at it until you have a letter, and it should be as specific about the work you will be doing and any other details you can get.

They want to be able to trust you, but trust is a two-way street.

You need to be able to convey your sincerity and enthusiasm for moving forward with them and joining their organization, without gambling your livelihood and putting yourself at risk.

At the end of the day, an offer is just that: an offer.

Once you receive the offer, there is always the possibility that you will find it less than satisfactory. Regardless of the offer, you can choose one of three options: 1) accept, 2) submit a counter offer, 3) withdraw.

As many others have mentioned here, the new organization asks you to take that leap.

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They want to be able to trust you, but trust is a two-way street.

You need to be able to convey your sincerity and enthusiasm for moving forward with them and joining their organization, without gambling your livelihood and putting yourself at risk.

At the end of the day, an offer is just that: an offer.

Once you receive the offer, there is always the possibility that you will find it less than satisfactory. Regardless of the offer, you can choose one of three options: 1) accept, 2) submit a counter offer, 3) withdraw.

As many others have mentioned here, that the new organization is asking you to take such a leap is truly absurd. BUT ... but, despite this, if this is a place where you REALLY see yourself working, and you don't get carried away by such an absurd request, there are ways to appease them and satisfy their request without risking so much.

Most employers require minimal notice before leaving, to keep up with the organization and to give them ample time to prepare for their departure (including time to find a replacement and possibly even mentor / train them). or time to inform colleagues about your projects so that your exit is as smooth as possible). For some employers, it is two weeks, for others it can be 3 months. In leadership roles, possibly even more.

Surely the HR team you've been working with in the new organization is familiar with these policies and even has their own.

What is the minimum amount of notice that you will be required to give to your current employer?

I would add that 2 weeks / 1 month / etc + The amount of time you think it will take for them to write and propose an offer + the time it will take to review and accept the offer (or counter) * = the date you will need.

Once you have this date in mind, you can allay your fears by confirming that “you have agreed to resign BUT it is company policy to give your current employer _______ a number of days in advance before leaving the company. "

If anything, they may even respect the fact that you are not willing to leave your current employer overnight; It shows that you won't hang them to dry and it shows what kind of employee you are, in a market where employees fear they can seek higher offers whenever they want.

Then, if you're happy with their offer, you'll still have an adequate amount of time to notify your current employer of your upcoming departure without ruining them / leaving on bad terms.

… And if your offer is terrible, you can walk away without ruining your relationship with your current employer. They the new company may be disappointed, but you owe them nothing and can sleep soundly at night knowing that you have avoided working for someone who wanted to exploit you.

Don't fall for a high pressure tactic that will eventually be used to force you to accept a lower offer, out of necessity / fear of unemployment. They are trying to take your power away. Despite his efforts to intimidate, you really do have the power here.

—-

* + the time it will take to review and accept your offer.

… This is the crucial step they are missing. (But we don't need to tell you that. You can stay with us, Quorans).

Once you receive any offer, they should give you a period of time (it can vary from 1 day to 2 weeks depending on what I have seen) to "think about it" and confirm. Even the best / kindest employers can seem nervous and tend to hate this part, because there is always the possibility that you will reject it, and if it is a good option, it usually doesn't take long to determine that you would like it. join your organization.

Good luck OP! I hope you feel empowered to do what is best for you and your career!

Sounds like a stupid rule. From being surrounded by a number of organizations of different types and sizes, stupid rules emerge ... Honestly, it doesn't sound like a ploy to get rid of you. First of all, in the US, the vast majority of employees are "at will" meaning you can leave whenever you want and they can let you go whenever they want. for some reason. As a result, there would be no reason to put an arcane rule just to get rid of you. Second, in today's tight job market, employers generally try to retain employees, not find complicated ways to get rid of them.

Presumptuous

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Sounds like a stupid rule. From being surrounded by a number of organizations of different types and sizes, stupid rules emerge ... Honestly, it doesn't sound like a ploy to get rid of you. First of all, in the US, the vast majority of employees are "at will" meaning you can leave whenever you want and they can let you go whenever they want. for some reason. As a result, there would be no reason to put an arcane rule just to get rid of you. Second, in today's tight job market, employers generally try to retain employees, not find complicated ways to get rid of them.

Assuming you want the promotion, I would provide them with a resignation letter that explicitly reads something like: “I offer this resignation letter along with the company's offer for a promotion to the position of xxx x and just because the company has stated that In this case, company policy requires such a resignation letter. This will protect you quite a bit in the very unlikely event that the company points you out and uses a fake promotion to get rid of you.

While it will likely cause some unwanted consternation, you could add something like, “By accepting this letter, the company acknowledges that if my promoted position is not available to me for any reason other than for the next six months, my previous position or a one equivalent will be available to me. "However, if you want the promotion, it may not be worth pissing them off with this phrase.

Again, it is very likely that the company is using this policy as a kind of “constructive dismissal”. If they wanted to get rid of you, they could and would.

You defend yourself.

On the one hand, I can understand the HR position. Some employees take offer letters to their current employer to see if the current employer can raise their salary, and then they go back to the new employer and ask for more. So it's understandable that HR doesn't want to do all that work to end up with nothing.

However, unless you have a sheet of paper, there is no offer to consider.

If you quit your current job before taking a role with your new offer, then you have nothing. You have neither your old position nor your new offer. If you give up your current

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You defend yourself.

On the one hand, I can understand the HR position. Some employees take offer letters to their current employer to see if the current employer can raise their salary, and then they go back to the new employer and ask for more. So it's understandable that HR doesn't want to do all that work to end up with nothing.

However, unless you have a sheet of paper, there is no offer to consider.

If you quit your current job before taking a role with your new offer, then you have nothing. You have neither your old position nor your new offer. If you resign from your current position and the numbers in your new offer letter are significantly smaller than you expected, what can you do about it? You have nothing in writing.

How did you feel when HR asked you to quit your current job before giving you a written letter? Do you really want to work for a company that makes you feel this way?

You can try to write a contract that says that you will resign your position if they make you an offer of at least the number you expect, and if they do not give you an offer of at least that amount by a certain date, they will owe you a large amount of money. in compensation for leaving your job without making you an offer of a high enough number. If they are willing to have a company official sign such a contract, then you may consider resigning after obtaining that signature. However, it is very unusual to do that, and it is practically impossible for them to sign, but they also ask you to put yourself in an impossible position. Asking you to resign from your current position without giving you something in writing is unreasonable.

You don't need to have the offer itself, but it's good to have something in writing before you leave your current position.

I first said that it is a strange request, but the more I thought about it, this is an absurd request, at least at first glance. It looks like they are two different employers, but unfortunately that was not clear from your question.

If it is the same employer, you can ask for clarification if they want you to resign from your previous position, but not from your employment with the company. That would make more sense, albeit strangely bureaucratic, than a second employer asking you to lose your job before they make you an offer.

It is dangerous for you to resign before you have a written offer that you have accepted and

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I first said that it is a strange request, but the more I thought about it, this is an absurd request, at least at first glance. It looks like they are two different employers, but unfortunately that was not clear from your question.

If it is the same employer, you can ask for clarification if they want you to resign from your previous position, but not from your employment with the company. That would make more sense, albeit strangely bureaucratic, than a second employer asking you to lose your job before they make you an offer.

It is dangerous for you to resign before you have a written offer that you have accepted and signed. As a courtesy, you can ask them to explain why and ask if all of their internal finalist candidates have been asked to do the same. The answer should be short, simple and direct. I can't imagine what it would be like. For more than 25 years and more than 10,000 employees as Vice President of Human Resources, I have never heard of a requirement like this.

You can say that the people you've asked have never heard of this requirement, and it transfers a significant life risk to your side of the table, with no guarantees and no agreement in place for your employment.

Try to get them to change position. But if they don't, you should seriously consider declining their offer. It feels like a bait and switch setup, but that's just guesswork. Whatever the reason, they are asking you to risk yourself that other employers won't ask.

I'm imagining a company full of quirky and unconventional "rules" like this one, and what it would be like to navigate that organization every day. Oh!

That they ask sounds a bit strange.

I am going with the interpretation that you are talking about different positions in the same company.

While I have not experienced such early warning, afterwards I have faced consequences on both sides of this.

In one job, the downsizing ended before I accepted the new position and it ended up being a good thing. HR has strong but unwritten transfer rules that would not have allowed for an offer of more than 10% over my previous position. Having been formally fired, there was no problem bringing me in as a new hire for the new job with a ba

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That they ask sounds a bit strange.

I am going with the interpretation that you are talking about different positions in the same company.

While I have not experienced such early warning, afterwards I have faced consequences on both sides of this.

In one job, the downsizing ended before I accepted the new position and it ended up being a good thing. HR has strong but unwritten transfer rules that would not have allowed for an offer of more than 10% over my previous position. Having been formally fired, I had no problem bringing myself in as a new employee for the new job with a base salary 75% higher than the previous one. The jobs weren't particularly related and were for completely different sectors of the company and it would have been a ridiculous underpayment for the new job (which required relocation, travel, and work in a combat zone), but that was the way it was. its the partucular bouracracia worked.

On the contrary, I should have somehow worked out a transfer when I changed branches in the military. By exiting first and then enlisting, I ended up losing a pay grade, while there might have been ways to maintain my grade otherwise.

I would try to find out what the motivation is behind the HR request, including the involvement of your new and existing supervisors.

The worst case I can think of is if this was a game to cheat you out of time / seniority for profit or vested rights.

Whatever the reason, you need to make sure you get some apps somewhere else and make sure they know that you are. If a company asks you to take a risk, they absolutely need to know that they are also running the risk of you accepting a better offer.

That kind of hard ball might be a different matter with a safe job, but it's totally justified here.

These days, HR is faced with the challenge of "No Show" on the date of onboarding. Unquestionably, the problem is due to some bad HR practices committed by HR professionals. When you are happy with your job but dissatisfied with the pay, you request a raise from current HR who rejects your application saying that you get paid on par with the industry. You decide to meet with the potential employer and receive an offer. Then your current HR starts negotiating with you, and sometimes you offer more than the offer at hand. Therein lies the real problem.

There is a set of candidates who handle the professional situation by not accepting or

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These days, HR is faced with the challenge of "No Show" on the date of onboarding. Unquestionably, the problem is due to some bad HR practices committed by HR professionals. When you are happy with your job but dissatisfied with the pay, you request a raise from current HR who rejects your application saying that you get paid on par with the industry. You decide to meet with the potential employer and receive an offer. Then your current HR starts negotiating with you, and sometimes you offer more than the offer at hand. Therein lies the real problem.

There is a set of candidates who handle the situation professionally by not accepting the potential employer's offer and arguing with the current employer keeping the potential employer well informed and telling them within a week if they cannot accept the offer. There is another group of candidates who accept the offer, negotiate with the current employer and decide to stay, but do not inform the prospective employer. They don't even communicate with the prospective employer leaving them high and dry. It is not acceptable at all.

As for your question, your prospective employer may be dealing with this problem a lot. It is a matter of trust. If you can convince them that you are willing to join and would not turn down the offer if it were made, you should at least give it a try.

But in case you expect your current employer to hire you after renewal, I have some advice for you. Go meet with your current manager / HR and make it clear to him that you plan to leave and leave the newspaper shortly. Also tell them about your concerns that led you to make this decision. Also ask the prospective employer to give you this in writing that once you quit, you will be made an agreed-upon offer.

That said, it is a matter of trust. Evaluate your position carefully, be firm in what you want, have open and transparent communication, and keep everyone informed about what you decide. Even if after receiving the offer, if you decide to continue with the current one, it is perfectly fine and professional to do so as long as you do not accept the offer and humbly decline it with valid reasons. There is nothing wrong with receiving an offer and rejecting it. But do it in the shortest time possible.

One thing that I think a candidate should not do is accept the offer and not join on the given "No show" date. This is unacceptable and unprofessional.

I was in the exact same situation a few months ago, this makes me eligible to answer this question.

Company X conducted my interview and found me suitable for the position, they accepted all my terms and conditions, assured me that I will get my expected CTC, but before providing me with the offer letter, they asked me to quit my current job. just to make sure I'm really interested in the offer and ready to join organization X. I felt like this was an absurd request. I responded by saying: “As a candidate I don't have many options, as if after quitting my current job, if I didn't leave

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I was in the exact same situation a few months ago, this makes me eligible to answer this question.

Company X conducted my interview and found me suitable for the position, they accepted all my terms and conditions, assured me that I will get my expected CTC, but before providing me with the offer letter, they asked me to quit my current job. just to make sure I'm really interested in the offer and ready to join organization X. I felt like this was an absurd request. I responded, saying: "As a candidate I don't have many options, as if after resigning from my current job, if I do not receive an offer letter according to my terms and conditions, I would have no other option." Other than joining your organization, because after I put paper, my current organization will not entertain me. But as an organization you have a lot more options compared to me, as you should have conducted interviews with other candidates, and you must have planned to offer a position to someone else if I do not accept your offer, in short, you have the option of 2 to 3 candidates, but I have no other option ”. I insist that they provide me with an offer letter, only after I resigned from my organization (in this case, I assured them that they would resign from my current job on the same day, that they deliver an offer letter to me, this built their confidence in my) .

I recommend that you do not put paper in your current organization before receiving an offer letter from your future organization, because this will save you from being "Dhobi ka kutta na ghar ka na ghaat ka".

All the best and congratulations on your new job.

Human Resources is asking me to quit my current job before submitting the offer letter for my new job. That I have to do?

If I were in your position, these are the things I would consent to.

I gather from your question that you are not changing employers. I also understand that the only real change is that you are offered to move to another division or job in the same organization. Given the above assumptions, I suspect that you might have amassed valuable retirement funds or similar benefits. If you quit, you will lose these benefits and start from scratch with zero benefits in your n

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Human Resources is asking me to quit my current job before submitting the offer letter for my new job. That I have to do?

If I were in your position, these are the things I would consent to.

I gather from your question that you are not changing employers. I also understand that the only real change is that you are offered to move to another division or job in the same organization. Given the above assumptions, I suspect that you might have amassed valuable retirement funds or similar benefits. If you resign, you will lose these benefits and start from scratch with zero benefits in your new position. It's a valuable dirty trick that some employers use to make you lose your benefits. The decision is yours if you want the new position.

However, if I am wrong in my previous assumption and you are changing companies, I advise you not to quit your current job until you have a signed and endorsed offer in hand. The company that is luring you in with a position can afford to change your mind and not give you the contract. You, on the other hand, cannot afford to lose your livelihood on a promise.

In fact, I would inform HR at the prospective company of that. At least they'll know that you're smart enough not to just bet on one offer.

Hello there,

I recently interviewed a candidate and he was selected for the position. The offer letter was delivered to him with the Justice Department.

Later, before the date of incorporation, the candidate was a bit reluctant to join and asked to postpone the date of incorporation, as his current employer would not stop working until his staff joined.

We asked your resignation email to confirm that you had indeed resigned. He shared the same and based on the same we approve his delay in joining.

Later, he was reluctant to join again and began to renegotiate with HR saying that his company was offering the same amount of what our organization was offering.

Anyway we offer

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Hello there,

I recently interviewed a candidate and he was selected for the position. The offer letter was delivered to him with the Justice Department.

Later, before the date of incorporation, the candidate was a bit reluctant to join and asked to postpone the date of incorporation, as his current employer would not stop working until his staff joined.

We asked your resignation email to confirm that you had indeed resigned. He shared the same and based on the same we approve his delay in joining.

Later, he was reluctant to join again and began to renegotiate with HR saying that his company was offering the same amount of what our organization was offering.

We offered him more anyway, but now his current organization has further delayed his release as he has played with them. He had no choice but to stay with them to get fnf.

In the meantime, I asked HR to stop his onboarding as he was not committed to the finalized onboarding date and had already changed it twice.

Now this guy has LWD in the current organization and the offer received has been withdrawn due to misconduct.

Well, the candidate keeps playing with the companies by getting multiple job offers and negotiating with the existing company, so they ask for a letter of resignation as proof. But the same cannot act as a hindrance if you have another chance when you are in the notice period.

Go ahead and share the resignation letter, but be careful not to renegotiate with the same organization; otherwise you may have problems.

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