How would you apply marketing to your work?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Frederick Moss



How would you apply marketing to your work?

Here are some marketing concepts that you can apply to your career path:

  1. Develop your online presence. Put yourself on the map if you want to find your ideal job or start your own business. ...
  2. Be proactive. ...
  3. Follow up. ...
  4. Extend your gratitude. ...
  5. Build your network.

This is a tough question! However, I hope this gives you some clarity.

Having worked in both sales and marketing, my personal favorite has been marketing. Both have their unique pros and cons.

Sales has the ability to be a bit more stressful due to production targets and the need to achieve sales figures or targets.

Marketing is usually a little more relaxed, less about performance and more about meeting deadlines with design and projects.

A career in sales tends to generate much more turnover, but it can be more financially rewarding. Unless you're really good at sales or can find a job.

Keep reading

This is a tough question! However, I hope this gives you some clarity.

Having worked in both sales and marketing, my personal favorite has been marketing. Both have their unique pros and cons.

Sales has the ability to be a bit more stressful due to production targets and the need to achieve sales figures or targets.

Marketing is usually a little more relaxed, less about performance and more about meeting deadlines with design and projects.

A career in sales tends to generate much more turnover, but it can be more financially rewarding. Unless you're really good at sales or can find a job that pays a base salary with bonuses instead of full commission, sales can be a tricky place. A job where pay is based entirely or primarily on commissions can be stressful and you will always want to have good savings to get you through the low months. At the same time, depending on the industry, sales can be much more rewarding than marketing.

A career in marketing tends to be a bit more stable (depending on the environment) with less turnover. Marketing jobs are also much harder to find than sales jobs. Everybody needs sales. Marketing is primarily based on salary with some bonus systems. Although marketing doesn't have as many pressure-driven numbers, because it's more about generating leads than making sales, there can still be some levels of hit numbers through conversion rates based on your industry and product.

If you're more outgoing, structured, people-focused, goal-driven, and enjoy a good argument, sales are for you.

If you are more introverted, creative, design-focused, driven by colors and feelings, and like to observe artistic expressions, marketing is for you.

Sales will require you to spend a lot of time learning your product, studying the industry and your customers. But overall, sales and the sales cycle stay pretty much the same. So once you know the sales and can be good at closing deals, it's pretty transferable.

Marketing, on the other hand, will require you to constantly continue to learn to keep up with innovative new forms of marketing driven by technological advancements. You can never get comfortable with marketing due to online developments and new marketing streams through social media and ads.

Bottom line: Go with your heart, your instincts, and what you'll be passionate about. in the long run. Both marketing and sales can satisfy you in different ways, but in the end, I found more happiness in marketing because of my personality and skill set.

Marketing is one of the most popular career destinations for recent graduates. And it is easy to see why. Marketers are the people who make us do it. Just go for it, entice us to get the London look, and turn it to 30 °.

Marketing is concerned with identifying consumer demand for a product or service and developing ways in which consumers can purchase them in optimal quantities to make your business profitable. This involves looking at market research, distribution, product design, location (i.e. where to sell it), pricing, and promotion, also known as the 4 'P's.

Taking advantage of your mom

Keep reading

Marketing is one of the most popular career destinations for recent graduates. And it is easy to see why. Marketers are the people who make us do it. Just go for it, entice us to get the London look, and turn it to 30 °.

Marketing is concerned with identifying consumer demand for a product or service and developing ways in which consumers can purchase them in optimal quantities to make your business profitable. This involves looking at market research, distribution, product design, location (i.e. where to sell it), pricing, and promotion, also known as the 4 'P's.

By leveraging the buying habits of your market, your job is to develop new products, design packaging to set your product apart from the competition, public relations, develop advertising strategies for television or newspapers and various other media, and after-sales service. .

Of course, one of the main reasons so many people get involved in the marketing industry each year is the prestige that is often associated with working for some of the biggest and most recognized brands, such as Coca-Cola, Virgin or L 'Or real. But not everything is glitz and glamor.

There is marketing trying to persuade people to buy car insurance, eat more vegetables, or use less energy. Then there is business-to-business marketing promoting industrial and office equipment, direct marketing by phone or mail, websites, and television.

One of the wonders of working in marketing is the myriad opportunities to specialize in certain areas, such as market research and direct marketing, or to branch out into other related disciplines, such as public relations and advertising.

New entrants to the industry will generally start their career as a marketing executive, but, in a world where branding and rebranding are common, this job is sometimes referred to as a product manager or assistant brand manager. Another popular entry-level position is Market Researcher.

Higher up the career ladder, marketing managers and directors hold the highest positions within an industry that currently employs around 1 million workers.
The industry is fast-paced and can never be called pedestrian, it's glamorous sometimes, but it's always hard work - this isn't a 9-5 job and the hours can be long.

Employment is predominantly permanent. And as media choice becomes increasingly diverse, combined with our somewhat insatiable appetite for consumerism, the demand for skilled and creative marketers will continue, as will the rewards. Why? Because you worth it.

This is a killer question. I myself am an Econ graduate and went through the exact same unhealthy process of realization when I saw all of my peers head straight for finance and banking.

*shudder*

The key to making money in marketing is taking the road less traveled. When most people talk about marketing, they think of the "traditional" linear route:

  • Join a company as a marketing executive. Don't make money, work very hard.
  • Elbow your way a couple of rungs up the ladder. Charge a little more, but work just as hard. Stop doing * real * marketing - start a career as a profession
Keep reading

This is a killer question. I myself am an Econ graduate and went through the exact same unhealthy process of realization when I saw all of my peers head straight for finance and banking.

*shudder*

The key to making money in marketing is taking the road less traveled. When most people talk about marketing, they think of the "traditional" linear route:

  • Join a company as a marketing executive. Don't make money, work very hard.
  • Elbow your way a couple of rungs up the ladder. Charge a little more, but work just as hard. Stop doing * real * marketing - Start a career as a professional meeting assistant.
  • Stop and hope for the best. Apply for every manager / director / vice president position that appears. Failure, due to office policy or outside hires. Turn around to drink. Immerse yourself in a deep sense of misery and failure.

In this scenario, making a decent living is difficult. Competition abounds and it's hard to stand out.

So don't do that.

Instead, look for a small company with big ambitions for growth. Get in early. Use your quantitative marketing skills (which, by the way, are in high demand right now) to build a strong personal brand, and instead of talking about your marketing skills, show them off to people.

Here's the catch: Take a lower salary than the industry standard, but try to ensure as much equity as possible.

In small startups, it's easier to climb the ladder just kicking butt at your job. Over time, you may earn a better-than-average salary, but to get a really big reward, you can't exceed the stock you own in a company that you believe in.

If you can get into a business that is twice your size early, is bought by a big name, or at best goes public, there is a great chance that you will earn more than each of your financial friends.

Oh, and you will do it in an industry that you enjoy.

Not bad for a marketing nerd, huh?

  1. Get experience in a small agency. Find someone you want to work for. Ideally, a thought leader in your field of interest. At best, they run a smaller agency (<20 employees). Do what you can to get your foot in the door. Forget about making good money. Your salary should not be your point of reference in deciding where to work.
  2. Prove your worth by absorbing everything you are exposed to. Spend evenings and weekends reading blogs to fill in your knowledge gaps and bring that knowledge to work. In 6-9 months, if you have proven your worth and your leadership is smart, you will be p
Keep reading
  1. Get experience in a small agency. Find someone you want to work for. Ideally, a thought leader in your field of interest. At best, they run a smaller agency (<20 employees). Do what you can to get your foot in the door. Forget about making good money. Your salary should not be your point of reference in deciding where to work.
  2. Prove your worth by absorbing everything you are exposed to. Spend evenings and weekends reading blogs to fill in your knowledge gaps and bring that knowledge to work. Within 6-9 months, if you have proven yourself and your leadership is smart, you will be promoted.
  3. Specialize in a discipline. Once you have a feel for the terrain, find out what you really want to do and start becoming an expert in that field. While it's good to have general knowledge about a variety of marketing activities, only small businesses hire marketing generalists. What big money-paying companies want are experts in their fields.
  4. Get great agency experience. While the small agency you start with may turn into a large agency, you can also choose to leave and go to a larger agency. This means that you will work in a more compartmentalized way and that specialty that you have been refining will come in handy. In a larger agency, you will have to climb a higher ladder, with new challenges to face. Try to reach a high-level position. This is also a good time to get a master's degree.
  5. Go home and enjoy the sweet life. Join a company where you believe in your mission as a CMO and spend long weekends with your family in the Hamptons.
  6. Become a startup advisor. Join startups looking for mentors. Enter the ground floor and have fun.
  7. Profit!


I hope that helps!

I think you need to be very good at "understanding" sales to be good at marketing.

I also believe that a lot of people can be very good at sales and that you can learn to do it in a very efficient way. Some people are born with it and others learn from the experience. But that does not mean that you will be good at marketing.

The thing about marketing is that it is by no means a simple "sale", it is much more than that. You have to understand how the human mind works, what interests different people in different places and in different age groups, you have to think like a customer, but

Keep reading

I think you need to be very good at "understanding" sales to be good at marketing.

I also believe that a lot of people can be very good at sales and that you can learn to do it in a very efficient way. Some people are born with it and others learn from the experience. But that does not mean that you will be good at marketing.

The thing about marketing is that it is by no means a simple "sale", it is much more than that. You have to understand how the human mind works, what interests different people in different places and in different age groups, you have to think like a customer, but in a very smart way, you have to think in terms of Marketing Psychology!

You have to always be in the 'game' - know all the latest tricks and popular platforms and understand how to best use them for your marketing campaigns - Instagram is a great example as it is one of the best platforms to use in different campaigns of marketing. Bells. Therefore, you have to become a professional and master all these different platforms and take advantage of the opportunities.

Marketing is a difficult business, especially since it is competitive and constant. Some things in marketing never change, and some methods are so fundamental that the foundation almost never changes (let's call it sales psychology), but some things change constantly, and you should always keep up.

Hope this was helpful, let me know if you have any other questions, I'll be talking about it all day!

I also consider myself an introvert and now I have spent almost 6 years in marketing. Let me set the context first.

- I don't like talking to people at the lunch table
- I'm not the one making jokes while spending time with friends
- I don't like small talk with a colleague, friend or even a family member at all.
- I grew up with very few friends in school and college. Unsurprisingly, I am in contact with fewer than 5-6 people from my school / college days
; I am not a fan of attending public meetings professionally or for family occasions.

Yet somehow I have found a way to live around this. Here ar

Keep reading

I also consider myself an introvert and now I have spent almost 6 years in marketing. Let me set the context first.

- I don't like talking to people at the lunch table
- I'm not the one making jokes while spending time with friends
- I don't like small talk with a colleague, friend or even a family member at all.
- I grew up with very few friends in school and college. Unsurprisingly, I am in contact with fewer than 5-6 people from my school / college days
; I am not a fan of attending public meetings professionally or for family occasions.

Yet somehow I have found a way to live around this. Here are some things that I follow.

- I work harder on my projects, good work makes them respect you more. This means that you won't move from day one into a new office, with a new client, or with a new boss, but eventually your work will speak for you
- Good work leaves a better lasting impression than good conversations
- I make sure that I don't have my best friends at work. I try to keep my best friends outside of work. Friends who know me well and don't find it strange when I add very few lines to a conversation while having dinner
- There are still some cases where you have to speak at work! I focused on starting a conversation with colleagues or clients about relevant work being done by others in the industry and limited myself to having only conversations related to the work domain.
- I also made sure to read a lot about my work domain so that I could better contribute to these conversations
- I also started taking coffee breaks with a larger group of colleagues (4-5) instead of going with one person in order to survive not speaking at all for those 15-20 minutes and it worked perfectly fine!

So I'm not the most popular guy in the office, but I'm happy to wear the tag of someone who knows his shit well enough :)

Marketing is something that is required in all job categories, in all businesses. Most people get it wrong when it comes to understanding marketing. They get misunderstanding from companies that say sales is marketing. But it's not true, having to study marketing myself. I believe that marketing is much more than generating leads or sales.

  • Recognizing or making a promotion technique dependent on learning objectives advertises qualities and cost and margin factors.
  • Partner with clients after agreements or signing contracts to determine issues and provide ongoing support.
  • Arra
Keep reading

Marketing is something that is required in all job categories, in all businesses. Most people get it wrong when it comes to understanding marketing. They get misunderstanding from companies that say sales is marketing. But it's not true, having to study marketing myself. I believe that marketing is much more than generating leads or sales.

  • Recognizing or making a promotion technique dependent on learning objectives advertises qualities and cost and margin factors.
  • Partner with clients after agreements or signing contracts to determine issues and provide ongoing support.
  • Organizing or guiding improvement or correspondence is intended to help create and maintain a positive open image for an individual or association.
  • Coordinate and awaken the execution of an advance group to meet the objectives of the battle.
  • Pledge campaigns take advantage of the advertising specialist's presentation and relational skills to make presentations at meetings of potential contributors. They classify and cover occasions and ensure sponsorships of corporate substances.
  • Internet-based life supervisors leverage the cooperative skills of career advancement to work cooperatively with staff from other work units in their organizations.

If you are still in college, consider doing internships at marketing and / or promotional companies. Read. Study. Take college or online courses in marketing. Learn the financial aspect. Break down doors. Respond to ads. NETWORK. Enter at ground level. Get started with a company, get nice to the marketing guys, and apply when there's a vacancy.

Unfortunately, the answer is the same as getting any specialization. You need talent, drive, meeting the right people, tenacity, and a bit of luck and / or timing. Once you have Marketing on your resume, in any capacity, it will be infinitely more profitable for lateral / vertical adva.

Keep reading

If you are still in college, consider doing internships at marketing and / or promotional companies. Read. Study. Take college or online courses in marketing. Learn the financial aspect. Break down doors. Respond to ads. NETWORK. Enter at ground level. Get started with a company, get nice to the marketing guys, and apply when there's a vacancy.

Unfortunately, the answer is the same as getting any specialization. You need talent, drive, meeting the right people, tenacity, and a bit of luck and / or timing. Once you have Marketing on your resume, in any capacity, it will be infinitely more accessible for lateral / vertical advancement.

PS: If you've spent any time at a university, just list the school and your major on your resume. Many of my employers assumed (and did not verify) what my title was or not.

If you're in your 30s, I'm assuming you've been in marketing for almost 10 years and $ 60k is way below the mark for someone with that amount of experience, so you're telling me something is wrong here:

1) Location, you live outside of popular marketing cities like New York, Chicago, San Francisco and the competition for good employees in your area is low. If you only make $ 60k where you are, then your chances of changing careers in your 30s with 10 years of experience and making more money are slim. This means that you should look for communities that support your salary within your industry.

Keep reading

If you're in your 30s, I'm assuming you've been in marketing for almost 10 years and $ 60k is way below the mark for someone with that amount of experience, so you're telling me something is wrong here:

1) Location, you live outside of popular marketing cities like New York, Chicago, San Francisco and the competition for good employees in your area is low. If you only make $ 60k where you are, then your chances of changing careers in your 30s with 10 years of experience and making more money are slim. This means that you should look for communities that support your salary within your industry.

For comparison, here are the salary ranges for digital strategy roles working in the New York area.

Assistant Digital Strategist (1-4 years) - $ 45 - 75k
Digital Strategist (5 - 10 years) - $ 75 - 120k
Senior / Director Digital Strategist (11-15 years) $ 120 - 175k
VP Digital Strategist (15+ years) ) $ 175 - 225k

2) Competition. Since no one here has a personal relationship with you, we cannot validate this one.

Honestly, digital strategy is a fantastic career path that will get you where you need to be, you just need to be in the right place to take advantage of that. You must also be proactive to achieve this. Ask any marketing person living in a marketing hub area how many agencies they worked for before age 35. Usually the answer is in the range of 4-5. This is due to the high turnover rate in the industry and the competition for great employees, they jump into a new job every 2-3 years and with that jump comes another $ 15-20k a year.

I know other people talked about getting an MBA, but the degrees don't make sense compared to the actual experience in the world of marketing. They give you maybe 15k more in the entry-level position, but not for someone in their 30s.

Other Guides:


GET SPECIAL OFFER FROM OUR PARTNER.