How should one prepare for a Google campus location interview?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Caitlin Hudson



How should one prepare for a Google campus location interview?

I'm not talking about the interview round. But I have attended a written test conducted by them. The test consists of two parts. one is the objective part that contains 20 mcq and in the other part you will be given a program that you will have to code (this will be mainly dynamic programming). Out of 20, almost 10 are from DSA, remaining from OS, C language, aptitude. You can view the document at this link
Google location questions

For Google location interview, you need to know well the data structure in C ++ in addition to the algorithms.

I spent three weeks preparing for the telephone interview and an additional two weeks for the on-site interview. I basically stopped using the computer to code and did it only on a whiteboard (you can get one for € 5) or on a sheet of paper.

I spent 2.5 hours getting ready every day during the week and 8 hours on the weekends. The first thing I did was create a schedule of the things I wanted to do each day, things like: Solve two algorithm problems, a design problem, implement A *, implement a red-black tree, etc. I did it because the first day I panicked trying to learn a little from eve

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I spent three weeks preparing for the telephone interview and an additional two weeks for the on-site interview. I basically stopped using the computer to code and did it only on a whiteboard (you can get one for € 5) or on a sheet of paper.

I spent 2.5 hours getting ready every day during the week and 8 hours on the weekends. The first thing I did was create a schedule of the things I wanted to do each day, things like: Solve two algorithm problems, a design problem, implement A *, implement a red-black tree, etc. I did it because The first day I panicked trying to learn a little bit of everything at the same time, thinking that I needed to know everything right away. Creating a plan helped me focus on a few topics a day knowing that I would have time to study everything I wanted to prepare. On weekends I also took time, 1 to 1.5 hours, to review what I had studied for the rest of the week.

The last but not least part of my preparation was getting friends who went through the Google interview process to do a mock interview with me. I have almost a mock interview every weekend (sometimes two). The information received from these interviews was invaluable. It helped me to correct my communication errors in time. They also helped me design a series of steps that I would use to solve each type of problem (basically one for algorithm problems and one for design problems).

I also stopped all the coding and algorithms to work out the preparations a day or two before the actual interview. This is a policy that I developed during the time I studied for my exams at the university. The reason is: if you prepared well enough, solving that extra problem a day before won't help your overall skills much, but if you can't solve it, you will really freak out, think that you are not ready and that is certainly the last thing you need. . At that point I concentrated on preparing for the soft skills questions. Things like: what was your biggest challenge, the hardest mistake, etc. You will have 5 interviews in a day, at least one guy will ask you a question about soft skills and you better be prepared for it (in fact,

To prepare it I used the following books:

  1. Breaking the Coding Interview - By far the best resource on interviews. The only thing I'd like to add to the book is: don't write code when solving design questions. Think of boxes that represent modules and their relationships. I was not asked to write code in the design interview and I think writing code may force you to oversimplify design problems. In fact, I was asked two problems taken directly from this book.
  2. Intro to algorithms - I used this to review data structures and remember how they work. I didn't bother solving your problems as it's mostly about testing things. While I'm not against demonstrating, that's not what the interview is about.
  3. Probability and Statistics by Morris H. DeGroot. The recruiters mentioned that there could be problems with the combintronics during the interview, and the first chapters of this book are perfect for explaining it. The book has many practical problems on the subject, which is perfect because the combintronics problems in most discrete math books are mainly about proofs. I continued to the first half of the chapter on probability distributions (actually, only until I got the correct binomial distribution).
  4. Head First Design Patterns: Design was my weak area, so I put a lot of effort into improving it. I tried many times with the book "Design Patterns: Reusable Object Oriented Software Elements" but never fully understood it. Head First is an excellent book on general design. What I learned by reading will definitely help me a lot in my real life. It's best to prepare for design problems if you have a very experienced programmer or architect to help you. Unfortunately the ones I know are colleagues of mine and I couldn't count on them, so I had to devise a process to solve these kinds of problems.
  5. Hackers Delight: During the process, it is almost certain that at least one problem will be playing with bits (I have one on that). This is by far the best book on the subject.
  6. I also read the Google articles on GFS and MapReduce, and they actually asked me questions that could be solved very easily using them. Interviewers may not allow you to use GFS or MapReduce in your solution, but mentioning how you would solve your problem with them will definitely give you an advantage. Read them!

Despite the recruiters' suggestion, I personally did not find “Programming Pearls” or “Exposed Programming Interviews” particularly helpful. The first two chapters or pearls of programming are fine, but you won't miss a lot if you don't read them. The rest of the pearls are mostly about relevant issues in the 70s or 80s, that is, when he started talking about how cool it is to use arrays instead of naming your variables a1, a2, etc. I realized that he was written for B programmers and I stopped reading it. The second book has a good introduction to the interview process, but nothing that is not in Cracking the Coding Interview, and the problems are so easy that they are not a challenge to solve and therefore not very good to prepare. If you want to spend your money wisely,

Other resources I used were:

  1. Wikipedia: I based my implementations of the Dijkstra, A *, and Knuth-Morris-Pratt algorithms on those from wikipedia. I also went through other things here as I think it is easier to understand than Cormen's technical book.
  2. CareerCup is a great site to find some questions. However, I must say that questions marked Google tend to be full of students trying to get you to solve your homework, so sometimes the questions are really weird. Check out the ones marked amazon, they tend to be great.
  3. The Euler project has many or good problems. I solved the first 50 of them. They are not the type of questions that they are going to ask you, but they put your mind in problem solving mode.
  4. I found that one of the best ways to learn about many algorithms is to check how they are implemented in the standard C ++ library. Or at least think about how you would implement them if you were writing the STL. For example, I had never wondered before how to implement an algorithm to generate all permutations of a set until I checked it in the STL.
  5. Many people will recommend using the upper encoder. Despite all my efforts, I never got it to work on my computer, so I had to do without it. I guess if you don't have access to Cormen's book, his tutorials are some of the best on the internet.
  6. OverTheWire: Wargames has links to some of the best tutorials on the internet on many topics. I used it a long time ago, not for this interview, but I learned a lot from it. In particular, I was only able to really understand how a program is mapped to memory thanks to your tutorials.

On a final note, I must say that the goal of preparation is simply to get your brain in the right mindset. After all that training, it was surprising to see that once I saw a problem, I immediately knew what data structure to use and what the algorithm would look like. That is the point you want to get to. The problems themselves are irrelevant, but the right problem-solving mindset is everything.

Did I get an offer? Well, I still don't know. I'm pretty sure about interviews 2-5. I solved the problems without major difficulties. But I was so nervous that I think I screwed up the first one, so I don't know. I'll say it when I have an answer.

I was going through a lot of questions already answered with a lot of upvotes and good advice. All the information helps, since it is about a student's career. I appreciate all the valuable information and advice shared by the enlightened ones.

My introduction to those who don't know me. You can check my personal accounts on Insta or Fb, but why would I?

Well, after reading them, I will say that if any of you think you have every possible idea to locate off campus, you are wrong. The distance between you and your first job is the same as all the ideas you have in your head and

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I was going through a lot of questions already answered with a lot of upvotes and good advice. All the information helps, since it is about a student's career. I appreciate all the valuable information and advice shared by the enlightened ones.

My introduction to those who don't know me. You can check my personal accounts on Insta or Fb, but why would I?

Well, after reading them, I will say that if any of you think you have every possible idea to locate off campus, you are wrong. The distance between you and your first job is the same as all the ideas you have in your head and you implement them. Is it really that hard.

Well, after reading my answer, you will know all the possible ways you will need and you will be way ahead in the career if you agree with me on this point that getting a job in IT today is like a career, of different kinds for everyone. Some win the sprint, others win the marathon.

So I'll tell you my story instead of giving you advice. The facts speak for themselves. This story is going to be very long, so if you have any other more important work, you can complete it first.

So my name is Rahul Akhouri, I was born and they brought me to Ranchi. I'm pretty good at academics, never the topper type, but rather crude. I never got more than 90 points in math, but also less than 80. And my rank in class was never in the top 10. But I was in a very good school with many talented boys, so there are no complaints. When I was in the seventh class, I still remember that I was the second best classified in my class with 87 points, the highest being 99. All classes, including other firsts, were in their 70s or below that. That was because everyone was having trouble solving the algebra that had just been introduced. Also in that year, I got a gold medal in a math competition with a 99.2% percentile across the Indian level. Only 3 students from my school got that. So at this point, you might be thinking that I'm some kind of genius or something like that. Well,

After that, when I passed 10th place, the real competition started in the good and simple life of your school. I struggled in the early days and in my eleventh year at my college I failed in Physics. He couldn't believe that he could ever fail a term exam. I thought about it a lot and yes, the physics is really confusing and deep, which I realized. Then I totally devoted myself to physics sitting in the university library for hours and solving problems. I took it as a challenge, I always do. I never give up until I'm knocked out. And the interest, curiosity and love for physics made it my favorite and strongest subject.

Well, after a lot of hard work, dedication, love and passion for science and a dream of getting into a higher IIT in 2003, I couldn't even pass the preliminary exam. That day when the results came in, I became aware of the real competition in India and had a clear idea that I am not the only one with extraordinary skills and talents. There are many. Well, I actually realized that not most guys are talented like me, but they are more dedicated, disciplined, well informed, and most importantly under someone's guidance, which makes the difference between a pure and polished talent. It took me 3 years to realize that and on that day in 2006, when after the fourth attempt I was also unable to remove IITs or even ILS, I realized how important targeting, environment and momentum is.

Remember, this is what I concluded that day.

Result = Orientation + Environment + Moment (Talent, Skills, Background, Attitude, etc.)

Now here I am now, sitting in Pune to bring you lots of ideas and working in a machine learning and NLP start-up, and also launching my own education start-up. Am I a genius now as well as school days in front of my friends and family? Well I don't really know that to be honest. But I have my talents and everyone has them.

Now let me ask you who opts for off campus.

  1. IIT / NITS / Tier 1 colleges looking for a great start and following their passion if they can't find it through campus recruits. Well, those guys are more informed than I am. I don't need to tell you how to find what you want.
  2. Tier 2/3 colleges with good locations, but some students turn down offers for other plans or location preferences or for any other reason and most of them are left hanging between those plans and off-campus locations. It is very difficult to complete an aptitude test in campus interviews versus open campus selection. Here I see a lot of off-campus location platforms talked about as litmus and others, but they are only for the 95% percentile score type. What about the rest of the 95% guys? Well, some get jobs through referrals or local placements. Still, I guess 85% go unplaced.
  3. Level 4/5 universities have no locations and most of the time they are distant from IT centers like Pune, NCR or Bangalore. They are the ones who suffer the most. Those students are left behind due to lack of further guidance. Yes, I agree that many of them are not suitable for the software industry, but many of them, if shown the right path, can do much better in their life than preparing for GATE, bank exams, and then, after a while, they are nowhere. Many of them think that they are even fresher after 4 or 5 years, but the industry does not think the same way.

Getting a job off campus is easy. Follow this:

  1. Nobody wants rookies, you can't change that fact. You can complain or yell, but the reality on the ground doesn't change.
  2. So what are the options? There is only one option and one that will work 200%. Other things can work, like finding a job through referrals or internships, but getting to a good place that way is difficult and only a few make it.
  3. Do you know what technologies are in demand? Don't believe me or anyone else. Just do a search on naukri and you will know what the real reality is.
  4. You know startups and small businesses are struggling to find good developers, so if you raise your level to an experienced guy, there are a lot of jobs for most of you?
  5. At the end of the day, remember that delivery is important, if you get better than a lot of seasoned guys, they won't be hired.

So my mantra is very simple, as I said before: choose a technology that is in demand and study it for the next year by spending 12 hours or more every day. If any of you are out of place after that, give me a call and tell me that my advice was just a prophecy than a reality. On the same day, I will close the start up of my education.

Disclaimer: This is my personal answer and it is not endorsed by Google.

You must absolutely master technical interviews. The best way to do this is to do mock interviews with friends who are already in the industry and / or frequently go to job interviews with the intention of failing early and often.

Most people with many years of experience are bitterly surprised to find that what they learned as the fundamentals in college ends up being absolutely critical to being successful during the interview process. In industry, many people let these skills rust because their day-to-day work ends with us.

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Disclaimer: This is my personal answer and it is not endorsed by Google.

You must absolutely master technical interviews. The best way to do this is to do mock interviews with friends who are already in the industry and / or frequently go to job interviews with the intention of failing early and often.

Most people with many years of experience are bitterly surprised to find that what they learned as the fundamentals in college ends up being absolutely critical to being successful during the interview process. In industry, many people let these skills rust because their daily work ends up using many abstract concepts that are already in place. For example, no one reinvents sorting or piles on a daily basis, or has to explain how hashmaps work internally, but this is exactly the kind of question you should be prepared to answer in your sleep and assemble complete solutions from 30 intervals of a minute. As a student, you are (or will soon be) fresh in this knowledge, so you have an advantage. There are people who get defensive when they find out about this. Don't be distracted by them. Check:

2008 "Yegge rants" about getting a job at Google (it's accurate enough and explains the dynamics of the "other side" really well)
http://steve-yegge.blogspot.com/2008/03/get-that -job -at-google.html

Also consider speaking out loud about the projects you do in your spare time (both literally and in an SEO sense). You should always be playing with things. That is the symptom of a creative mind that other creative minds like to work with. Build something. And be strong about it. Show it to as many people as you can, as often as you can while you are evolving it. Most likely, one of the people in your network will tell someone else to end up referring you as an intern. In the course of speaking out loud about your project, also state your goal of working at Google.

The internship is best scheduled for the summer, so get off your butt in winter and spring, and do something visible. Also be prepared to troubleshoot on the spot when prompted.

Many of my "recent grad" friends who are fresh with their basic computer skills tend to screw up interviews because it is so obvious, when they are on site, that they don't have a "warm hand" with coding. This is symptomatic of someone not coding for pleasure (therefore out of practice) and waiting for a "job" to get you to code. Don't fall for it. Pick the problems you like to solve and practice creating the best coded solutions, then post them on your website and build visibility and trust from others.

Finally, take a look at a few things:

1. Take the time and solve at least 10-20 difficult questions (with quizzes) each in 30 minutes, NOT using an IDE or compiler. You can find many of these questions on the Internet. Search for "Technical Interview Questions" and filter by Google, Microsoft, Facebook, etc. Generally, companies of similar size and domain ask similar questions. You will actually code them on the board, and that is what you need to prepare for.

2. Don't waste time on riddles (the Internet is full of them). They are a thing of the past and are not asked, because they are not considered a predictor of success.

3. Visibility, Visibility, Visibility. Everyone I know who has half the chance of landing an internship has already been passively "sold" through the evidence of their work: online projects, posts, code samples, technical arguments, and so on. The first thing people do before recommending you (even their friends) is they look for you and see if the evidence of your work sells itself in the uphill process.

When I was in their situation several years ago, it was easy to start thinking, "Interviewers want to show that I am unqualified; I need to find a way to make them believe that I am qualified." That used to lead to a lot of false answers. In fact, in my later experiences, it is quite the opposite. Everyone from the person who originally has the thought in his head to refer to the people who interview him to the committee that decides to let him in, wait - no, they want it deeply !!! - may you succeed and triumph. When someone qualifies throughout the process, everyone involved feels more successful. It's all about scheduling it correctly, making it easy for others to see, and preparing for the opportunity that you will undoubtedly get because you are thinking about it from the start.

Be like the kind carpenter, sitting in a small shop, surrounded by his craft. Let your craft sell you. Spend your time on your craft and display it around the proverbial store for others to see. That image is far more memorable than pursuing any miraculous personal approach (most people spend a lot of time laying their eggs in this basket and they don't have a plan B). The friendly carpenter will always find customers until that great opportunity comes along, and who knows what that great opportunity will look like, maybe even the next Google.

I hope this helps. If anything is missing please let me know and I will do an edit update.

It was somewhat anticlimactic and easier than I expected.

While in school, I read many stories saying that the Google interview was by far the most difficult in the industry. So, I came up with the following plan to get into Google:

  1. Spice up my resume with two years of industry experience and multiple contributions to open source projects (at the time, I didn't know a 'new graduate' position existed)
  2. Simultaneously study algorithms from a rigorous source for 1.5 years. My goal was to master algorithmic thinking, because if you can think like, say, Dijkstra, then you can solve any
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It was somewhat anticlimactic and easier than I expected.

While in school, I read many stories saying that the Google interview was by far the most difficult in the industry. So, I came up with the following plan to get into Google:

  1. Spice up my resume with two years of industry experience and multiple contributions to open source projects (at the time, I didn't know a 'new graduate' position existed)
  2. Simultaneously study algorithms from a rigorous source for 1.5 years. My goal was to master algorithmic thinking, because if you can think like, say, Dijkstra, then you can solve any problem that comes your way. I reasoned that the Stanford computer material was the best source for this purpose, so I set out to master the material in this course: A Second Course in Algorithms, Winter 2016
  3. Spend the last 0.5 years studying subjects that Google actually tests. This engages the subjects in Leetcode.

I ran this plan for 7 months. I got a position at some random company and read through Lesson 8 in the Stanford course (although I'd say I've only gained true mastery through Lesson 2).

Then the company I was in had a leadership change and I got little to no direction from top executives. In the absence of significant work to do, I decided to look for a new position.

I applied to a group of startups, thinking that they would be more willing to take risks with less experienced people, but this turned out to be false. I also casually submitted my resume to Google, but was not expecting a response. But it turns out that I got an answer after just over a month for a phone interview.

At this point, I had already moved on to step 3 of my plan for about a month. My goal was to be able to produce optimal solutions for any difficult level problem in less than 45 minutes. However, in the interview, I was able to do this reliably only on Graph related problems (where it was stronger). Most Array problems have obvious N ^ 2 solutions, but very complicated N solutions, and N solutions often take me all day along with some research to get there.

Therefore, during the telephone interview, he did not expect to get it right. This feeling made me mess up some things that I wouldn't have messed up in a more casual setting. They asked me a question about the result of x | = 0x0101, and I wrote the result for & = instead, only to find out later. For the actual algorithm problem, I also missed some cases. I then sent my recruiter a writing of the correct solution, but I'm not sure if it was read.

Fortunately, I was very good at explaining my pattern of thought, and that, along with a near-correct solution, got me the on-site interview.

Reflecting a bit on the phone interview, I realized that the Google questions are actually not as difficult as some of the hard-level problems in Leetcode. I continued to practice on difficult problems, but on the site, I was much more confident in my abilities.

I was able to produce optimal results for 3 of the 5 problems they gave me, an N ^ 3 solution instead of an N ^ 2 solution for one, and I was able to describe a correct solution, but I didn't code it 100% correctly for the latter.

A week later an update came in that I passed the hiring committee review and then came the team matchup and then an offer.

In any company, to get a job we all have to go through 3 different stages:

1. Aptitude test

2. Technical interview and

3. HR interview.

The first thing you have to do is pass the aptitude test. I know people have good technical knowledge and communication skills, yet they cannot pass the first round of placement on the aptitude test. It often happens that people fail the aptitude test round when we take aptitude tests unprepared or for the first time, due to poor performance. because people don't take the aptitude test round seriously and don't prepare for it either.

but you have t

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In any company, to get a job we all have to go through 3 different stages:

1. Aptitude test

2. Technical interview and

3. HR interview.

The first thing you have to do is pass the aptitude test. I know people have good technical knowledge and communication skills, yet they cannot pass the first round of placement on the aptitude test. It often happens that people fail the aptitude test round when we take aptitude tests unprepared or for the first time, due to poor performance. because people don't take the aptitude test round seriously and don't prepare for it either.

But you have to pass the first aptitude test if you want a job in the company of your dreams.

so here i discuss some point about aptitude test that you can pay attention to

An aptitude test generally consists of three sections

1. quantitative aptitude

2. Logical reasoning and

3. Verbal skill sections.

Here are some points to keep in mind regarding these:

1. Quantitative aptitude

First, work on your calculation skills. increase your computing speed and try to solve problems within a certain time limit.

keep the important topics in mind for this, you can refer to the previous question docs to get a better idea about which topics are important.

Try to solve all the important questions without seeing the solution to those questions and practice repeatedly.

here I mention some important topics that you can consult for your preparation

Divisibility

HCM and LCM

Numbers, Decimal Fractions, and Power

Loss of profits

Simple and compound interest

Time, speed and distance

Reverse

Engineering Mathematical Logarithms

Permutations and combinations

Probability

2. Logical reasoning

Increase your logical reasoning by practicing more and more questions on different topics so you can gain Speed ​​and improve your time management skills.

Check out different resources and find shortcuts, tips and tricks to solve any particular question and learn to increase your problem solving skills as well.

clarify your concept on each important topic.

Check off all the topics that are repeated on each aptitude test.

here I mention some important topics that you can consult for your preparation

Relationship-based questions

Seating arrangement

Blood relations

Addresses

Encoding and decoding

Series ending

Deductive logic coding

Data sufficiency, directional sense, logical word

Puzzle

Number string pattern recognition and encoding pattern

Recognition of patterns of analogy and classification

3. Verbal ability

I think this is an issue that everyone gets stuck on at least once in their life. and some people still suffer from this problem and complain about this problem that they cannot speak English fluently, their vocabulary is very poor, their grammar is also weak. But trust me, forget about all these things and start practicing speaking English, no matter how bad your vocabulary is, you don't follow the grammar rules, your pronunciation is weak, don't think about it, just start speaking English.

To improve your vocabulary read different books in English like novels, story books, whatever you like. so that you also improve your pronunciation.

Write articles or stories in English that you know in your native language so that you can improve your grammar.

Talking to yourself in English means asking yourself a question and answering that question in English because when you speak to yourself, you feel confident speaking English because there is no one to put you off because of your weak English.

The aptitude test is the first step towards your dream job. So, make sure your goal is to be at the top of the test scores, not just to erase the limit. Take the free mock exams online, visit the website that offers different mock aptitude tests. You can also refer to the Prepbyte Placement Preparation Schedule, where you can get

Video lectures, mock interviews, mock tests, aptitude practice, English communication, soft skills, and guidance from expert mentors so you can prepare for aptitude tests.

I recently sat down for placements at the IIT Kanpur campus and got the first day. Sitting down for IIT campus placements is an incredible journey that is a combination of your hard work, luck, and belief in yourself. I had written an answer on this last week citing my experience with it. Nishu Jain's answer to What did you learn from the campus placement experience at IIT?

I had specifically prepared myself for supporting roles. I believe that if you set goals and set daily goals, surely you can secure a deserving job at locations on campus. I would like to go step by step in the preparation.

  1. Talk to your seni
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I recently sat down for placements at the IIT Kanpur campus and got the first day. Sitting down for IIT campus placements is an incredible journey that is a combination of your hard work, luck, and belief in yourself. I had written an answer on this last week citing my experience with it. Nishu Jain's answer to What did you learn from the campus placement experience at IIT?

I had specifically prepared myself for supporting roles. I believe that if you set goals and set daily goals, surely you can secure a deserving job at locations on campus. I would like to go step by step in the preparation.

  1. Talk to your seniors - this should be the first step before starting your prep. You need to know what the company is looking for and what to prepare. They can also guide you with their experiences and sources.
  2. Design a Plan - Generally secondary roles require you to have a decent resume, strong aptitude skills, basic technical skills, and good communication skills. The roles I sat for required basic statistical knowledge and coding skills.
    You need to make a plan about what to study and where to study from.
  3. Preparing the resume - This is one of the most important steps in campus placements. Sometimes a person who has passed all the tests cannot pass the interviews just because they have a mediocre resume.
    A resume is about selling yourself. Get it reviewed by someone you trust who will give you honest reviews.
  4. Prepare for aptitude and reasoning: I had prepared my aptitude and reasoning from the following sources:
    1. Pariksha (beginner level)
    2. Prepleaf (medium to hard questions)
    3. Arun Sharma for quantitative aptitude
    And if you take regular Pariksha tests and Preview and practice of Arun Sharma's book, trust me, you're ready to go.
    I had approved the aptitude of almost every company I had applied for, in addition to the 2 companies :-(
  5. Prepare for riddles and conjectures: some companies like Goldman Sachs, JP Morgan, Blackrock, etc. they ask riddles about probability. Some common sources are Brainstellar, Geeks for Geeks, Interview Bit, etc. He had prepared from the first two sources.
    Guesses are often asked in interviews. Indus Insights asks for a rough estimate in their test. The IITB case book is good for that.
  6. Learn Probability and Statistics - This is extremely important for non-basic and quantitative roles. If you haven't taken any such courses in your curriculum, be sure to take an online course on probability and statistics. Analytics companies are looking for statistical skills.
  7. For interviews: I had taken some courses on financial economics, finance basics, etc. to have an advantage during interviews in finance positions. Although the finance companies that visit campus don't expect you to have a finance background, I prepared myself because I had time. For the case interviews, I had reviewed the case books of IITB, IIMA, Victor Cheng, etc.
  8. Prepare HR Interview Questions - This is also one of the most underrated areas where most students are lacking. I had prepared a document and written answers to all kinds of HR questions and resume-based questions 15 days before my interview. It helped a lot to build self-confidence. Get it checked too. You must appear prepared in front of the interviewer. Make sure to read all of those responses out loud in front of the mirror the day before.
  9. Learn a little coding: Don't be offended, but the requirement for software engineers is at its peak. There are many software companies that visit IIT every year. You should learn basic algorithms and coding. He had practiced coding Interview Bit. It helped me pass the Goldman Sachs, Trexquant, Walmart, etc. test.
  10. Have faith and trust: always remember to believe in yourself and have confidence. Give the best of you. Always remember that campus placements are only one phase, good or bad, this is definitely not the end.

PS: For the main roles, I think having a solid understanding of your topic can keep you going.

Thank you A2A Pramod Gadekar

The courses and profile you mentioned are not my cup of tea and therefore I would rather give you some general advice that may be helpful for your preparation. Remember, I am not going to touch on the technical side and therefore when it comes to the technical aspects I would sum it up in one line by saying "grab the basics and dive into them".

Moving on to other aspects of a recruiting drive, it usually consists of a group discussion and an interview. Let's go into each of these one by one:

GROUP DISCUSSION:

This round of exercise generally checks an indiv

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Thank you A2A Pramod Gadekar

The courses and profile you mentioned are not my cup of tea and therefore I would rather give you some general advice that may be helpful for your preparation. Remember, I am not going to touch on the technical side and therefore when it comes to the technical aspects I would sum it up in one line by saying "grab the basics and dive into them".

Moving on to other aspects of a recruiting drive, it usually consists of a group discussion and an interview. Let's go into each of these one by one:

GROUP DISCUSSION:

This round of exercise generally checks the various abilities of an individual, such as how does he present a point in a diverse group of people, how good is he as a team player, is he cordial? is dominating? What do you think about a particular aspect? etc.

Here are some important tips for group discussion:

1. Start the discussion. That doesn't mean you talk nonsense and start the discussion just for the sake of it. If you are starting it, present your points which can be arbitrary or balanced, depending on the topic and your knowledge / thoughts on it.

2. Allow others to speak. This is very important. No matter how much you know about the topic, let others speak and present their points. Show that you also accept the opinions of others without being overbearing.

3. Maintain an upright posture. This is also important for the interview, so why not start with a group discussion? Show your confidence, alertness, and enthusiasm.

4. Actively participate in the discussion. If you start the discussion, add a few more points in the middle without denying anyone a chance to speak.

5. Steal the points. This is a quality, not a delusion. Suppose if you come across such a topic that is out of your knowledge, it becomes difficult to collect points, and therefore wait for some time before speaking. Take cues from what others are talking about and then get involved in the discussion.

6. Be up to date with current topics. A lot is happening in the world these days. Stay up-to-date with issues / topics that may be favorites for discussion. Apart from this, there are some conventional topics that need to be prepared and they can be accessed through the Internet.

7. Maintain eye contact. If you don't do this and speak pointing to a specific individual in the group, it shows your shyness and may be a recipe for your rejection.

8. Don't look at the watchers. There is a tendency to look to the watchers if someone puts a strong point for or in an argument. Remember, you are there to discuss something and not to impress them. It is just a hypothetical situation from a real workplace where a lot of meetings / discussions take place.

9. Concise communication. Talk to the point. There is no point in becoming a charlatan and talking nonsense. Stay to the point and keep them concise and clear.

10. Maintain a steady tone. Your decibel determines your behavior. Therefore, keep the pitch not too high and not too low as well. It should be audible and should not sound sarcastic / harsh / domineering, etc.

INTERVIEW:

Remember, the interview is a two-way communication and not an interrogation. Also, an interview flows in the direction you want it to flow. There are some points for a good interview:

1. Dress well. Don't be a miser and try to fool interviewers by wearing an unsophisticated, borrowed dress that doesn't fit your skin at all. Spend some money on yourself, you are going to look for a white collar job and not a daily salary. Dress appropriately.

2. Have a firm handshake. As soon as you meet the other person, shake hands firmly, but don't hold their hands tightly or too loosely. A firm handshake with a warm smile and eye contact starts the interview on a positive note.

3. Save your resume. Very often, in various drills that I run, this is an emerging pattern that applicants don't even know what they've written in that two-page garbage. If their strength is leadership, they say something different. Save everything on your resume. If you give an incorrect answer, it creates a negative impact.

3. Justify your strengths / hobbies. This is born again from my personal experience. Applicants do not know why a particular strength is their strength or, very often, they give a very cheap justification for it. It is not necessary to have five strengths / hobbies. Keep them two or three, but they must be duly justified.

4. Be diplomatic. Don't be an honest nerd saying everything. You should streamline the interview and steer the flow in the direction you prefer. If you give the interviewer a chance to dominate, you've already ruined the rest of the interview.

In this case, the issue of "weakness" needs to be specifically addressed because it can sometimes backfire on you.

5. Have a good set of questions ready. When the recruiter hands you the ball on his court to ask a few questions, ask them. Ask about the long-term strategies of the company, what it is doing to achieve its vision / goals, what its work culture is like (if you have mentioned the work culture as one of the reasons for your aspirations to work with the company, do not be silly asking about work culture.)

One of the best interview tips I've come across is talking about the interviewer journey and how you overcame the demanding challenges. This way, you feel good about the conversation and maximize your selection possibilities.

6. Always keep the ball in your court. The best interview advice I have ever received was from my late older brother, who had a basic concept that says "you are the host of your own interview" and it fits perfectly into how an interview unfolds.

By this, what I mean is that you don't provide an unnecessary set of details that might evoke further questions. Frame your answers in such a way that the path of an interview deviates according to your needs.

7. Know the company. Know everything. By everything, I mean everything.


Hope it helps you ... Thanks

Hello there,

Technical interviews are different from traditional job interviews. These interviews include situational questions, behavioral questions and obviously technical questions. Knowing the kinds of questions that are always being asked helps you prepare well and answer carefully and show your skills and talents.

Technical interviews have puzzles, technical competence, and problem-solving questions. The interview will judge your technical knowledge, skills and abilities in relation to the need for the job you are applying for.

They will also be watching your thought process while sun

Keep reading

Hello there,

Technical interviews are different from traditional job interviews. These interviews include situational questions, behavioral questions and obviously technical questions. Knowing the kinds of questions that are always being asked helps you prepare well and answer carefully and show your skills and talents.

Technical interviews have puzzles, technical competence, and problem-solving questions. The interview will judge your technical knowledge, skills and abilities in relation to the need for the job you are applying for.

They will also observe your thought process as they solve a problem and how it will fit into the company culture.

Proper guidance is much needed for preparing for these interviews. I would suggest you seek help from mentors from PrepInsta. They helped me a lot with my interview preparations. They gave me a list of some most asked questions and how to answer them.

Some tips to prepare for interview which Atulya sir (my mentor from PrepInsta) told me which helped me a lot and hope so will be useful for you too:

  • Be prepared to prove your points:- Just having certificates doesn't justify anything. So read and know about every certificate or everything you have written in your resume.
  • Know different methods to solve a problem:- Technical questions usually have several right answers, so make sure you know everything about your process and have some basic idea about others too.
  • Explain your reasoning:- You need to out stand with your answer as technical questions usually have a specific answer. So try to explain your point.
  • Elaborate on answers you don’t know:- If you don’t know the answer to any question tell them. But tell them how you would try to find the answer to the problem if such a situation arises.

All the best.

There are two categories of Coding Interviews (Other than technical)

  • Face to face Round
  • Online Round (Hackerrank or HackerEarth , etc)

Online Round

  • You will be given a simple problem with lot of corner cases to handle.
  • There will be around 5 to 15 test cases depends on the problem. Every test case will have a score.

Face to Face Round

  • Interviewers check your way of thinking and understanding of data structures. (Oh Sorry! They expect you to answer what they know)
  • Here are some example programs.
  • Given an array where all elements occurred twice but one element occurred only once. Find that item.
    • Example
Keep reading

There are two categories of coding interviews (other than technical)

  • Face to face Ronda
  • Online round (Hackerrank or HackerEarth, etc.)

Online round

  • It will give you a simple problem with many corner cases to handle.
  • There will be around 5 to 15 test cases depending on the problem. Each test case will have a score.

Round face to face

  • Interviewers check your thinking and understanding of data structures. (Oh sorry! They expect you to answer what they know)
  • Below are some sample programs.
  • Given an array where all elements occurred twice but one element occurred only once. Find that item.
    • Example: {3, 4, 4,2, 3}, Result: 2 ((Occurred only once)
    • Our solution
      • Use two loops to compare.
      • Use counting matrix
    • Expected solution
      • XOR de todos los elementos dan el resultado. (Lógica: 1 ^ 1 = 0, EXOR con los mismos elementos dará como resultado cero.
  • Find the middle node in a linked list. (Length is not given)
    • Our Solution
      • Traverse once , find the length (len)
      • Traverse again len/2 times to reach middle node.
    • Expected solution
      • Use two pointers named slowPointer and fastPointer.
      • Move slowPointer one at a time and fastPointer two at a time
      • slowPointer = slowPointer.next
      • fastPointer = fastPointer.next.next
      • When fastPointer reaches end of the list , slowPointer will be on the middle node.
  • Find Kth node from end of a linked list ((Same as above Problem))

Resources to Prepare

  • "Crack the interview" by Gayle Laakmann
  • "DS and Algorithms made easy" by Narasimha karumanchi
  • Data Structures basics - Video Tutorial
  • Some Interview Questions - Video Tutorial
  • I personally suggest
    • GeeksforGeeks
    • InterviewBit
    • Leetcode

TCS written test has 2 sections:

  1. Email writting
  2. Aptitude + Logical Reasoning


In email writing, you will be given a simple situation and some 5-6 words for which you should write an email using all those words given in 10 minutes. I use all those words in writing.
And deleting this section is very important because your next section will not be revised if you fail this section.

For the Fitness section, prepare some common topics like

  • Percentage and ratios
  • Work and time
  • Boats and streams
  • Trains
  • Accelerate time and distance
  • Numbers
Keep reading

The TCS written test has 2 sections:

  1. Email writing
  2. Aptitude + logical reasoning


In email writing, you will be given a simple situation and some 5-6 words for which you should write an email using all those words given in 10 minutes. I use all those words in writing.
And deleting this section is very important because your next section will not be revised if you fail this section.

For the Fitness section, prepare some common topics like

  • Percentage and ratios
  • Work and time
  • Boats and streams
  • Trains
  • Accelerate time and distance
  • Numbering system
  • Serie


And for logical reasoning get ready

  • Blood relations
  • Puzzle


Do focus more on above important topics,but study other topics also.
Refer RS Agrawal or any other Book you like but do Practice a lot beacause questions will be lenghty to solve in given time.

Thanks for A2A.
Best of luck.

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