How satisfied are OSE OPs with their jobs?

Updated on : January 21, 2022 by Evan Stevens



How satisfied are OSE OPs with their jobs?

When I completed my 1 year career as a branch manager, I would like to try this question.

So, starting with the PO tag. This label will be there for only 2 years. And let me tell you that that is the best part of your career, those 2 years were like the honeymoon period for an officer. Immediately after the 2 years of probation, you will be called an officer, not a PO. So my point here is that a buy order will not remain a buy order forever.

I would like to share my experience here.

I joined as a PO in 2016 with low expectations, because I got this job out of nowhere.

I have a subway post at the beginning, Hyderabad.

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When I completed my 1 year career as a branch manager, I would like to try this question.

So, starting with the PO tag. This label will be there for only 2 years. And let me tell you that that is the best part of your career, those 2 years were like the honeymoon period for an officer. Immediately after the 2 years of probation, you will be called an officer, not a PO. So my point here is that a buy order will not remain a buy order forever.

I would like to share my experience here.

I joined as a PO in 2016 with low expectations, because I got this job out of nowhere.

I have a subway post at the beginning, Hyderabad. Being a local boy as it is my mother's hometown. I know every corner of the city and that's why I started my career with a kick. They put me in the job of doing digital marketing and sourcing in the first 2 months, I did it without any problem. To make digital products, I choose the local undergraduate universities, to name one of the universities, if I remember correctly, it is the kasturba women's undergraduate university. In a single day I made about 560 friend applications. And turned the head of the controllers. All I just did is get 10 active girls to volunteer on behalf of sbi, because we are authorized to do so at the time of demonetization. It is just a presence of mind to seize the opportunity to win the situation. And thanks to this achievement, my CEO was congratulated for giving more than 1,500 friend downloads in a single month.

After this digital marketing, my boss put me in the job of collecting pending AOFs, which is a hectic task. There were about 300 on the list, because it is a 40-year-old branch. All day I usually call clients and have them return the form to me, I used to go visit the client's house, for this purpose I got the car from the branch and the driver. So all set, I did the work and did the pending numbers from 300 to 6.

Then after this assignment I was given a seat to learn general banking, I did the miscellaneous jobs for almost 1 month and then I got my cell training which is the best part of my entire career.

We were a batch of 5 POs, sent for training in different cells, called processing cells that are specialized in processing loans, clearing checks, currency exchange, processing accounts, and obtaining loans.

This period was like college life for us. He used to roam the city on weekdays, splitting work hours from the office and saying that we had been in marketing with obviously zero supply. So we enjoy for 4 months. Meanwhile I completed my JAIIB. And also in this period we received institutional training in SBLC. I visited jabalpur in madhya pradesh and trichy in tamil nadu. Here we were able to meet our batch mates from different states. And the workouts were like unlimited fun and food, but limited knowledge. 😝

I was transferred to another branch, a branch that was only 50 km from my hometown, thus considering it the luckiest post on probation, because my first destination was 400 km from my home.

But in this branch, I was constantly put to work in a fixed position, like helping the field officer, so the daily routine work is making crop loans, women's group loans, and downloadable loans. And the boss in this branch is like you have work to do, you call vishnu, he is there to do any kind of work. And I have to be pleased with that.

So here I used to put my best effort, because I'm in a comfort zone being close to home, so I worked hard and learned about the advancement section in this branch.

9 months completed and 3 more to complete my probation, at this stage they took me out of the branch and gave me the personal loan business job through YONO, which is the PAPL, they put me in this job for almost 9 months and I was congratulated 2 times in that period for keeping our region as the best performer in the entire circle (state) in this segment.

In the meantime, I completed my CAIIB, was promoted to scale2 after parole, and was sent as a branch manager to a one-man officer branch.

Now, in these 2 years of probation, I also appeared for many exams related to my experience, but I did not manage to break.

Now, after assuming the position as branch manager, I have achieved my business goals 150%. Well, there is pressure, but if you know the job and if the task is under your control, you can always perform well.

So, I can say that I am satisfied with my career. Like I said, the PO tag will only be there for 2 years and I enjoyed that tag, always being the best test officer under the boss.

Taking on any task as a challenge is what makes you the best. Focus only on the task. Complete it. Repeat. That's the way he does it.

Now if you want to hear some more satisfying responses from SBI POs, you can listen to the stories of the current and former SBI president. They are also OP early in their careers. Great inspiration.

I left SBI as a PO about a month ago and I think I can answer this.

Working pressure: Yes! Yes! Yes!

I am from Maharashtra stationed at a rural branch in Maharashtra itself for my second year of probation. So after receiving my rural position, I was really excited. I really wanted to get away from the hustle and bustle of the city, into the attractive green landscape of the town. A few days after I joined the branch and I was already feeling the pressure my branch manager was going through. One day my branch manager received a call from the regional office. They were asking him to promote SBI Life. No

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I left SBI as a PO about a month ago and I think I can answer this.

Working pressure: Yes! Yes! Yes!

I am from Maharashtra stationed at a rural branch in Maharashtra itself for my second year of probation. So after receiving my rural position, I was really excited. I really wanted to get away from the hustle and bustle of the city, into the attractive green landscape of the town. A few days after I joined the branch and I was already feeling the pressure my branch manager was going through. One day my branch manager received a call from the regional office. They were asking him to promote SBI Life. Now this is a rural branch where a customer barely keeps his minimum balance. Good luck offering the SBI life to those clients. A customer came in who was yelling for no apparent reason. The atmosphere had become so chaotic and the pressure was so high that my bowel movement almost passed out due to low blood pressure. We had to rush him to the district hospital which was 2 hours from our town. Note that the branch is scale 2, which means that the BM is no more than 32 to 33 years old.

Rural publications: Yes! Yes! Yes!

Now I have nothing against rural branches. But fifteen days after I moved to this town from my hometown, I was sent to an even more remote branch. It was only about 25 km, but it took me almost 3 hours a day to get there one way. The reason is that there was no transportation available. I even had to walk 5-6km a day until I got off any bike or something. It was almost like hitchhiking. Initially the experience seems new and pleasant, but after a few days it becomes a problem. Since you can sometimes arrive at the branch at 12pm. M. Even after leaving between 8 and 8:30 in the morning. Only to travel 25kms. And it is an icing on the cake when the BM of this branch complains to the regional office that you are late (it really happened in my case).

Work-life balance: No! No! No!

For most of the time I was at SBI, I had little personal life left. It was always work, work, work. And without life, life, life. And when he was stationed in rural branches, he had to work even the second and fourth Saturdays, every Sunday, and even some government holidays. He would leave at 8-8.30 and return between 10-10.30. These times wear you out even if you have the energy of the superman. I even had to miss the marriage of one of my best friends. I asked one of my colleagues about my friend's marriage. And the answer I got was “SBI me aaneke baad ye Sab bhul jaaneka. Maine apni khud ki shadi weekend pe rakhi thi becoz of leave issue "

Leave leave: Ha! Say ah! Say ah!

I have actually seen my BM, where I was initially posted during my rural assignment, struggle to get permits. Now I understand that work life is a big part of our life. But when you work in a bank, your work life is all you have. Even with license balances, the higher authority is always reluctant to sanction licenses. And this guy comes from a completely different state all together. Imagine posted in a branch where 90% of customers do not understand what you are talking about. On top of that, your license is rejected when you just want to spend time with your family to celebrate your son's birthday. Even if you have a license balance.

Is it about money ?: Yes! Yes! Yes!

By then I had already seen my BM struggling with the objectives that the regional office had given it. Once I was sent to the regional office. In fact, I came to know why these people keep giving branches unreachable goals. The reason is that they themselves get goals from their bosses. So it is a one-way string. Their boss gives them objectives and so they pass and put great pressure on the branch. In fact, I have seen people like AGM pushing for goals. So if no one is happy, why do they keep doing it? It's about money, honey!

My opinion: As for myself, I have always believed in family above all else. I worked in a town very far from my family. There was always the issue of the license. The work pressure was tremendous. Neither your clients nor your higher authority cooperate. You can't always satisfy every customer. And even the people I looked up to, like AGM, DGM, seemed to be very frustrated with their jobs. And finally one day I woke up at 7.30 in the morning. I was still tired because I had arrived very late the night before and walked almost 4 miles after working until 7pm. I wondered if I don't want to work there, why do I keep working there? He was still half asleep. That day I had decided that I would not stay here. I slept for a while, went to the branch at 11 in the morning and submitted my resignation.

This post is not to discourage anyone from joining SBI. I didn't want to sacrifice all the things I mentioned earlier. Therefore, leaving the organization for a more suitable candidate than me.

Goodbye OSE.

I am a 2020 Batch OSE PO posted at a rural branch in
Ahmedabad circle 1.
Work pressure problem: mutual insurance fund cross-selling etc, and the villagers don't really care about all that

Solution: Not everyone can afford it, but we know who can do it, and there are so many amazing accounts at every branch, even if it's a rural one, just keep sitting at your desk, make a decision if that person would benefit from the plan, and ask hello at Rs. 100 will get 2 lakh insurance or if he can pay more say it like 1000 rs, you will only get 20 lakh insurance
Out of every 100 people you will meet at any time

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I am a 2020 Batch OSE PO posted at a rural branch in
Ahmedabad circle 1.
Work pressure problem: mutual insurance fund cross-selling etc, and the villagers don't really care about all that

Solution: Not everyone can afford it, but we know who can do it, and there are so many amazing accounts at every branch, even if it's a rural one, just keep sitting at your desk, make a decision if that person would benefit from the plan, and ask hello at Rs. 100 will get 2 lakh insurance or if he can pay more say it like 1000rs, you will only get 20 lakh insurance
Out of every 100 people you will meet anyway its not that hard to make sales

2.
Problem of publication in rural areas: far from home and without the comforts that are obtained in the cities

Solution: well not really a solution, but be prepared to know that minimum 2-year rural posts are mandatory throughout your entire career
once you finish your required rural posts, try entering forex, treasury, or else that , the most probable thing is that from then on he will spend 80% of his life in cities.

3.
Work-life balance issue: no time for you

Solution - Make up your time, I rented a house in the same town where I work, I go out to the branch at 9.50 a.m. and come back, let's say at 8 (in the worst case), during probation most days you went out around 7
o'clock I personally Leave around 5.30 and now during the confinement it is 2.30 pm

So is 10 hours of work too much?

4.
Permit issue - When you are the branch manager (2 year minimum requirement), it is difficult to take permits.

It is not a solution, but I am just saying that you are allowed 1 leave for every 11 days of work and about 12 or 30 sick leave, I am new so I don't know all that.

but recently I took almost a week off and I didn't ask him, I told my BM I'm going home for a week and he was really good with it.
So I guess it depends on your BM

Generally, some people face really bad situations with idiotic customers and cruel branch managers, but there is a silver lining, it is not permanent.

The short answer is that very seldom in this entire professional world is a person completely satisfied with their work. But the additional problem with the SBI PO job is that it creates a problem in running your family affairs and also puts a lot of strain on professional duty.

  1. I was from the PO 2010 lot. I got my first place in a rural location during the trial period. They sent me to learn basic functions, but I just printed notebooks all the time. This became a trend until my branch passed, which came a year later. A friend of mine asked GM during a meeting at SBLC why there is no training. He replied
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The short answer is that very seldom in this entire professional world is a person completely satisfied with their work. But the additional problem with the SBI PO job is that it creates a problem in running your family affairs and also puts a lot of strain on professional duty.

  1. I was from the PO 2010 lot. I got my first place in a rural location during the trial period. They sent me to learn basic functions, but I just printed notebooks all the time. This became a trend until my branch passed, which came a year later. A friend of mine asked GM during a meeting at SBLC why there is no training. He replied that this was the culture of the past and that now the POs have to help achieve the objectives. But keep in mind that all the questions on your PO exam will be training.
  2. But by the way and on my First Confirmed Post, I got really good and was the AGM frontrunner to achieve PBD's loan goals. I acquired enough knowledge during my experience. My suggestion for newly hired OPs. Don't worry if you don't receive training during the trial period. The structure of the Bank has become like this. Just peacefully pass the testing time and prepare for the exam. You will learn how to bank at work and not through documents. Try to get into the habit of reading the electronic newsletter every day. That habit helped me the most during my time.
  3. Work-life balance. Does not exist. Don't run to him. There will always be new goals when you achieve yours. If you achieve your goals, you will be given more because you are efficient. Try to improve your life among all of these. Like I used to do with PBD loan clients. He used to give them a specific time to come and at least the youngsters used to respect that, even if their parents didn't. In this way, I had breaks in between.
  4. Please get out of the mindset that you are doing a government job. If you go out, it helps you. I know that customers can be rude many times. I have faced this. All I did was make myself think it's not personal. That helped.
  5. I quit my job because I wanted to earn more and saw that my classmates in college were growing faster even though they couldn't pass the PO exam. They were in other industries. I'm 50% satisfied in my current job, but I don't have to worry about salary, licenses, work-life balance, and hustle and bustle. That is the only difference.

I joined SBI in 1974 as a Probation Officer or PO. I worked until 2000 and took early retirement to join the private sector. Had I continued, I would have retired in 2012.

This was a time when PO at SBI was one of the few opportunities for recent graduates and postgraduates. I had the option of going to the United States with a teaching assistantship to do my PhD in Chemistry or to join SBI. For some reason I chose SBI. I'm not sure if I made the best choice, but in my opinion it was a good choice.

Here is my take on a career at SBI as a PO. The first place I went was State Bank Staff College in Hyder

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I joined SBI in 1974 as a Probation Officer or PO. I worked until 2000 and took early retirement to join the private sector. Had I continued, I would have retired in 2012.

This was a time when PO at SBI was one of the few opportunities for recent graduates and postgraduates. I had the option of going to the United States with a teaching assistantship to do my PhD in Chemistry or to join SBI. For some reason I chose SBI. I'm not sure if I made the best choice, but in my opinion it was a good choice.

Here is my take on a career at SBI as a PO. The first place I went was State Bank Staff College in Hyderabad, where my group did an orientation program. I was there for 10 days and among other things we had the privilege of interacting with a legendary banker, our president at the time, Mr. RK Talwar. He gave us 3 hours of his precious time and even stayed for lunch with us talking informally. Then we had an intermediate program, in Indore in my case. This was done for us to learn the basics of banking through a simulated bank.

My first branch was in Hoshangabad, a small town in Madhya Pradesh. Then it was Satna, Raipur, Narsinghpur and Bhopal where I went through an apprenticeship in various branches learning all aspects of the job. This was for two years. The Bank also organized an intermediate course in Vadodra, Baroda at the time. In general, a two-year apprenticeship reinforced by institutional training provided a very good foundation.

We were assigned to branch offices or LHOs (local headquarters) shortly after parole. Over a period of time, I was sent to different positions, each of which provided good learning. Although I was never sent abroad, I was sent twice to training programs in Switzerland and Japan. As a result of such diverse experiences, I was able to move to private banks once as Karnataka State Director and once as Senior Vice President in charge of Products and Marketing.

This also helped build a career in consulting, allowing me to work on IT-related projects as an independent consultant hired by some big-name companies.

These days, those who join as OPs receive very good salaries and benefits, unlike in our time, when we were left to our own devices. We could never dream of buying a car during the trial period as no loans were made. However, the camaraderie of the group mates and the seniors and juniors among the PO fraternity was tremendous and we had the benefit of sharing knowledge, having fun, watching movies, and generally making friendships that are still very strong.

Many of my batchmates have risen to president and CEO positions at SBI and some at other banks. SBI would put you in critical roles and you learned to swim.

Workload? I'm surprised the current batch of OPs think they have a heavy workload. All I can say is that SBI is the best training school and the more you learn in it, the better it prepares you not only for work but also for life.

Also, the best talent these days never go for SBI. The uncertainties in the race are too much. A bad loan could delay or derail your promotion. A bad report could set you back years.

However, unless you defraud the bank or steal, your career will progress and you will be guaranteed a steady salary and good benefits. No other bank, Indian or foreign, can compare to SBI for the way it prepares everyone to handle any situation, PO or Promoter. It is a very professional organization, more than any other I have ever known.

I read this question and was reminded of a YouTube video titled 'Cunning Leadership', in which Professor L Prasad is taking a session at IIM Bangalore and says the following words:

“So we wanted happiness. And if you thought that we gave people a difficult time, this is your generation, the one that was born between 1970 and 1990, and for you happiness is not enough. You want euphoria. And if you thought you were giving people a hard time, wait for the ones who are going to drive, the ones who were born after 1990, who are now coming to the workplace in large numbers. For them, they want nirvana.

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I read this question and was reminded of a YouTube video titled 'Cunning Leadership', in which Professor L Prasad is taking a session at IIM Bangalore and says the following words:

“So we wanted happiness. And if you thought that we gave people a difficult time, this is your generation, the one that was born between 1970 and 1990, and for you happiness is not enough. You want euphoria. And if you thought you were giving people a hard time, wait for the ones who are going to drive, the ones who were born after 1990, who are now coming to the workplace in large numbers. For them, they want nirvana. And if you don't give them nirvana, their moms dads will come and scold you. "

If you have read this, you have probably understood that I am not going to say whether the OSE OPs are happy with their work or not, but rather I am going to bring perspective to the table.


The first thing to know is that happiness is subjective.

When it comes to happiness at work, for some people happiness is money. For others, it's simply a matter of having an easy job and making decent money for it. For many, it's more about career development and learning on the job.

When it comes to personal satisfaction, for some people money is happiness. For some, family is happiness and for some their addiction is happiness (be it a hobby or some other type of addiction).

And the question is, when is a person happy? To keep it simple, this is when you have what you want.


Now coming to my position. I am currently 24 years old. I don't have a fancy B.Tech. from an IIT or an MBA from an IIM. Have 2 years of banking experience and a total experience of 3.5 years.

  • I am appointed as a Branch Manager for a rural branch. (Responsibility - Yes, Learning - Yes).
  • I have a decent salary. (Money - Yes).
  • I am posted at home. (Another BIG benefit).

Even if I complain now, something is wrong with me. This work has objectives. This job has risks. This job has a great responsibility. But if I don't want it, I should just say that I shouldn't be a banker. These are professional dangers that all public sector banks must face. And you can't avoid them.


I don't know if I'm happy or not. But I leave it up to you to decide, if you should be happy or worried about work.

If you say that this job itself has flaws, then you are not cut out for that. But if you say that work is fine but there are other factors that are hampering your professional life, then you must understand that life is not a bed of roses (I am being a preacher here, I know).

If you want an easy job, you want to have a perfect family life, you want to be respected, you want a lot of knowledge and you want a lot of money, then you can start dreaming that such a job exists. (Please also tell me if you do).


Also, another question is what happens if the three factors I mentioned above are not met. This remains to be seen in my case. I would also like to experience the absence of one, two or even all three factors at least once, and then I would want to decide if it is easier to preach on quora or face real difficulties during work.


I hope you have it. Good luck.

PS: Link to video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9zI6GRt1s6Q

I have read some of the responses from some of my colleagues here and would like to take into account some thoughts of mine. I have to say that job satisfaction should be paramount for anyone who works. It should go beyond the obvious monetary benefits. I've had a pretty interesting life, so to speak. He studied in many parts of India, from Aizawl to Shillong, Darjeeling to Bangalore, Pondicherry to Delhi. I got two master's degrees in two very unconnected fields. Master in Biotechnology and Master in International Business. The reason I am highlighting my academic career is because I have never had any specific knowledge.

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I have read some of the responses from some of my colleagues here and would like to take into account some thoughts of mine. I have to say that job satisfaction should be paramount for anyone who works. It should go beyond the obvious monetary benefits. I've had a pretty interesting life, so to speak. He studied in many parts of India, from Aizawl to Shillong, Darjeeling to Bangalore, Pondicherry to Delhi. I got two master's degrees in two very unconnected fields. Master in Biotechnology and Master in International Business. The reason I am highlighting my academic career is because I have never had any specific interest in my professional career throughout my early life, as you can see. I just went where my whims and fantasies took me. But then I got into SBI. He wasn't that interested in work at first. But, in the first place, I never liked it at all. By the way, I joined SBI as PO in 2014. It is now 2018 and I am Dy Manager and I am very satisfied with my work at SBI. My reasons follow:

  1. As a PO, I was sent to 3 different states in the northeast: Meghalaya, Assam, and Mizoram. Different languages, cultures, people, etc. We had a great time. He took some of the most picturesque and beautiful places of all time. The on-the-job training was hectic, but it taught me so much more. It gave me the confidence to manage people, clients, colleagues and superiors.
  2. Yes, I had my fair share of hard-to-handle superiors, but that's a part of life, right? You cannot be so naive as to expect everything to go smoothly. You live and learn, you adapt and you excel. Just remember, anything that doesn't kill you makes you stronger. The more you complain, the more you suffer ... mentally. Just take things as they are and adapt.
  3. Every aspect of work at SBI is governed by circulars that are published regularly. Regarding working conditions, that is, human resources issues, please refer to the circulars. If it is there, no one can deny it or argue against it. Not even the president. It may be the case that some controllers deny the right or benefit of an employee even if it is in a circular; so that is a case for an individual to defend their rights. I personally never had a problem about it. A branch manager at whose branch I was stationed tried to deny me the furniture allowance during my probationary period. He took a booth, printed the corresponding circular and showed it to the branch manager. She couldn't reject me after that.
  4. I got my first assignment as a branch manager in a remote area. I did not receive any training in BM, so I had to continually learn on the job. It was tough, but it was worth it. I learned more in my 2 years as a BM in a single branch than my colleagues who have been in an urban branch for the last 10 to 15 years. What a confidence boost! I had to assume multiple roles, from cross-selling agent to field officer in the P segment, agriculture and SME segment, accountant and cashier officer; the only role I didn't do was sit at the cash desk. Otherwise I filled most of the roles in that 2 year period. I found the time to get married, take a 5 day honeymoon trip to Bali,
  5. I was transferred to the regional office where I am currently the desk officer in the audit cell. And it is very gratifying due to the need to have to know all the relevant topics from credit risk management, operational risk management, external compliance and self-audit. My job is basically to be a know-it-all about the Bank's systems and procedures, products: both loans and deposits, that is, to be an encyclopedia. I love learning as I go along and hopefully becoming a more competent banker.
  6. Having been on the job for just over 2 years and 11 months (i.e. after being confirmed), meeting people from all walks of life: farmers, entrepreneurs, teachers, traders, government officials, NGO representatives, politicians, just to name a few; Each and every one of the people I met has their own story to tell ... their aspirations and dreams, their reality, their pain and suffering. Most face their disappointments and failures because it is a part of life. Those who are happy with their work are happy and satisfied because they enjoy their work. Yes, they want a higher salary ... who doesn't? But then they still go to their jobs every day. Some do it because they have a family to take care of,
  7. For my part, I am now enjoying my career as a banker at SBI. Yes, it has its challenges. But only when gold is cleansed with fire does it become pure. The things that are really worth something in this world are the things that we have striven for. I am sure that I will have my share of bad experiences in the future, I also had them in the past. But I'm still standing and not just standing, I'm satisfied. In the end, isn't a fulfilling life the best anyone can hope for?

First of all, job satisfaction is a very subjective topic and differs from person to person. I would refrain from commenting on how satisfied I am with this job because I have my own reason for being satisfied and dissatisfied with this job, but seeing the negativity spread by many people about this job, I would tell you 2 main reasons why a lot of people don't is satisfied with this work:

  • Many applicants are in love with stability in a government job and have little or no interest in the banking sector. Once they enter the actual battlefield, reality hits them hard and dissolves
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First of all, job satisfaction is a very subjective topic and differs from person to person. I would refrain from commenting on how satisfied I am with this job because I have my own reason for being satisfied and dissatisfied with this job, but seeing the negativity spread by many people about this job, I would tell you 2 main reasons why a lot of people don't is satisfied with this work:

  • Many applicants are in love with stability in a government job and have little or no interest in the banking sector. Once they enter the actual battlefield, reality hits them hard and dissatisfaction quickly begins to stop.
  • Most of them have little or no previous work experience in an organization, which makes a huge difference, as SBI is all about learning on your own and making your way through many difficulties. The rookies in the group reach their threshold level very early and find it difficult to work in rural areas or perform tasks such as calling people and requesting documents, etc.

Now let's look at some of the positives of being an SBI:

  • Career prospects: Someone rightly said that "the sky is the limit" in this organization. Compared to a private organization where you end up being a mid-level employee for your entire tenure, SBI offers a lot of promotion opportunities, which is great motivation. In a normal scenario, one can end up becoming an AGM within 10 to 12 years.
  • Monetary outlook: Compared to other PSBs, SBI has a very lucrative package for entry-level officers with 4 increments up front and other monetary allowances from day one such as gasoline, medicine, newspapers, telephone, cleaning, etc.
  • Additional benefits: One-time furniture allowance of Rs. 1.25 lacs, maintenance allowance, entertainment allowance, utility allowance, mobile phone reimbursement, etc. Aside from this, personal home plans and auto loans come with many benefits and offer many long-term advantages.
  • Training: If you enter any of their training institutes with 10 rs in your pocket, you will leave with the same money. With top-notch training institutes and learning centers spread across the country, the training facilities are equipped with modern amenities and employees enjoy a good time to socialize along with learning.
  • Work culture: Having previously worked with a couple of multinational companies and a mid-size organization, the work culture here is extremely different. You won't be sitting in a decorated booth, you will be dealing with customers on a daily basis, and your little inquiries can make life difficult at times. Coming to work schedules, the entry time is fixed but the exit time is not fixed at all. Be prepared for that, sometimes also to work on weekends.
  • Work pressure: tell me a job that gives you growth without any pressure on your head. If there is pressure, there are many benefits waiting for you. It is a two-way street. On a lighter note, the pressure has increased and is going to increase in the near future due to stiff competition and increased public scrutiny. And yes, pressure exists in all the damn jobs in the world, albeit of varying nature and degree.
  • Job stability - This is what everyone is looking for and it is definitely a big boost to be a man in Indian society. Although promotions and transfers are hampered by your performance, job security exists in every way.

Thanks

av

Not at all!

Tired, frustrated, away from home, sad!

I broke CDS three times and wanted to join the military, things couldn't work out, I got an SSB lecture and tried the SBI po exam with average preparation. I was selected and got the Ahmedabad circle. Things were going well when I was in the training center, but when I received my first position, I was blown away! It is a village! Okay no problem. I may get used to it.

But then the real problem began. My branch manager told me to stay late at the bank, until 8-8:30, 'just because other officers were seated.' I said a resounding no. When I started reading anyway

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Not at all!

Tired, frustrated, away from home, sad!

I broke CDS three times and wanted to join the military, things couldn't work out, I got an SSB lecture and tried the SBI po exam with average preparation. I was selected and got the Ahmedabad circle. Things were going well when I was in the training center, but when I received my first position, I was blown away! It is a village! Okay no problem. I may get used to it.

But then the real problem began. My branch manager told me to stay late at the bank, until 8-8:30, 'just because other officers were seated.' I said a resounding no. When I started leaving early anyway, um sorry, 'on time', my BM started calling me daily for a month or so to get me to stay behind for 'a few minutes'. I resisted, I couldn't stay, that's all. I have to get home, have a life outside the bank. I must say folks, banking is not my cup of tea. 6 months later I am transferred again like the rest of my batchmates, to a new location about 40 km from here and I have to do everything from scratch. From finding a new home, changing, organizing tiffin service and most important of all, meeting new people. Maybe banking is not for me! This answer is not to demotivate you, make sure you want to do this, so you don't. sorry about this. I am trying to get out of this job, preparing for other job exams. The whole work culture seems to be ruined. Sure they pay well, but there is a limit to which you can compensate for your quality of life with money. I am from Delhi, I have always stayed in an urban setting, but as expected I will complain about my rural destination, I will not, it is fine. I will complain about: But there is a limit to which you can compensate for your quality of life with money. I am from Delhi, I have always stayed in an urban setting, but as expected I will complain about my rural destination, I will not, it is fine. I will complain about: But there is a limit to which you can compensate for your quality of life with money. I am from Delhi, I have always stayed in an urban setting, but as expected I will complain about my rural destination, I will not, it is fine. I will complain about:

1.Lack of fixed working hours

2 unreasonable goals

3 shortage of staff

4.Lack of staff training

I wish I was stronger enough to stay and correct these shortcomings of an organization, but I guess I am not.

To end this, get to know any organization you are going to work for, because you may regret your decision later on.

I joined SBI only 3 months ago so I don't know if I am qualified to answer this question. But still I will share my experience of the last 3 months.

It goes without saying that SBI is 'THE BANK' in the country, the financial situation of the country is highly dependent on SBI. Therefore, working for such an organization evokes a feeling of pride in yourself.

Now job satisfaction varies from person to person, so I will categorize it in different aspects.

SALARY: SBI offers the best salary package by far for any entry-level job, whether private or government. about 50k gross, 30k leased accommodation, furniture allowance, 100% me

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I joined SBI only 3 months ago so I don't know if I am qualified to answer this question. But still I will share my experience of the last 3 months.

It goes without saying that SBI is 'THE BANK' in the country, the financial situation of the country is highly dependent on SBI. Therefore, working for such an organization evokes a feeling of pride in yourself.

Now job satisfaction varies from person to person, so I will categorize it in different aspects.

SALARY: SBI offers the best salary package by far for any entry-level job, whether private or government. about 50k gross, 30k rented accommodation, furniture allowance, 100% medical bills, gasoline, mobile phone bills, entertainment allowance and the list goes on and on.

WORK ENVIRONMENT- I have found the work environment to be quite good, the offices, the infrastructure have been good, at least in Mumbai.

WORKING HOURS: Branch hours are generally of two categories.

One is the 9 a.m. branch. M.

Another is the 10 am branch

Since mine is a 9 a.m. branch, I have to check in at 8:45 a.m. and come home at 8 p.m. So it's more or less a 12 hour job.

WORK PRESSURE: I can't put it delicately, but the pressure is enormous. While it is relatively minor during the trial period, but once you confirm yourself, the pressure will increase, you will run to complete the objectives, sleeping comfortably at night will be a luxury (according to my senior's explanation).

CAREER OUTLOOK: At SBI, the sky's the limit, as long as you take your socks off. To begin with, one can become a branch manager after 2 years of service. You just need to complete your assignments, pass the exams, and no one can stop you from climbing the ladder. If you are extremely talented, you could even land a position abroad. And if anyone doesn't know yet, Ms. Arundhati Bhattacharya was also PO once.

FAMILY LIFE: forget it! It will be months and years before you meet your family. Since I joined, 3 months have passed and I have not seen my family.

TRANSFER POLICY: varies from person to person. If a person loves to travel, wants to see new places, make new friends, all without spending a single penny .. !! Then you are in the right place my friend. But if it is the opposite and you want to stay close to your family, then you will have a rather difficult time, as you will be transferred frequently during the trial period 2-3 times. Once confirmed, it will be transferred every 2-3 years.

since I am an avid traveler, I love this transfer policy. In the 3 months I have been trained in: -

GO TO

GURGAON

STATE BANK ACADEMY, GURGAON

Image Courtesy: - Google

MUMBAI

STATE BANK FOUNDATION INSTITUTE, CHETANA

Image Courtesy: - Google

So after three months of being part of the largest lender in India, I can say that I am satisfied.

EDIT 1: - It occurred to me that some of you thought that I had been transferred to these places. My apologies if my answer misleads you, but I have been to these places for a training that lasts a few weeks, where you can learn from top SBI faculties like AGM, DGM who take lectures themselves. The DMD (managing director of the department) addresses you. These few weeks are the best time, since you meet people from different circles, explore new places, without spending a single penny, since the cost of everything is borne by SBI, including accommodation, food, expenses of travel and even the interruption of the assignment for your stay at the training institute.

I worked at Bank of Baroda as a Probation Officer (PO) and many of my friends work at SBI as PO, so I feel like I am qualified to answer this question.

State Bank of India is the largest public sector bank in India. Even after merging some PSU banks with another PSU bank, SBI is still the largest. Applicants preparing for banking services always prefer SBI as they can get better salaries, benefits and allowances at SBI. All other PSU banks are roughly the same when compared to salary, benefits, and allowance, but at SBI you get 4 increments up front when you join. other Junior M benches

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I worked at Bank of Baroda as a Probation Officer (PO) and many of my friends work at SBI as PO, so I feel like I am qualified to answer this question.

State Bank of India is the largest public sector bank in India. Even after merging some PSU banks with another PSU bank, SBI is still the largest. Applicants preparing for banking services always prefer SBI as they can get better salaries, benefits and allowances at SBI. All other PSU banks are roughly the same when compared to salary, benefits, and allowance, but at SBI you get 4 increments up front when you join. Other banks The Junior Manager grade -I scale (popularly known as Probationary Officer) is Rs. 23700-980 / 7-30560-1145 / 2-32850-1310 / 7-42020. At the entry level, the basic salary of POs in another bank is 23,700, but in the SBI the basic salary is 23,700 + 4 * 980 = 27620 at the entry level. Aside from salary, SBI PO gets an attractive rental amount for the house of Rs. 30,000 for Mumbai compared to 20,000 rupees in other PSU banks. Same for the other assignment like Petrol,

So far, I have discussed the monetary part and compared it to the POs of other PSU banks. We will now discuss work-life balance for OSE POs. If we compare it with the purchase orders of other banks, the same result will come, since now all banks face the same situation of increase of NPA, increase of competition between banks for companies, increase of pressure working in all banks. But, it is not the condition of only banks. After leaving Bank of Baroda and joining here and working for up to 5 years, I can say that the grass always looks green on the other side and the taste just takes over the face. With massive retirements and fewer hiring, government jobs now have a lot of job pressure too. When I was sent to my old office, it was a division, I was informed by one of the seniors assigned there that a few years ago, there, as there were more than 7 inspectors assigned there, but when I got my assignment in the office, there were only 3 (including me) after my transfer, now only two are there with any additional duty to one of two. Now you see how the work pressure also increased in government offices.

I will conclude with the comment that it is said that everything has a price and nothing is free in this world. If the employer (be it bank, government or private) provides us with a good salary, accommodation or other facilities, then the job will not be as easy as we decide. We have to go with that.

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