How would you handle a situation where you were rejected at a company where you applied for a job and they turn around and give you an offer two weeks after receiving the rejection email?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by James Dillon



How would you handle a situation where you were rejected at a company where you applied for a job and they turn around and give you an offer two weeks after receiving the rejection email?

Well, it was a phone call that told me that I hadn't gotten the job. And then a few days later someone else apologized and offered me the job. I worked there for four years and never knew exactly what had happened.

As Biron Clark and Frank Ansell point out, there is little, but always a possibility.

The top three reasons I see for approved candidates eventually getting an offer are:

  1. The first candidate does not accept the offer. It is really bad for the organization to turn down a candidate before there is a definitive candidate in the position, but I see that it happens often, and it is always due to the organizing process.
  2. The first candidate does not pass the background and verification process. Again, this is a process that is part of an organization. Due to the time and expense of the background check process,
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As Biron Clark and Frank Ansell point out, there is little, but always a possibility.

The top three reasons I see for approved candidates eventually getting an offer are:

  1. The first candidate does not accept the offer. It is really bad for the organization to turn down a candidate before there is a definitive candidate in the position, but I see that it happens often, and it is always due to the organizing process.
  2. The first candidate does not pass the background and verification process. Again, this is a process that is part of an organization. Due to the time and expense of the background check process, many organizations will bid, and on board a candidate, contingent upon the background check and check. This usually happens during the onboarding of candidates. If something goes wrong with the background or verification, the candidate may not qualify for the position (this is all based on the organization's policies, role, function, and candidate responses for preflight and research background). If this happens, companies (per policy) can immediately contact other candidates.
  3. The first candidate does not last in function. This could be voluntary or involuntary leave from the position. Regardless, and in accordance with laws and company policy, the next in line may be offered an offer for the position.

There are so many variables, including labor law and organizational policy, that come into play. The short answer, yes, there is a possibility, but it is highly unlikely in most situations.

My advice is to network and stay in touch with the hiring manager or recruiter if you really want to work for the company. If you can get feedback on the reason for the rejection (again, that could be difficult due to laws and policies), work to grow in that direction, and in your next request show that you took action based on your specific feedback.

Good luck and do not hesitate to let me know if you need any clarification.

Above all, never lose confidence in yourself.

Kris

I would recommend looking elsewhere. One of those emails was true, the other was not. Unless they were for two different roles.

Which COULD be explained, but the lack of response says the rejection was true and the offer was bogus. Especially if it's been more than a week since you've heard from them.

I've never heard of it, which is strange. All companies, even the smallest ones, are not going to proactively write an offer letter, which is usually done by HR / Legal, CFO, etc. - someone with the authority to do so.

Still, it is not a good sign that they do not really know what is going on. That

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I would recommend looking elsewhere. One of those emails was true, the other was not. Unless they were for two different roles.

Which COULD be explained, but the lack of response says the rejection was true and the offer was bogus. Especially if it's been more than a week since you've heard from them.

I've never heard of it, which is strange. All companies, even the smallest ones, are not going to proactively write an offer letter, which is usually done by HR / Legal, CFO, etc. - someone with the authority to do so.

Still, it is not a good sign that they do not really know what is going on. It could also be that you were his second choice.

It is exactly the same….

I'll tell you a little secret…. Do you know how frustrated you are that you haven't received any feedback after your in-person interview? The one that went really well?

That could be because you were a VERY CLOSE SECOND CHOICE.

The employer may hold on to your application, and not reject it, because you are an excellent second choice.

If the first candidate rejects your offer, they will probably be in line for the next offer. And don't be offended by being the second; the distinctions between first and second finishers are so subjective that they are otherwise bad.

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It is exactly the same….

I'll tell you a little secret…. Do you know how frustrated you are that you haven't received any feedback after your in-person interview? The one that went really well?

That could be because you were a VERY CLOSE SECOND CHOICE.

The employer may hold on to your application, and not reject it, because you are an excellent second choice.

If the first candidate rejects your offer, they will probably be in line for the next offer. And don't be offended by being second: the distinction between first and second place finishers is so subjective that it otherwise makes no sense in many cases.

Now a lot of companies are terrible with their feedback and communication, so just because you haven't heard from them doesn't mean I'm the silver medalist. But that's what happens sometimes.

You will probably never find out that it was the second choice, because the bidding process will be the same as for the first place candidate!

You can, especially if you've done something in the meantime, graduate, add a certification, get closer, or something similar. And you can if you feel you were unfairly rejected due to a resume / application glitches / spelling / omissions / errors that you correct before applying again. However, you may never receive a reply, it depends on how they browse the apps and for how long. Some companies have a moratorium on new applications (maybe a year, maybe 6 months or whatever they decide). You may get lucky and apply a second time through a recruiter who has a great relationship with the company and is impr

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You can, especially if you've done something in the meantime, graduate, add a certification, get closer, or something similar. And you can if you feel you were unfairly rejected due to a resume / application glitches / spelling / omissions / errors that you correct before applying again. However, you may never receive a reply, it depends on how they browse the apps and for how long. Some companies have a moratorium on new applications (maybe a year, maybe 6 months or whatever they decide). You may be lucky and apply a second time through a recruiter who has a great relationship with the company and is impressed by their qualifications.

All of that to say it's worth a try, but don't count on anything and be prepared to stop applying there after this second injection for at least another 6 months. Good luck!

It is not clear to you whether it is you who is rejecting the offer or whether you mean that the company rejects you after the interview (that is, it refuses to make you an offer).

I once had a case where the company initially rejected me and then changed their mind. After completing the interview process, the recruiter called to say that the company had decided that I was not the right person. Then a day or two later, he called again to tell me that they were thinking better of it and that he would be interested in going to one more interview. The interview was with the chief architect of the company, we got along well and I got one o

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It is not clear to you whether it is you who is rejecting the offer or whether you mean that the company rejects you after the interview (that is, it refuses to make you an offer).

I once had a case where the company initially rejected me and then changed their mind. After completing the interview process, the recruiter called to say that the company had decided that I was not the right person. Then a day or two later, he called again to tell me that they were thinking better of it and that he would be interested in going to one more interview. The interview was with the chief architect of the company, we got along well and I received an offer that week. He was very interested in the job, so I accepted despite his initial concern.

Later I heard that everyone I interviewed liked me, except for one person who had doubts. My initial rejection was due to that lack of consensus. Later, interviewers who liked him rejected the hiring manager and challenged the rejection. The interview with the chief architect was the "tiebreaker."

The lesson I learned was to always take rejection gracefully and always leave the door open. You never know what can happen.

Yes, it is very common.

It also happens the other way around; I wonder if it depends on the job market in my city or if it is common (that is why I will follow this question out of curiosity).

First of all, I graduated in software engineering with honors and took a .net course (back in 2005), I applied for 50-100 jobs in my metropolitan area; did not get a single job for 3 months. so I started working as a data entry clerk after pawning all my electronic devices except my PC.

Two months later, one of the companies I applied for called, I turned them down because I had a 9-month contract and I didn't break.

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Yes, it is very common.

It also happens the other way around; I wonder if it depends on the job market in my city or if it is common (that is why I will follow this question out of curiosity).

First of all, I graduated in software engineering with honors and took a .net course (back in 2005), I applied for 50-100 jobs in my metropolitan area; did not get a single job for 3 months. so I started working as a data entry clerk after pawning all my electronic devices except my PC.

Two months later, one of the companies I applied for called, I turned them down because they had a 9-month contract and they weren't breaking it, not even for a 20% higher salary.

Almost two years later, I got a job in an IT company as a full web programmer, the company went bankrupt in the crisis of 2009; so I was back in the job market, this time I had savings, so I applied to 50 similar jobs in the metropolitan area. So a second round of getting turned down by all the local companies until I got a tech support job at the company of over 70 hours per week.

In that company I managed to connect with my co-workers and get a job 3 months later in a company that had previously rejected me; "Currently we only hire women" was the reason I was hired in 2005. Well, I prefer to be practical as long as it does not go against my ethics (see below), so I took the job; It was a lower salary than technical support, but being a programmer again, 60 hours a week and a good scale of increase more than compensated for the change, in fact, in a year they already paid me better.

But one person was fired from this company, so he took all the knowledge he could, got an associate and started hiring people from my current company, since he knew the salaries and happiness of his former co-workers, he started doing some pretty smart negotiations. ; People who were about to quit and were about to quit were offered $ 100 less than they were earning; people who considered quitting smoking were offered the same salary; to people who were happy (like me), they offered up to a 50% increase in salary if we worked for him. So this is the one that I considered unethical and rejected this company.

This company went bankrupt again because cannibalization was a pretty hard blow that ended an ongoing project. The few of us who survived started a new company together with one of the associates from the bankrupt company, I worked there for 2 years but ended up quitting even though I got a nice raise as we were doing more than 70 hours a day. week as a rule and that totally broke my work life balance, I had also worked 6 months of 70 hours a week through colitis and typhoid flu, so my health was also at risk.

So I got a job for a Brazilian company that offered 40 hours a week, that job ended up being a big scam since they started slowly but they didn't pay me after the first six months; Since my father was ill for those 3 years, I was very limited to job changes because I was breastfeeding him; so I was limited to working alone at home and still had faith in the Brazilian company, since a friend of more than 15 years was the owner of the company. I received several job offers from many local companies that had previously rejected me in my career, but I was unable to accept the jobs because the companies required me to go to the office and the salary was not enough to pay for a nurse.

Eventually my father died, the Brazilian company stopped responding to my emails asking about the payment, so I wrote down the work I did for them, including the source code; and I started applying for local jobs because now I could afford to go to an office. Unsurprisingly, all the companies that I turned down during the 3 years of caring for my father had fun turning me down now; one said it was because they currently had no vacancies.

Eventually I started getting calls for interviews; one was for one of the companies that rejected my 2 previous unemployment terms, but this time they said they were very positive in hiring me and considering it done, but I had to follow the motions, while the company I currently work for had an attitude more restrained on hiring me, however, this one was still old enough to do the hiring process in a week, while the largest seemed to take months; The funny thing is that both companies offered the same amount of money 12k pesos (600 usd) per month, however, the current one lowered it to 10kpesos-500 usd the day I signed the contract.

Two months later I received a call from the other company asking me about my employment situation, to which I replied that I was already working although I was still relatively interested in their offer, when they asked me why I was not waiting for them, I replied that they said that their process It would take a maximum of 3 weeks and it was already two months, they gave me an explanation about having “lost my papers”, then we verified my salary, they were surprised that they paid me 10k, but I told them that both companies had offered me 12k when I negotiated for the first time once, then they told me that they could easily pay me 15k maybe 17k (how much I earned before working for Brazil) due to my level of experience; So I practically agreed to accept his job, I just needed the payment confirmation to be at least 15k; Then they asked me to do an extra interview with them because otherwise they could only offer me 12k or I didn't have time to take the interview (remember I was working 50 hours a week now) to take the 12k. I had to decline his offer for the 12k because, for me, it did not justify a job change, especially since I had to take an extra trip of at least an hour every day, if not two.

So in the latter case, I think I ended up turning down a company that turned me down before as they never called again for the interview. I have also received several offers from local companies (and some of them have turned me down before, especially during my periods of unemployment), but the best salary they have gotten is 12k, which means that there is hardly any improvement considering that I will have to add additional travel time.

Oh yeah, what I said about maybe being local to my city is that my metro area has 20 colleges that offer degrees in computer science, which means there are a lot of programming companies there relative to the size of the campus. area (we only have 2 million inhabitants), there is also a change, and only 5 hours from there there is a large industrial city (Monterrey, some Americans may know) that pays wages 2 to 4 times higher, although the cost of living also increases a bit. .

Long and short answer: Your resume fits the bill for what they're looking for in terms of skills, and your first interview didn't raise any major flags, and it was probably a soft pass for a number of small reasons (you weren't about to). start early enough, the vice president didn't like you, you were 'average' in an important interview instead of 'exceptional', etc.)

They may not have been able to close another candidate in the position. It is possible that they had the count for another position alongside the previous one. Really do not care. In this case, the recruiter is your friend. Tell them you're still interested

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Long and short answer: Your resume fits the bill for what they're looking for in terms of skills, and your first interview didn't raise any major flags, and it was probably a soft pass for a number of small reasons (you weren't about to). start early enough, the vice president didn't like you, you were 'average' in an important interview instead of 'exceptional', etc.)

They may not have been able to close another candidate in the position. It is possible that they had the count for another position alongside the previous one. Really do not care. In this case, the recruiter is your friend. Let them know that you are still interested in the position and see if you can provide any comments on your last interview. Some recruiters give up on this, while others will get in the way. Don't push it. If you receive any comments, please correct them. If you don't, go there and try kicking butt again; If you are asked to re-interview, it means that you were REALLY close the first time.

Good luck!

Before my previous answer here, I was rejected by a water bottling company. It was my first interview, so the aftermath of this interview made a big impact on me to this day.

Forwarded to 10 months later, my classmate who worked there texted me one day out of nowhere.

Our conversation went like this:

Her: Hey, are you already working?

Me: No, not yet. Why?

Her: You applied for the company I currently work for, right? The one our friend Harley used to work with.

Me: Oh yeah, so what?

Her: Are you still interested in working there? I demand a new partner.

Me: Me? No way, what for? The last time I was rejected

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Before my previous answer here, I was rejected by a water bottling company. It was my first interview, so the aftermath of this interview made a big impact on me to this day.

Forwarded to 10 months later, my classmate who worked there texted me one day out of nowhere.

Our conversation went like this:

Her: Hey, are you already working?

Me: No, not yet. Why?

Her: You applied for the company I currently work for, right? The one our friend Harley used to work with.

Me: Oh yeah, so what?

Her: Are you still interested in working there? I demand a new partner.

Me: Me? No way, what for? I was turned down last time and I didn't get any notification from you two! No email or text message from either of us. Go find other people next to me. They've already turned me down, so it's their loss. Go advertise this position elsewhere, maybe our young people interested in this.

Her: I prefer not to advertise. I have my own goals to be my partner.

Me: Oh, you mean like me he's a very fit caliber worker?

-end-

I don't understand how you think you have the power and authority to choose the people you wanted to work with. I mean that company is not owned by her grandfather or estate, but still, the way she invited me was like smearing my wounds with salt.

Even if she recommended me, I bet her boss doesn't want me in her company, as she said that "teachers are still needed in this country anyway and our country still lacks teachers."

* Note: Many people in my country still see that schools still lack teachers. The salary in a private company is half the salary in a government sector, so it is more attractive to work in the government sector than in the private sector. Many bosses tend to think that we will flee if we receive an offer from a government sector. But looking at the financial situation in my country, the chances of getting a job are 1 in 2000.

Yes. I interviewed for a database administrator job in Ft Hood, TX a couple of years ago. The interviewer was quite honest with me that they were desperate for someone. They were considering hiring someone who didn't have any databases or computers and training them to do the job. I have years of programming experience and multiple instances of database stuff. I am not a guru, but I am certainly several notches above the worst case scenario I was describing. We chatted and seemed to get along. I needed a job as my current contract at Ft Hood had just ended leaving me stranded. After the call I told my wife that

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Yes. I interviewed for a database administrator job in Ft Hood, TX a couple of years ago. The interviewer was quite honest with me that they were desperate for someone. They were considering hiring someone who didn't have any databases or computers and training them to do the job. I have years of programming experience and multiple instances of database stuff. I am not a guru, but I am certainly several notches above the worst case scenario I was describing. We chatted and seemed to get along. I needed a job as my current contract at Ft Hood had just ended leaving me stranded. After the call, I told my wife that it looked like I was going to work very soon. He wasn't overly confident. No one had offered me a job yet.

Any.

The days passed without an answer. I kept applying for jobs and going to interviews. I got a call from a contractor in Maryland. He did the interview; received the offer for twice what Hood offered; He took it and left Texas.

Eighteen months later I got a call on my cell from Hood. Same guy. The same job. He offered me the job. I said, “I thought we were getting along. I was sure you would offer me that job 18 months ago. What happened?"

The rest of the story. They had already offered the job to another candidate who had already accepted. Company policy required that they interview a fixed number of candidates. I was the next guy on the list. I was more qualified than the other candidate but the job had already been offered to me. He was calling me because the other guy had recently quit work. I thanked. I told him that I understood the policies of the company. Now I was a hiring manager and I knew you had to do things like that. No hurt feelings, but no, I wouldn't move back to Texas for half the pay.

I haven't, but I've been the recruiter in that situation. The hiring manager had two candidates that they really liked, practically a tie, but they had to choose one. Offer extended to the first person, but it didn't work out for various reasons. When the HM was rejected, they extended the offer to the second-choice candidate. There was a bit of hesitation about accepting when they hadn't been considered THE ONLY ONE, but all but one ended up accepting and were glad they did.

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