How much are UN volunteers paid?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Brenden Farley



How much are UN volunteers paid?

United Nations Volunteers receive compensation of $ 1,500 per month, plus a “duty station adjustment multiplier” (PAM) specific to their duty station corresponding to the relative cost of living. There are additional allowances if eligible family members live with you in the position. I think they could have removed any additional compensation for distressed duty stations when UNV revised its international terms of service in 2015: United Nations Volunteers

It depends on the country of service. It is more or less the same as a local government worker in that country would get. It's called a "stipend," but it is more than enough for your shelter, food, and so on.

I would just add to the answers above that volunteers are covered by UN health and life insurance. In the event of death in service, beneficiaries receive a balloon payment although I do not know exactly how that payment is calculated.

Generally, we are not paid or demanded anything. We extend a helping hand of goodwill with a view to giving back to society.

The UN reimburses you for your monthly 'allowances' and not your salary. It also depends on the location where you are working. I think they also cover your medical insurance during your stay

When it comes to the UNV online volunteer service, no stipend is awarded.

A job at the UN is essentially a government job and most of the pros and cons are very similar.

Pro:

  1. Ability to work with international people
    People who work at the UN generally reflect the demographics of their member countries quite accurately if the UN is viewed as a complete organization.
    If you work in a country office or regional office, your coworkers will reflect much more closely the demographics of the area you are in, with fewer international people there. But even an office in the country will always have some foreigners. Only New York, Vienna, Geneva and Nairobi are very international.
  2. Wo
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A job at the UN is essentially a government job and most of the pros and cons are very similar.

Pro:

  1. Ability to work with international people
    People who work at the UN generally reflect the demographics of their member countries quite accurately if the UN is viewed as a complete organization.
    If you work in a country office or regional office, your coworkers will reflect much more closely the demographics of the area you are in, with fewer international people there. But even an office in the country will always have some foreigners. Only New York, Vienna, Geneva and Nairobi are very international.
  2. Working with experts
    Most people at the United Nations should have a good level of experience in one area or another. Therefore, you usually work with professionals who are also experienced. A great place to learn.
  3. Salary
    Salary can be, and usually is, quite good if you come from a developing country. If you come from a developed nation (Australia, New Zealand, Japan, South Korea, EU / Europe, North America,…) the salaries are not attractive. While they are not horrible, money would never be a reason to choose a job at the UN. Contractor positions can pay well as they are adjusted to market rates at the place where the work is performed, but technically you are not a UN employee / staff member at the time.
    In Vienna and New York, private sector wages for similar jobs would pay 50% more.
  4. Relaxed workplace
    The pace of work is generally not high. There is no profit pressure, which is good for many people. However, some people need this and the UN is not ideal for you.
    In general, your job is very 9 to 5, unless you choose not to.
  5. Benefits
    Being a member of the UN staff has benefits, for example:
    1. quite good private health insurance plan (useful even in the EU, where centralized public health is good),
    2. depending on its function, tax relief,
    3. tax exempt vehicles (not a very big issue in the US, but a huge benefit in the EU / Europe, Australia, etc. as it can reduce your purchase by 40% to 50%, even 80% in Singapore)
    4. UNFCU banking offers a few distinct benefits and you can retain this benefit FOR LIFE, even if you leave the UN.
    5. CCPPNU - pension fund. Like banking, you can hold this for life, if you wish ... albeit with some limitations after leaving the UN (especially if you paid for only a few years)
  6. Networking
    The UN may not be your ultimate career goal, but by joining as a younger person (under 30) you can build a large network of contacts that will invariably end up spreading across the globe as the years go by. . This can be extremely useful one day if you want to start your own business, grow an existing business.
    But it's also great for friends all over the place.
  7. People
    Like any organization that is huge, not all people will be your friends or even necessarily like you. But the UN has a good chunk of people with a common set of values ​​and if you share those values ​​then it's a good group of people to work with. The people there mostly understand that they are working to make sure the world is not shattered in a deranged war. And you know it every day.

Swindle:

  1. Bureaucracy
    The UN is extremely burdened with red tape and red tape. Something is necessary, but there is too much. Many people think so. It raises costs and, in recent decades, has essentially caused many developed nations to drastically reduce the amount of funds they invest in the UN.
  2. Corruption
    Corruption is definitely a problem. I won't say much more than this because my previous role allowed me some unique insights on this, but suffice it to say that the combination of this and the bureaucracy has greatly damaged the reputation of the UN with many wealthy nations ... particularly those nations that They have gone to great lengths to implement their own anti-corruption programs.
  3. Hierarchy
    The UN has a military-style classification system, but no promotion system. You cannot rise through the ranks like you can in almost any other organization. There is a process, but it is cumbersome, riddled with bizarre procedures and a series of promotions that make perfect logical sense and that, in fact, would benefit the interests of the UN, actually become almost impossible.

I have not listed things like dangerous countries, travel, responsibilities, or work for a respected organization because I believe that all of those points are true and false, depending on a number of factors.

In my opinion and in my experience, the UN does not send many people to dangerous countries and those that do are signing up and they know (hopefully) exactly what they are getting into.
Peacekeepers are NOT UN employees, they are enlisted soldiers in the service of the armed forces of the nation to which they belong. And a soldier probably knows that work can get him killed.

Travel is not an issue either. Most roles don't see you traveling. Maybe you would go to New York. Only a few specific roles see you travel, for example if you work with projects. For example, UNIDO, UNODC, etc. They have projects running in various countries and regions and if you are a project coordinator or your project has annual meetings where everyone gets together then there may be trips. This is like any large organization, be it government or private. Most of all, you sit in the same office every day and do your thing.

Responsibility ... most UN jobs are very strictly defined and you do exactly that and ONLY that. Responsibility really only exists in the upper ranks. Which is, in a way, part of the appeal if you like a life without a lot of stress and pressure. It's really no different than working anywhere else when it comes to liability.

Working for a respected organization. That is largely a matter of opinion and depends on where you are.

As I work within the UN system, I prefer to remain anonymous.

There are two types of staff in my UN agency: general service staff (“G staff”) and professional staff (“P staff”). The first step will be to decide what kind of staff you want to be.

G's staff are basically the people who keep the system running, usually secretaries, technicians, handymen, but also warehouse packers, cooks, etc. They are only hired locally at the destination.

Some examples (not exhaustive):

A typical secretary would be a G-4. These days, they are known as "team assistants", covering a wide

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As I work within the UN system, I prefer to remain anonymous.

There are two types of staff in my UN agency: general service staff (“G staff”) and professional staff (“P staff”). The first step will be to decide what kind of staff you want to be.

G's staff are basically the people who keep the system running, usually secretaries, technicians, handymen, but also warehouse packers, cooks, etc. They are only hired locally at the destination.

Some examples (not exhaustive):

A typical secretary would be a G-4. These days, they are known as "team assistants", covering a wide range of administrative tasks, including travel arrangements, filing, organizing workshops, and so on. In more technical areas, a lab technician or electrician would also be around G-3 or G -4. With experience, they can become G-5.

A G-5 is usually an assistant director rather than a section chief (the director is usually the chief of 3-5 section chiefs within a division), or their job is somewhat more specific and / or technical. A G-6 will be a highly experienced technician or administrative assistant who will take care of important division matters such as hiring, budgeting and finances, resource planning, etc.

At the low end, a G-1 would be, for example, a warehouse packer, a G-2 would be a lab assistant (mainly cleaning the lab), and a G-3 would be a cook, mail messenger, junior lab technician. and often a ticket. grade for newcomers placed in G-4 jobs.

The other category is the P staff:

Most of the time they will be senior scientists or technicians, engineers, translators or senior managers of entities that involve hundreds of people. P staff are hired from around the world and are paid much more than G staff; however, their tenure in the UN agency is generally limited to several years (with exceptions). Almost all managers are at the P-4 or P-5 level, division directors D-1 or D-2. "D staff" is rarely used, directors "count as P staff".

Young graduates with the proper scientific training often start out as P-1 (really fresh out of school, no experience). P-2 is, for example, a junior scientist with some experience, and P-3 a fairly broad category of established personnel with usual experience. Senior scientists are typically P-4, equivalent to junior managers (eg, Team Leaders).

So from the above your first question is: G or P? Personally, I am fortunate to live in a city with a UN agency and be employed there as G staff, which already pays very well.

Yes. The pay is good. That is one of the reasons why it is not easy to enter the United Nations system. Many people want to enter. And the vacancies are almost always distributed among the people who are already there.

Now you understand why I was anonymous. It is almost impossible to get in without a "door opener", either G or P level. Recruitment processes between staff categories differ considerably, and since I am a general service staff member, my additional lines will be more from the perspective of category G staff.

In my case, it was an old friend of my dad's within the system who told me exactly what to write on the online personal history form (UN slang for CV), how to write it, and where exactly to send it (yes, at that time still I sent it by post!). He or she told me what to wear, what questions to expect, etc. With the help of this person (and he / she "supporting" me internally), I was able to secure a short-term G-3 contract for three months. A humble assistant secretary job with a lot of photocopying and really quite mundane administrative tasks. But he paid me over $ 2,000 p / m - NET! (2005)

I continued for almost five years with short-term contracts. I was never "too good" at photocopying thick documents or packing boxes if office needs called for it. You must show will and dedication, and endure fear about the next extension of your contract, possibly for years. You also learn a lot of cool things, you learn what is needed here, and you can apply that knowledge. In general, you have to be willing to eat a humble cake, which does not mean that you allow people to screw you. But don't consider any mundane tasks "under you" at first.

You should also prepare to change jobs frequently initially. In the beginning, I was always the stand-in for this maternity leave secretary, that sick lady, this guy on a career development reassignment. That's great. You quickly learn a lot of different things.

But once you've managed to get into the system and prove yourself for a while, the most important step is to land a fixed-term contract. The hiring process for short-term contracts is comparatively unbureaucratic, designed to quickly obtain replacements for staff on sick leave / other assignments / retired, etc.

However, for a fixed period, you must formally apply for the job officially advertised on the UN agency website. You will compete against dozens of insiders and hundreds of outsiders (whose chances are negligible). You must "fear" more internal competitors ...

Often times, you will have done a great job on your temporary post, but now the time has come for it to be officially announced. Maybe the guy he's been replacing (because he himself was temporary at a higher grade level) now got the "highest job for real", and now he can do the same. Apply for your own job! To really get it.

You'll be faced with the fact that other 360s want that job too. But since you've already kept the hot chair on the desk for a while, your chances of getting it are very, very high if you've done a good job. However, they are never 100%.

And you will face a wait.

Getting a fixed term as a general service staff (less professional) rewards you with a very strong contract and very high job security. But between clicking the submit button and actually being interviewed (either for the job you're already sitting in, or another, if you're invited for an interview) three months can easily go by. When you walk out of the interview feeling pretty confident, you still need to prepare to wait two and a half to four months for that precious email informing you that you got the job. Seriously. Be patient.

You may also know in advance that your current job has a timestamp (maternity leave, she will come back), so you will apply for many jobs in addition to your current one, the ones that have already been advertised in the system. Be prepared to submit about 25 job applications and attend 7 interviews before you get the "Yes, baby!" Message. (my experience)

Wow ... not sure how focused this article was ... I am writing it today because I was privileged to be recently promoted to a higher G staff level. And I have a secure long-term contract. It has been a great battle within the UN system to get to where I am now. And I can still go further, but I'll let it rest for a while.

Good luck applicants! Maybe my information above will give you some useful ideas ...

You must register with the United Nations volunteer program through https://www.unv.org/.

Some things it shows you know about this program:

  1. These are not "paid" volunteer positions, however the UN provides accommodation, living expenses and a stipend that compares favorably with some paid positions within the international development industry.
  2. Given this, the program has an extensive application process and is highly competitive. Often, you must demonstrate relevant qualifications and experience to be considered.
  3. You cannot select to volunteer in a specific country. The process is: first,
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You must register with the United Nations volunteer program through https://www.unv.org/.

Some things it shows you know about this program:

  1. These are not "paid" volunteer positions, however the UN provides accommodation, living expenses and a stipend that compares favorably with some paid positions within the international development industry.
  2. Given this, the program has an extensive application process and is highly competitive. Often, you must demonstrate relevant qualifications and experience to be considered.
  3. You cannot select to volunteer in a specific country. The process is: first, you sign up for the program and create a profile. You may then be invited to apply for specific volunteer positions based on your skills and experience. You will then need to complete a specific application for that position and depending on your application, you may be offered the position. Therefore, it is unlikely that you will be able to choose a specific country where you want to volunteer.

I was once a national UN Volunteer in Uganda. UN volunteers online do not receive any stipend. My fiancee offered her web design skills to a local Jamaican NGO as a UN Online volunteer. Typically, after your service is completed, the partner agency may recommend that UNV provide you with a certificate of service.

The national and international United Nations Volunteers program is a different arrangement. You are entitled to monthly voluntary benefits.

However, regardless of the UN Volunteers arrangement, the experience can be extremely valuable if you intend to work with the UN for the long term. The first thi

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I was once a national UN Volunteer in Uganda. UN volunteers online do not receive any stipend. My fiancee offered her web design skills to a local Jamaican NGO as a UN Online volunteer. Typically, after your service is completed, the partner agency may recommend that UNV provide you with a certificate of service.

The national and international United Nations Volunteers program is a different arrangement. You are entitled to monthly voluntary benefits.

However, regardless of the UN Volunteers arrangement, the experience can be extremely valuable if you intend to work with the UN for the long term. The first thing you will notice is that you will suddenly have more interview opportunities for UN and other NGO related jobs. That is if you can adequately communicate your experience with UNV.

As a UN Volunteer, you have the responsibility and you can make a difference. Having been associated on a project with UNDP, I am able to bring the small NGO in a remote area of ​​the world with the language barrier to global recognition through my organization. Sometimes it is difficult to understand the language and the problem itself is having a different professional training. With the help of experts, tutorials, and examples above, it is possible to move forward. They also invite you to local UN events, staying in Dallas, I was invited to the United Nations Foundation event and moderated by Model UN. The best part is working as a team.

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As a UN Volunteer, you have the responsibility and you can make a difference. Having been associated in a project with UNDP, I am able to bring the small NGO in a remote area of ​​the world with the language barrier to worldwide recognition through my organization. Sometimes it is difficult to understand the language and the problem itself is having a different professional training. With the help of experts, tutorials, and examples above, it is possible to move forward. They also invite you to local UN events, staying in Dallas, I was invited to the United Nations Foundation event and moderated by Model UN. The best part is working with teams from all over the world and not limited to locals. I feel responsible for the countries of my stakeholders and for social protection issues related to that area.

First of all, I am a UN retiree having been an employee of the UN and other international organizations for over fifteen years as a professional in social development affairs. I can only refer to my experience and what I have seen during the performance of my job. Maybe. A specialized employee of the UN agency or department issuing these documents can expand on these comments.

You can only obtain a UN passport if you are a formal employee hired by the organization and / or are on a mission in a foreign country where this identification is needed to fulfill your duties. Often

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First of all, I am a UN retiree having been an employee of the UN and other international organizations for over fifteen years as a professional in social development affairs. I can only refer to my experience and what I have seen during the performance of my job. Maybe. A specialized employee of the UN agency or department issuing these documents can expand on these comments.

You can only obtain a UN passport if you are a formal employee hired by the organization and / or are on a mission in a foreign country where this identification is needed to fulfill your duties. Often times, the latter also depends on how long the job will last. Also, if you are a close relative of a UN staff member, the UN office in charge may request a passport from you and issue the document. Generally, the latter covers close relatives such as wife and children or other special situations when this relative belongs to the immediate family and / or lives with them in the same residence.

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