How old was Mr. Agam Jain when he wrote civil services?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Walker Henry



How old was Mr. Agam Jain when he wrote civil services?

23 when I have my preliminaries.

24 when I gave main courses.

25 when I was doing a basic course in Mussoorie.

Having said that, I don't see much that is worth it in age-related matters.

Cleaning at 21 or 30 doesn't matter much until you gain enough experience and knowledge.

I will say again that the upsc is trivial and thus the related problem. You focus on gathering knowledge and good conduct in society.

That is all.

We all face problems, but they seem more difficult and impossible to solve during the initial stage. I faced the following issues:

  • How and where to start? - The study program is so broad that we have no idea where to enter. It is literally difficult. Since I had no one to guide me. I suffered from this problem for a little longer. I saw the interview of the toppers, I read articles on the net to get an idea about the starting point. Now, I think it's better to start from scratch to kick start the preparation. Similarly, I had trouble taking notes. Initially, it tends to find each
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We all face problems, but they seem more difficult and impossible to solve during the initial stage. I faced the following issues:

  • How and where to start? - The study program is so broad that we have no idea where to enter. It is literally difficult. Since I had no one to guide me. I suffered from this problem for a little longer. I saw the interview of the toppers, I read articles on the net to get an idea about the starting point. Now, I think it's better to start from scratch to kick start the preparation. Similarly, I had trouble taking notes. Initially, you tend to find everything that is important. You highlight each line. It happened to me too. I made some garbage notes. But I guess that's the only way to know what we're doing wrong. We can't just sit back and wait for the right moment to start taking notes.
  • Motivation: Most of the people selected are from IIT, IIM, will I be able to achieve it? People have made 2 to 3 to 4 attempts to eliminate it, will I suffer for 2 to 3 or 4 years in a row? What happens if I am still not selected? People had the backup plan, what if I am still unemployed after wasting time, parents money and their trust in me? And so many similar questions. This is natural. Believe me, we outdo ourselves when we have pressure (not in the amount that kills). So all I did was prepare. I said a few things to myself. As I used to say, I have this revenge (I failed the IIT after two attempts after the 12th) because of the IITians, and I will give them a tough fight (no hard feelings people!). As if I tried to develop a philosophical mindset and told myself that I will do my best,
  • Fixes: we have to change a lot for the exam. I had to move to Delhi which is not a good place to live (due to pollution, food and chaos the city has some positives otherwise). I did not go to my house for over a year. Meeting friends is still mere false promises. The dream of going on tour (I haven't seen Goa yet, believe me), reading fiction, doing sports, watching movies, making a girlfriend (s) is still very far away. I used to tell myself that once I get selected I will do it all. But again, life is not easy at any time.
  • Deciding optional, this was again a gigantic task. I met some older people in Delhi. Everyone had their own opinion. Sociology, history, anthropology, etc., whatever and they will tell you the problems with that option. I am grateful that I found them to further confuse me. They helped me to know that no option is easy or without challenges. It all comes down to your interest. But then I was interested in 2-3 optionals. Finally, I chose one with some logic, mainly due to luck. I think it's how you work on the optional instead of selecting the optional that matters in the end.

Now the next part. I got fewer marks in the initial simulations. True. All he did was push me to work harder. And gradually the results improved. We gain confidence only after deceiving ourselves. I used to tell myself that this is just the initial stage or this is because I was preparing for the optional and was not ready for the test or because the document was very factual and it would not come in UPSC or the others as well they went down. brands so no big deal. Therefore, it is good to deceive yourself to gain confidence, but not to be overconfident.

The bottom line is to work hard and be patient. It's worth it.

Jai Hind.

I want to explain the process that applicants go through, and then you can decide if civils is really as difficult as people say. They say that Civils (entering IAS) is the most difficult exam in the country because around 10,00,000 people apply every year for around 70 general category IAS seats. Your probability of getting IAS in one year is around 0.00007%. But other than that, what does the preparation for Civils look like? Let's do some calculations. There are approximately 10 main subjects that you should study. There are 10 other minor subjects. But for the sake of discussion, let's just talk about the ma

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I want to explain the process that applicants go through, and then you can decide if civils is really as difficult as people say. They say that Civils (entering IAS) is the most difficult exam in the country because around 10,00,000 people apply every year for around 70 general category IAS seats. Your probability of getting IAS in one year is around 0.00007%. But other than that, what does the preparation for Civils look like? Let's do some calculations. There are approximately 10 main subjects that you should study. There are 10 other minor subjects. But for the sake of argument, let's talk only about the main ones. For each topic, you should read about 4-5 books, from basics like NCERTS to published books and printed material. Each book will have around 300 to 500 pages. Let's take 400 pages on average.

Now, for me, I would finish about 10 pages in an hour during the first reading. In some subjects, it would be 5 to 6 pages, for about 13 to 15 pages, but for the sake of calculation, let's do it 10. If I studied 10 hours every day (which in itself is a big challenge) without even a just rest, it would take me 200 days to finish all those books. It is approximately 7 months of 10-hour study days with 0 holidays. Can you imagine doing that?

Now after all this, I just talked about the General Studies part, which is about 60% of all the preparation. Other than that, we have 2 articles in an optional subject (a mountain in itself with at least 10 PG level subject books), essay, English language, Telugu language, CSAT, and most important of all, current affairs. Current Affairs includes daily newspaper, daily news, monthly magazines, annual compilations, economic study, budget, India yearbook, etc.

Now, you have finished all this. Very well. But you only did one reading. After a few weeks you would forget the small details of what you read. Therefore, you should reread and review them over and over again.

After all this, you need to practice. Practice mock tests for preliminaries in GS and CSAT, practice writing responses for hours on end (which is another great challenge), and practice for the interview.

The Civil Service is carried out in three stages: preliminary, network and interview over a period of 1 year. If you do not qualify at any stage, you will restart another year from Prelims.

Throughout this process you need to be mentally stable, we are talking about an ideal situation with 10-12 hours of study and minimum breaks of more than a year just for preparation and then the exam cycle itself takes another full year. The mental aspect of this is really very important. So in general, if you are very lucky, you can finish it in 2-3 years. We all know how rare luck is.

Oh, I forgot the reservations, my fault. It's a government review so we have reservations on All India Rankings and reservations on where it can be posted. Later you will also have reservations in promotions. 😉

There is a colloquial saying, "UPSC can ask for anything under the sun."

Let's see if this is true by looking at what themes we read for Civils.

CSAT:

  1. English
  2. Quantitative suitability
  3. Logical reasoning and data interpretation

ELECTRICAL NETWORK:

4. Telugu language (your local language)

Test:

5. Social problems

6. Philosophical questions

GS 1:

7. History of India (ancient, medieval and modern)

8. World history

9. Indian art and culture

10. Indian Society

11. Geography

GS 2:

12. Government

13. Governance and social justice

14. International relations

GS 3:

15. Economy

16. Ecology and environment

17. Disaster management

18. Science and technology

19. Internal security

GS 4:

20. Ethics and human values

21. Moral thinkers and philosophers

Optional:

22. Sociology (PG level subject of your choice)

I do not include current affairs and general knowledge here.

Look, I didn't write this to scare people. I am a serious civilian aspirant. It has been for a couple of years. I am confident in my preparation and look forward to doing it this year. It is possible to clean civils. It is one of the most prestigious jobs in the country. Here is a purpose. You will be edifying for societies and you will bring tangible changes in people's lives. I encourage all of you to participate in this service. I just want you to know the facts before you go in. Join me and thousands of other applicants on this fun journey.

Preparation is a long process and you will surely have some distractions or others in this period.

I had them too and I won't say that I was able to resist them every time. But whenever I was able to do it it was as follows:

  • My experience helped me. I spent 4 years in the town and thus, every time I was wasting my time, those memories to which I aspired when I lived in the town with few aminities came to mind. That is why I always advise people to visit a town for a few days.
  • Gandhi's life helped me. Always keep your talisman in mind. Whenever in doubt, think from the Gandhi mindset. That old per
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Preparation is a long process and you will surely have some distractions or others in this period.

I had them too and I won't say that I was able to resist them every time. But whenever I was able to do it it was as follows:

  • My experience helped me. I spent 4 years in the town and thus, every time I was wasting my time, those memories to which I aspired when I lived in the town with few aminities came to mind. That is why I always advise people to visit a town for a few days.
  • Gandhi's life helped me. Always keep your talisman in mind. Whenever in doubt, think from the Gandhi mindset. That old man made the most of his time and here we young people waste energy. It always motivated me. Even sometimes, I would wake up from the dream and start studying.
  • The philosophical aspects of life. While it took the pressure off the exam at the same time, it made me realize that a moment with yourself is priceless. The temptations vanished at once.
  • I rarely moved to explore Delhi. When you see more people, you are more tempted to do what they are doing. He rarely visited the Nagar Rajender, although he lived in close proximity to him. But even if the temptations became extreme at times, he preferred to go see a good movie or eat somewhere or visit some historical place (it happened very rarely in a year).
  • Give your temptations a better look. For example, if I had to listen to music, I would try different tastes (indirectly helping in art and culture). This was the moment when I began to greatly admire Nusrat fateh ali khan sahab. As if I had to watch a video, I watched documentaries or 'friends' to lighten the mood.
  • I spoke less to people. Or to put it better, I spoke only to those who really care about you. In this way, less flow of trivial information, fewer distractions.
  • I made a wish list. Put all the temptations on that list and remind me to delete the exam soon and then enjoy those temptations.

I guess this is pretty much what I did as far as I can remember. Perhaps some of the practices could help you.

Most candidates have this question in mind about when to begin civil service exam preparation. In your case, you are 26 years old and a good age to start preparing. Don't think of just pulling on your socks and starting your prep.

● You are mature enough to understand the seriousness of the preparation. You are ready to launch into your preparation and this age is optimal to start. Now is not the time to ask when, where, and why.

● All you need is a genuine START. Then accelerate. Know your speed. Keep up the momentum. Always keep in mind that the hours you lose today will cost you tomorrow. OR

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Most candidates have this question in mind about when to begin civil service exam preparation. In your case, you are 26 years old and a good age to start preparing. Don't think of just pulling on your socks and starting your prep.

● You are mature enough to understand the seriousness of the preparation. You are ready to launch into your preparation and this age is optimal to start. Now is not the time to ask when, where, and why.

● All you need is a genuine START. Then accelerate. Know your speed. Keep up the momentum. Always keep in mind that the hours you lose today will cost you tomorrow. Once you realize that you are wasting your time for no reason, you will begin to focus on your goal. Realize now.

● Some applicants assume that they can take the exam next year if they prepare very well this year. This feeling grows stronger as the preliminaries approach. This is one of the reasons why only less than 50 percent of applicants write the preliminary exam each year.

Experts believe that aggressive preparation for 10 to 12 months is essential. Four out of 10 Indians (21-32 years old) aspire to become IAS officers and the competition is so intense that only 5 percent of that massive number make it. An applicant must map out an effective strategy and decide the ideal number of hours required to implement that strategy.

An applicant must also understand that preparation for the civil service exam requires qualitative rather than quantitative preparation. It's about completing your short-term goal. Ideally, you should focus on two topics every day. Most of the top ranked have started preparing for the exams since their school days, as most questions are mainly asked from the standard Class 6 to 12 books. Therefore, it is believed that it is sufficient to prepare notes and dedicate 10 to 12 hours before a year of examination.

Find out what you are good at and what you would need help with. Do it for all topics and work on them.

I think it will take a month at most. The result is likely to be declared before November 1.

Now, what should be the way forward for both types of applicants? 1. Many of those who are likely to fail, and 2. Few will qualify for the network.

  1. Failing is the next setup for success, forget about failure and embrace it for the next try. rethink your strategy. Find your weak areas and lastly, practice, practice, and practice.

I used to follow the guidance of Dr. Khan (KSG-IAS). He is a person who will instill positivity in the mind of the aspirant. There may be the possibility that the applicant is weak in a particular section….

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I think it will take a month at most. The result is likely to be declared before November 1.

Now, what should be the way forward for both types of applicants? 1. Many of those who are likely to fail, and 2. Few will qualify for the network.

  1. Failing is the next setup for success, forget about failure and embrace it for the next try. rethink your strategy. Find your weak areas and lastly, practice, practice, and practice.

I used to follow the guidance of Dr. Khan (KSG-IAS). He is a person who will instill positivity in the mind of the aspirant. There may be a possibility that the applicant is weak in a particular section ... and for that I would suggest following the KSG 10000+ question booklet which is like diagnosing a section of the syllabus ... in which you will find The topic-wise questions section based on the syllabus micro-classification. That can help you get past a particular topic or subtopic. Also, KSG's preliminary test series is more than worth it ... Actually, one of my superiors (which is the IRS, now) has quoted these lines.

2. Success is not yet assured, those who have passed the preliminaries. a difficult road ahead ... .. And for more and more question practice, I would suggest to follow KSG's main test series. In which you can find many of the questions similar to those that have been asked in the UPSC network paper. I think joining Destinaire from KSG mains would definitely help the hopeful outgrow Mains.

KSG has changed the destiny of many …… You could be the next ………!

For me it was a three-stage feeling:

Step 1: I rejoice at becoming something I have admired since childhood.

Step 2: Satisfaction for clearing such a long process and thank the Almighty

Step 3: Feeling responsible, I scrutinized and criticized government policies during preparation, but now you are on the other side of the spectrum. The dignity of service rests on your shoulder and you can no longer be a reckless college student.

For me, this transition happened in a span of half an hour or so. I am not the type of person who would start jumping or start giving motivational talks and blogging. I knew th

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For me it was a three-stage feeling:

Step 1: I rejoice at becoming something I have admired since childhood.

Step 2: Satisfaction for clearing such a long process and thank the Almighty

Step 3: Feeling responsible, I scrutinized and criticized government policies during preparation, but now you are on the other side of the spectrum. The dignity of service rests on your shoulder and you can no longer be a reckless college student.

For me, this transition happened in a span of half an hour or so. I am not the type of person who would start jumping or start giving motivational talks and blogging. I knew that my responsibilities had begun.

But with that said, I have practiced many adventure sports, but nothing compares to the feeling of looking for your name on that coveted list and leaving it free to my choice. It is a feeling like no other. :)

PS: Given the randomness of the exam, I don't see that passing CSE is a win or a win. I see it as an opportunity that I have been given to implement to a certain level what I believe in and serve my country within the framework of the law and the constitution.

Until I landed in Delhi in 2014 after my graduation, there was no one there to guide me regarding the choice of elective.

Now that there is only one year left to try (I have it in 2015), I had to decide very quickly.

I was sure that I would not go for the subject of my experience, that is, Engineering.

Now, all other topics have their pros and cons. You like some themes of all themes and you don't like the others. So, it was difficult to decide.

Some senior colleagues in Delhi guided me regarding each topic and I preselected the topics of Geography, Hindi, History, Anthropology, Political Science, Phi.

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Until I landed in Delhi in 2014 after my graduation, there was no one there to guide me regarding the choice of elective.

Now that there is only one year left to try (I have it in 2015), I had to decide very quickly.

I was sure that I would not go for the subject of my experience, that is, Engineering.

Now, all other topics have their pros and cons. You like some themes of all themes and you don't like the others. So, it was difficult to decide.

Some senior colleagues in Delhi guided me regarding each topic and I shortlisted the topics of Geography, Hindi, History, Anthropology, Political Science, Philosophy (which doesn't sound like a short list at all).

Hindi removed because there were too few colleagues to prepare with. Philosophy because it is very deep and requires too much thinking. Geography and anthropology because it has a good part of science and technology involved.

At this point, I realized one thing, that is, it is not always about the options you choose, but also how you work with those options. So, I thought we are going to go for anything outside of political science and history and even if it is, I will work hard to navigate through it.

I have never read history in such depth before. But I took it by chance. I worked hard. Read only the history for a full 4 months. And thankfully, it scored 260 (the second highest of that year) in the main courses.

Iqbal dhaliwal

Iqbal Dhaliwal was ranked first in the UPSC exam in 1996. He worked until 2002 as Assistant Collector and Assistant Secretary. He left because I suppose he was interested in economics; Shortly before leaving his post as an IAS officer, he did his Master of Public Affairs at Princeton University. Upon leaving his service, he went on to work as Director of Economic Analysis in a consulting group.

In 2009, he started working at J-PAL (Abdul Lateef Jamal Poverty Action Lab) based at MIT. He is currently the deputy director of the program. It is a network of six acros offices

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Iqbal dhaliwal

Iqbal Dhaliwal was ranked first in the UPSC exam in 1996. He worked until 2002 as Assistant Collector and Assistant Secretary. He left because I suppose he was interested in economics; Shortly before leaving his post as an IAS officer, he did his Master of Public Affairs at Princeton University. Upon leaving his service, he went on to work as Director of Economic Analysis in a consulting group.

In 2009, he started working at J-PAL (Abdul Lateef Jamal Poverty Action Lab) based at MIT. He is currently the deputy director of the program. It is a network of six offices around the world that aims to reduce poverty and accelerate development.

He is married to Gita Gopinath, a senior lecturer at Harvard University. They live happily in Cambridge with their son.

More than 1.2 million people take the Upsc exam in hopes of becoming IAS OFFICERS and serving society.

Form filled out by 1.2 million people or more.

Preliminaries: 4-5 lakhs only give a preliminary exam and in which 80% of people have taken the exam for granted.

Network: less than 1 lakh of people are finally serious applicants. In which only 20k to 50k survive until the network.

INTERVIEW - ONLY 1000-2000 people stay for the interview.

Result: only 100 or fewer become IAS officers and the remainder get a different position.

Result: In the race to win, where more than 1.2 million people apply, only 100 get the desired result.

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More than 1.2 million people take the Upsc exam in hopes of becoming IAS OFFICERS and serving society.

Form filled out by 1.2 million people or more.

Preliminaries: 4-5 lakhs only give a preliminary exam and in which 80% of people have taken the exam for granted.

Network: less than 1 lakh of people are finally serious applicants. In which only 20k to 50k survive until the network.

INTERVIEW - ONLY 1000-2000 people stay for the interview.

Result: only 100 or fewer become IAS officers and the remainder get a different position.

Result: In the race for victory, where more than 1.2 million people apply, only 100 get the desired result.

These 100 people are those people who held steady throughout the year in hopes of securing a spot in the elite officers' club.

1 million = 10 lakhs

1.2 million = 12 lakhs

1 k = 1000

10k = 10,000

Frankly, I'm telling you not to ask these kinds of questions.

First look for the questions in the search option.

Do not be angry.

When you ask a question on Quora, it is broadcast to everyone who is experts or experienced in this field.

I hope you don't scold me.

Thanks.

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