How should you find tech job opportunities in Europe?

Updated on : December 8, 2021 by David Marshall



How should you find tech job opportunities in Europe?

The best way to get a job in Europe is to connect with a career coach from Europe. These experts spend a great deal of time understanding country policies, company expectations, and labor market information. Connecting with them will give you a better perspective towards your goals. These experts have helped numerous people with their job search endeavor and have helped them achieve their goals.

Connect with these verified professional advisers at ACHNET Inc and explore all the opportunities in Europe. Make a coaching request on the platform to connect with these experts and connect

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The best way to get a job in Europe is to connect with a career coach from Europe. These experts spend a great deal of time understanding country policies, company expectations, and labor market information. Connecting with them will give you a better perspective towards your goals. These experts have helped numerous people with their job search endeavor and have helped them achieve their goals.

Connect with these verified professional advisers at ACHNET Inc and explore all the opportunities in Europe. Make a coaching request on the platform to connect with these experts and connect with them in a free discovery session and get valuable advice, once you are sure of the offers and the value they provide, opt for their services.

I often look at CrunchBase to see who gets funded. The advanced search feature (http://www.crunchbase.com/search/advanced/companies) allows you to search by radio for a specific location and if you enter options to include only companies that have received funding since a recent date , You will get a list in your area. Good luck.

Skype is currently looking for talented Product Managers across Europe. Otherwise, sites like eu.techcrunch.com, gigaom.com, and businessinsider.com will give you a good overview of companies that are trending. For information on startups, I'd recommend searching for organizations like Y Combinator and Seedcamp, as well as sites like eu-startups.com and thenextweb.com. Once you've identified potential suitors, they usually have openings listed on your company's websites. I hope this helps.

I don't have proper research elsewhere, but in Germany, Honeypot is number 1; and there is also an interesting portal focused on Berlin startups:

Honeypot: the developer-centric work platform

http://berlinstartupjobs.com/

These are all start-ups hiring developers in London. It's worth searching their job pages to see if they are hiring product managers as well.

http://siliconmilkroundabout.com/companies

Let me share my experience with you. I am a computer engineer with a total of 4.7 years of experience in software development in India. I started looking for work in the US / Europe 1.5 years ago. I was very naive as I wasn't really sure about this and started browsing the web to find ways to search for jobs in the US / Europe. After some elaborate research (on what I could do), below were the options for me:

1 Long-term on-site of Indian company -> (I did not have this option in my company)

2 Get a job (employer) in the US / Europe and apply for a work permit for that country by showing an offer letter to their respective

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Let me share my experience with you. I am a computer engineer with a total of 4.7 years of experience in software development in India. I started looking for work in the US / Europe 1.5 years ago. I was very naive as I wasn't really sure about this and started browsing the web to find ways to search for jobs in the US / Europe. After some elaborate research (on what I could do), below were the options for me:

1 Long-term on-site of Indian company -> (I did not have this option in my company)

2 Get a job (employer) in USA / Europe and apply for a work permit for that country by showing an offer letter to your respective visa consulate -> (The work visa requires a WORK offer and employers They were NOT ready to give jobs without VISA, so this is a loop.)

3 To mitigate the problems under option 2, apply for permanent residence for a country and then look for work there. But this option was not available for the US and many good European countries. In addition, this option still requires (mostly) that you travel to the country for which you have secured public relations (Australia, Canada have public relations options with skilled workers without even having a JOB so that the employer can be interested in your profile, since they will not have to request it). your visa) and then look for work there at your own cost, which is not guaranteed yet (I've read a lot of posts that even after getting PR people were struggling to find a good job, but again there might be exceptions. Take a chance if is your priority).

4 Join a consultant who will help you in your job search and can get you some interview calls from the country you are interested in -> (My personal opinion is don't be fooled. The only thing they are interested in is your money. I joined any consultancy --- thank goodness :) --- but I did speak with many of them and I was not very convinced)

5 Take a master's course (or a course that is relevant to your field) in that country so that you can enter that country through a student visa, complete the course, and get a job through an interview at the campus (or any other opportunity). As you would be in the center, you will get to know many opportunities and exits -> (This option is good / safe and saves time. It is an investment both in terms of money and preparation for the exam, but again, if it is your priority then is very promising.)

6 Apply on your own and keep doing it until you find a good job.

After looking at all of my options, I decided to go ahead with Option 6 and started applying on my own. To be honest, getting results from this option was less guaranteed and the time it might take was not safe either. Through my 1.5 year job search, I applied to USA / Europe / Australia / Canada / New Zealand via Linkedin, different job search websites (Linked was by far the most helpful ).

Most of the time I never used to get a response and for the ones I got it was a rejection saying that I did not have a work visa for your country so my application is rejected without even taking an interview. Many of the responses I received from different European countries used to be in their local language and I used to translate it into English only to find that they are also rejected :( stating the same reason.

In short, I got the 51 rejections in 1.5 years worldwide without even receiving an interview call because I did not have a work visa for that country and nobody was ready to sponsor my visa because I did not reside (not even student) / Know language of his country.

Until then, I lost all hope until I finally got an interview call from a German company (I applied at some point via LinkedIn) and I knew this was my only chance. Fortunately, everything went well and I finally received an offer letter from his side that finally brought me a German work visa as well.

When I look back at the time that I spent (thankfully it was only 1.5 years or for some it could be ohhh 1.5 years depending on your patience) I think if I had not had this opportunity that I wanted so much, what options did I have? ? and the answer was "Hope".

If I had to suggest something to someone based on my experience, here is my opinion: if someone really wants to get a job in the US / Europe, etc. and you have some budget, then Option 5 (Do a masters course) is the best. bet that is quite guaranteed and also timely. Think of it as an investment whose return is very fruitful.

The only reason I avoid endorsing option 6 is because it requires more than just your capabilities, it requires luck, luck to receive interview calls, luck to receive other calls if you don't do well in an interview, which is not in your hand and it is something that can happen within a day or a month or a year as I said is a hope.

Choose the option that suits you best and go ahead.

Apologies for a very long answer, but I thought this elaboration was necessary.

I hope that helps.

All the best :)

The closest you will get to a respected tech hub outside of Europe are: London, Dublin and Amsterdam, with Berlin's tech scene growing the fastest on the continent. The rest are beta-level cities that may have a Google, Facebook, or Amazon office, but only a small one and only because they need to capture some local talent while supporting a sales and management team.

London. When it comes to global tech cities, London is the largest in Europe and one of the largest on Earth. While it doesn't have a startup culture like Shenzhen or San Francisco, London is still a tech hub with the most talent you'll find.

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The closest you will get to a respected tech hub outside of Europe are: London, Dublin and Amsterdam, with Berlin's tech scene growing the fastest on the continent. The rest are beta-level cities that may have a Google, Facebook, or Amazon office, but only a small one and only because they need to capture some local talent while supporting a sales and management team.

London. When it comes to global tech cities, London is the largest in Europe and one of the largest on Earth. While it doesn't have a startup culture like Shenzhen or San Francisco, London is still a tech hub with the most talent you'll find in Europe. In that, it can compete with Tokyo, Seattle and New York for talent. That's why the world's largest tech companies make sure to set up an office in London if they want to enter Europe. In many ways, London is second only to York York as the financial capital of the world and that means, regardless of the industry, you set up an office there with a lot of people.

But there is Brexit. Will this make a difference? I think so. It won't shut down the tech scene in London because even though it will leave the EU, the EU still wants Chinese and American tech companies there. London is a staging area. I suspect that Brexit will help increase the tech scene in Dublin, Berlin, and Amsterdam, with Dublin taking over the bulk of any tech change.

The fact is, for many companies hailing from the US, they still want their biggest tech campuses to be in English-speaking countries. That does not mean that Barcelona or Berlin are not good places. It just means that when you transplant a culture to a new continent, in addition to a business-friendly environment, having the lowest possible language barrier is important THEN, as long as the company works in a country that doesn't speak English, they can. so with the local headquarters a two hour flight, instead of a 10 hour flight.

Some of this also explains why places like Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Stockholm, and to a lesser extent Berlin are popular with American tech companies - their populations (especially the Netherlands, Denmark, and Sweden) have a much better understanding of the English language. than any other. another non-native English country except Israel. The latter is appropriate given that it is also a large tech hub (and a secondary tech bureau for American corporations) in Asia alongside Singapore.

That really depends on a lot of things. First of all, you don't get a work permit in Europe, you get a job and then the employer gets you a work permit. Generally speaking, it is quite difficult to enter all countries without the proper background and experience. The UK is probably the hardest to come by as today they even have a quota on how many foreigners can get a work permit.

So to answer your question, your chances depend on:

  • your professional experience: any country where your profession is in high demand will make it easier to get a job
  • known languages: if you speak the local language,
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That really depends on a lot of things. First of all, you don't get a work permit in Europe, you get a job and then the employer gets you a work permit. Generally speaking, it is quite difficult to enter all countries without the proper background and experience. The UK is probably the hardest to come by as today they even have a quota on how many foreigners can get a work permit.

So to answer your question, your chances depend on:

  • your professional experience: any country where your profession is in high demand will make it easier to get a job
  • Known languages: If you already speak the local language, it will be easier to find a transfer job
  • Experience - If you have a lot of work experience, this will make the process of getting a job much easier
  • Presence in the country: If you trained in Europe instead of outside Europe, that will be a great advantage.


The fact is that many Indians get jobs in European companies in India through outsourcing; In reality, the move to Europe for work reasons usually occurs through internal transfer, not through the direct recruitment of a new graduate. If you expect to be taken out of India to Europe, unless you have a skill set that is very specific and in demand, that is highly unlikely to happen. So if your life goal is to move to Europe and work there, you realistically have two tracks:

  1. practice your trade in India and become an expert, and after a couple of years use that experience to move to Europe
  2. do a master's degree in Europe, where it is much easier to get a student permit, and once you graduate, the doors will be much more open for you

Apart from the UK, there is really no country more or less difficult to obtain a permit; if a company needs it, they will take care of it for you. If no company wants you, you will not enter.

If you are not a citizen of the EU or a citizen of Switzerland or Norway, it will be difficult for you to obtain the right to work in Europe.

I have a little knowledge of the process in the UK, I think other countries have similar rules and regulations.

People from outside the EU can apply for UK work / residence visas if a company sponsors them. If you have skills and experience that qualify you for 'hard to fill' job vacancies published by the British government. The skills requested are finance, technology, computers, medicine, engineering, science. They generally require at least a bachelor's degree.

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If you are not a citizen of the EU or a citizen of Switzerland or Norway, it will be difficult for you to obtain the right to work in Europe.

I have a little knowledge of the process in the UK, I think other countries have similar rules and regulations.

People from outside the EU can apply for UK work / residence visas if a company sponsors them. If you have skills and experience that qualify you for 'hard to fill' job vacancies published by the British government. The skills requested are finance, technology, computers, medicine, engineering, science. They generally require at least a bachelor's degree and 3 years of industry experience in the relevant field. The government also specifies a minimum wage range that an employer must offer. If you are lucky enough to qualify for one of these difficult to fill positions, the employer can apply for a work visa on your behalf, one of the criteria would be that they cannot find a local EU citizen who can fill their position,

This process is somewhat slow, it can take anywhere from a few months to the better part of a year for a visa to finally be approved, and there is no guarantee that the sponsored worker will actually show up for work at the end. Therefore, unless you are truly the best in your field, most companies would find this excessively problematic and costly for most positions.

So to answer your question, the best way to land a job in Europe is to have impeccable academic qualifications and many years of experience in leading companies or institutions that make you clearly more qualified than local candidates. Good luck with that.

It depends solely and exclusively on the type of work.

Highly skilled work or specialized academic work is in high demand, not only in IT, but also in science or the medical profession.

Looking for such a job would be relatively easy and, most importantly, it would meet all the conditions for obtaining a work visa. Usually, in such cases, the company would take care of the paperwork and could even provide accommodation, at least temporary.

However, finding any kind of manual or even unskilled work is very difficult, even more so for non-EU citizens.

These job seekers usually finish or

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It depends solely and exclusively on the type of work.

Highly skilled work or specialized academic work is in high demand, not only in IT, but also in science or the medical profession.

Looking for such a job would be relatively easy and, most importantly, it would meet all the conditions for obtaining a work visa. Usually, in such cases, the company would take care of the paperwork and could even provide accommodation, at least temporary.

However, finding any kind of manual or even unskilled work is very difficult, even more so for non-EU citizens.

These job seekers often end up in the slave markets of southern Europe, where they wait for temporary and illegal employment on farms, or they end up in overcrowded cold, moldy neighborhoods in northern Europe, trying to find a day job for a subcontractor of a company. subcontractor on a construction site. Women can also join the sex profession, yet statistics say that more and more men, especially illegal immigrants, are following the same path to nowhere.

There is also a small middle ground for nurses and so on, but these people often come to Europe with the help of agencies in their home countries.

So there is a really stark contrast in job prospects for non-EU citizens within Europe. The highly qualified will be able to earn very good salaries and will seriously enjoy their stay in Europe due to its safety, cleanliness, good infrastructure and excellent quality of life.

The unskilled, however, will suffer tremendously and will be regarded as unwanted human garbage.

There is no black and white answer. And it has to be more focused on the city of that country.

If you just want any previous job, the quality of life is the deciding factor. I like Munich, Barcelona, ​​Zurich and London, but all for different reasons.

If you are in technology, which is my experience, the choices will depend on your personality.

If you like working in a structured environment, Germany is a good bet. Small businesses can also be quite innovative. Note that German innovation is mainly focused on mechanical engineering. Stuttgart and Munich are good options

If you like startups, London, Paris and

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There is no black and white answer. And it has to be more focused on the city of that country.

If you just want any previous job, the quality of life is the deciding factor. I like Munich, Barcelona, ​​Zurich and London, but all for different reasons.

If you are in technology, which is my experience, the choices will depend on your personality.

If you like working in a structured environment, Germany is a good bet. Small businesses can also be quite innovative. Note that German innovation is mainly focused on mechanical engineering. Stuttgart and Munich are good options

If you like startups, London, Paris, and Berlin are hot spots.

While Italy is a wonderful place to visit or work as an expat outside of the local economy, the working conditions, pay, and bureaucracy are a nightmare.

All that being said, it will come down to your employer and colleagues if you do it right, anywhere can be fun and satisfying.

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