How many new people have insurance because of ACA?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Corey Jackson



How many new people have insurance because of ACA?

I think the real number is about 2 million. I remember all the news when the ACA went online that about 12 million signed up, but about 10 million of them had previously had insurance that was suspended due to the ACA.

All the people added to Medicaid don't really have anything to do with the ACA. Medicaid could have expanded just as easily without the enactment of the ACA.

The last I heard was that 12 million were insured by the ACA. On the other hand, 20 million lost their insurance when ti was instituted.

Well my wife and I did.

Before the ACA, most people had health insurance through work or did not have health insurance. As early as the 1980s, employers subsidized health insurance and covered costs enough that people stopped worrying about $ 100 medical appointments - they only had to pay $ 5 or $ 10.

People who bought individual health insurance were rare. People who did not have insurance through work paid for what they needed, when they had to. those who couldn't pay went to emergency rooms.

As America's population aged, health care, and therefore health insurance, became more expensive. Health insurance c

Keep reading

Before the ACA, most people had health insurance through work or did not have health insurance. As early as the 1980s, employers subsidized health insurance and covered costs enough that people stopped worrying about $ 100 medical appointments - they only had to pay $ 5 or $ 10.

People who bought individual health insurance were rare. People who did not have insurance through work paid for what they needed, when they had to. those who couldn't pay went to emergency rooms.

As America's population aged, health care, and therefore health insurance, became more expensive. Health insurance costs for businesses began to rise faster than business revenues. All CEOs could draw straight lines and see when profits dropped to zero.

The companies began to reduce their subsidies. Insurance premiums, copays, and deductibles paid by employees rose rapidly, especially after 2000. Long-standing companies with older workforces began to tell their employees, “We are at a competitive disadvantage in compared to European and Asian competitors whose employee health insurance is provided by their governments. Our best hope for survival is national health insurance. ”I heard this message from the Xerox vice president for profit around 2006 or 2007.

Health insurance went from being a problem for the poor to a problem for the middle class. That is why the ACA was approved. But enough people still had insurance from profitable companies that health insurance is not a crisis for the entire middle class. This is why the ACA was so limited.

America is still getting old. The profits of large companies continue to grow more slowly than healthcare costs. Which do you think is more likely, Trumpcare or “Medicare for all”?

This is one of those questions that you will never get a direct answer to. Like science, statistics can always be trusted, but statisticians (or scientists) often cannot be trusted. Analysis is easy to unintentionally screw up and even easier to intentionally skew. The same goes for the data collection process. Supporters of the ACA will say "zero" while the most extreme detractors will say more than 90 million. The first is completely wrong. There are no figures to support this claim. It is based on unicorns and fairy dust. The latter is only partially correct. 68% of those already insured

Keep reading

This is one of those questions that you will never get a direct answer to. Like science, statistics can always be trusted, but statisticians (or scientists) often cannot be trusted. Analysis is easy to unintentionally screw up and even easier to intentionally skew. The same goes for the data collection process. Supporters of the ACA will say "zero" while the most extreme detractors will say more than 90 million. The first is completely wrong. There are no figures to support this claim. It is based on unicorns and fairy dust. The latter is only partially correct. 68% of those who were already insured found that their plans were no longer legally allowed and had to switch to more expensive plans. "If you like your insurance, expanding their ability to subsidize these more expensive plans… and they also had to increase both income tax and sales tax to offset. Others did not and offered hardly any grants. Then there is the fact that in places like Virginia, there is only one health insurance provider still in business. You pay what they charge and you have no alternative. expanding their ability to subsidize these more expensive plans… and they also had to increase both income tax and sales tax to offset. Others did not and offered hardly any grants. Then there is the fact that in places like Virginia, there is only one health insurance provider still in business. You pay what they charge and you have no alternative.

When it comes to the numbers, I can only give you my own anecdotal personal experience. When I was a full-time student before the ACA, I had a plan that had no limits and a $ 2,000 deductible for $ 50 a month. Before meeting my deductible, the plan paid 20% and then 100%. It also covered wellness visits and checkups in full. I kept a health savings account that had the $ 2k in it, so if something catastrophic happened, that was fine. It was a great plan for me.

When the ACA was approved, I qualified for AHCCS and didn't pay a penny because I was in school and not making a lot of money. When I graduated, everything changed. I found that the price of my plan had more than tripled because now it had to cover all kinds of things that didn't apply to me, like maternity care and birth control (I'm a man). Of course, this was WITH subsidies to my income level. I couldn't afford that with my shitty little apartment rent, utilities, car payment (I don't exactly drive a Benz or BMW either), and student loan payments after the income tax hike that came with it. Program. After a lifetime of making health insurance maintenance a high priority, I could no longer afford to have it and still have food on the table. I'm also not one of those organic food freaks. I buy what

I am not the only one on this ship. I have friends to whom this also happened. I know quite a few whose jobs cut all employees from full time to part time and lost their employer covered plans because it was too expensive. That really sucked because it was both a loss of insurance and a reduction in pay.

I know this was not what you were looking for. You wanted concrete numbers. In reality, hard numbers do not exist.

The health insurance policy offered through the ACA in our area costs more money than most people make.

Therefore, only the very poor, who qualify for Medicaid, and the wealthy, who likely have coverage through other means, can afford an ACA policy.

I'll give you an example of a friend that I was trying to help. He is a single man who earns around $ 1,450 per month after taxes. His ACA policy also had a premium of $ 1,450 per month, so I guess that was technically equal to what he earned. Due to her low income, she qualified for a subsidy. However, the subsidy was only $ 300 per month. That means you earn $ 1450 for

Keep reading

The health insurance policy offered through the ACA in our area costs more money than most people make.

Therefore, only the very poor, who qualify for Medicaid, and the wealthy, who likely have coverage through other means, can afford an ACA policy.

I'll give you an example of a friend that I was trying to help. He is a single man who earns around $ 1,450 per month after taxes. His ACA policy also had a premium of $ 1,450 per month, so I guess that was technically equal to what he earned. Due to her low income, she qualified for a subsidy. However, the subsidy was only $ 300 per month. That means you make $ 1,450 per month and you would pay $ 1,150 per month for your insurance premium. That would give you $ 300 per month left over for all other living expenses. Needless to say, you paid the fine and have no insurance.

I plan to check again when open enrollment begins on November 1st. However, when I last checked, the insurance premium was $ 1850 per month and the total out-of-pocket cost (copays and deductibles) was predicted to be $ 2900 per month, which is more than I expected to go. to home.

To give you an idea of ​​the change, before ACA, my friend's premium was $ 350 per month with a private insurance provider that offered better coverage than the ACA plan. I couldn't get a policy like that because I have pre-existing conditions. What I was able to get was a high deductible policy that costs $ 100 per month in premium and was expected to pay around $ 1000 per month in total out-of-pocket costs. Both my friend's plan and mine were about 1/3 the cost of ACA policies.

So basically the ACA costs 3 times more than previous insurance policies with less coverage in many cases. It's not that we can't get an ACA policy, we just can't afford it.

My wife and I previously had a regular private insurance plan for her and the children. It was decent insurance with a manageable deductible of, if I remember correctly, $ 324 per month. I think we had to give up maternity coverage to get that price.

Then he got a job with a group plan and worked there for a couple of years, so we abandoned the private plan.

Two or three years later, he was considering changing jobs, but the new job had no group health insurance. "No problem," we thought. We know what we were paying for private insurance just a couple of years ago, and this new "Obamacare" thing is s

Keep reading

My wife and I previously had a regular private insurance plan for her and the children. It was decent insurance with a manageable deductible of, if I remember correctly, $ 324 per month. I think we had to give up maternity coverage to get that price.

Then he got a job with a group plan and worked there for a couple of years, so we abandoned the private plan.

Two or three years later, he was considering changing jobs, but the new job had no group health insurance. "No problem," we thought. We know what we were paying for private insurance just a couple of years ago, and this new "Obamacare" is supposed to be even cheaper and better. We will simply calculate the price of a plan in this new Internet marketplace and quote it with the new job.

Oh boy, we were in for a surprise. The plans cost at least double what they had with our old private plan, and the deductibles were just outrageous.

Look, I can understand the pain of going bankrupt due to a large medical bill when you don't have health insurance. The thing is, even the ACA plans, which were twice as expensive as our old private plan, had deductibles so high that we'd be bankrupt just trying to pay for them. The plan was twice as expensive and the deductible was so high that we would probably never reach it. Of course, there were lower deductibles available, but the premiums became completely unmanageable.

My wife decided to stay at her old job, with the group plan, because the ACA made health insurance so expensive that she couldn't afford the new job.

It depends on your definition of "lost". The ACA "Obamacare" did several things:

  1. It provided a standardized set of benefits that all insurers were required to provide. These included birth control and no limits on benefits per year or per lifetime. If your pre-ACA policy was non-compliant and these things were added, they increased the cost. If you couldn't afford the additional cost, you “lost” your insurance, even though it was available.
  2. It did not allow subscription based on pre-existing conditions and limited subscription based on age. In short, before the ACA, young people paid much less than older people;
Keep reading

It depends on your definition of "lost". The ACA "Obamacare" did several things:

  1. It provided a standardized set of benefits that all insurers were required to provide. These included birth control and no limits on benefits per year or per lifetime. If your pre-ACA policy was non-compliant and these things were added, they increased the cost. If you couldn't afford the additional cost, you “lost” your insurance, even though it was available.
  2. It did not allow subscription based on pre-existing conditions and limited subscription based on age. In short, before the ACA, young people paid much less than older people; now only the elderly can be required to pay triple what the young pay, but they cost more than triple what the young cost. Before the ACA, if something in your medical history made the insurance company think it was going to cost you more money, they charged you more, and if you were healthy, they charged you less. In short, the ACA raised prices for the young and healthy, and if they couldn't afford these increases, they “lost” their insurance.
  3. It required many employers to provide health insurance benefits that met certain cost requirements for all full-time employees. Due to cost, some employers eliminate some low-wage jobs that previously provided some part-time insurance benefits. These people lost all the benefits they had, although they may have obtained other coverage.
  4. He foresaw the expansion of Medicaid. I doubt anyone lost insurance because of this.
  5. Provided subsidies for people in certain income groups to purchase insurance. People in those income groups benefited.

The people who “lost,” who felt they couldn't afford their health insurance, were, for the most part, healthy, middle-income, young, and middle-aged people who were earning too much from ACA subsidies and who, prior to the ACA, there were policies written with high deductibles and coverages that excluded things like mental health care, birth control or maternity. Now they have policies that cover a lot more (more things they don't use) and cost a lot more. These people can pay their routine medical bills; what they want is something to cover the important things if it happens.

If the ACA is annulled, the way forward is clear.

The United States will adopt Medicare for All within 6 years.

The Republicans (I won't say "conservatives" because that party no longer represents conservative thinking) have run a scorched earth campaign against the middle way of private insurance markets and individual mandates, so it will no longer be that way. available.

The choice will be between Medicare for all and taking away health coverage from tens of millions of Americans, and leaving tens of millions of other US workers, farmers, mothers and children behind.

Keep reading

If the ACA is annulled, the way forward is clear.

The United States will adopt Medicare for All within 6 years.

The Republicans (I won't say "conservatives" because that party no longer represents conservative thinking) have run a scorched earth campaign against the middle way of private insurance markets and individual mandates, so it will no longer be that way. available.

The choice will be between Medicare for all and taking away health coverage from tens of millions of Americans, and leaving tens of millions of other American workers, farmers, mothers and children in shitty schemes who face bankruptcy when they actually get hurt or get sick. It's a no-brainer. Republicans have been 10 years old and haven't come up with any other plans.

Businesses will breathe a sigh of relief; for the most part, they will be able to get out of the health care business. Workers will no longer be stuck in a job because they need medical attention. More people will have the freedom to become entrepreneurs, as they will not have to worry about health insurance. America will save hundreds of billions of dollars each year in wasted health care overhead.

And private health insurers will move to offer “supplemental” coverage in addition to Medicare for all for those who want expensive care beyond what the government program offers.

Insuring your family for unknown health problems is not a matter of right or left. Getting health insurance is all about affordability and protecting your family from the unknown.

In early 2019, 10.7 million people were covered through ACA exchanges. 86 percent of them qualified for grants. healthinsurance.org When people choose insurance like all products, they want what gives them the most for THEIR money. If they can get ACA coverage with a 50% subsidy, it will only cost them half the price. They will compare other options and the NET cost to them in the ACA option.

On the other side there is

Keep reading

Insuring your family for unknown health problems is not a matter of right or left. Getting health insurance is all about affordability and protecting your family from the unknown.

In early 2019, 10.7 million people were covered through ACA exchanges. 86 percent of them qualified for grants. healthinsurance.org When people choose insurance like all products, they want what gives them the most for THEIR money. If they can get ACA coverage with a 50% subsidy, it will only cost them half the price. They will compare other options and the NET cost to them in the ACA option.

On the other hand, there are many families who choose NOT to take the ACA. California offers CHIP (Children's Health Insurance Program). It can be much less expensive with more coverage than contributing to an employer family program.

As with grocery shopping, people will find the best solution for their specific circumstances.

ObamaCare vs. TrumpCare in 10 charts

1. Thanks to the ACA's new health insurance marketplaces, the expansion of Medicaid, and other provisions, the uninsured rate at all ages and income levels has dropped to the lowest level on record, bringing Americans financial and health security.

2. Before the ACA, approximately 20 percent of workers had health insurance policies that included a cap on benefits, exposing workers to the risk of devastating health care costs. The ACA prohibited these benefit limits, protecting millions of workers and their families.

3. Healthcare prices have risen at the slowest rate

Keep reading

ObamaCare vs. TrumpCare in 10 charts

1. Thanks to the ACA's new health insurance marketplaces, the expansion of Medicaid, and other provisions, the uninsured rate at all ages and income levels has dropped to the lowest level on record, bringing Americans financial and health security.

2. Before the ACA, approximately 20 percent of workers had health insurance policies that included a cap on benefits, exposing workers to the risk of devastating health care costs. The ACA prohibited these benefit limits, protecting millions of workers and their families.

3. Health care prices have risen at the slowest rate in fifty years since the ACA was enacted, and health care spending projections have dropped dramatically. The ACA included reforms to help the health care system pay for services based on quality rather than quantity.

4. Most working-age Americans get their health insurance coverage through an employer. Growth in premium costs and out-of-pocket costs for workers and their families are significantly lower since the passage of the ACA than in the previous decade.

5. Thanks to ACA tax credits rising along with premiums, 83 percent of consumers who purchase health plans through http://HeatlhCare.gov are paying $ 0 more in premiums in 2017 compared to with 2016.

Much more at the link: https://tcf.org/content/commentary/obamacare-vs-trumpcare-10-charts/

Be careful or you will get what you pay for.

You must rate the cost of insurance exchange plans based on two main criteria, the monthly premium and the patient's total out-of-pocket cost responsibility.

The lower plan, like the bronze plans, will have more restrictive networks and higher levels of authorization are needed for the care services you need. They will also commonly represent higher deductible liabilities that will increase your total costs.

Other Guides:


GET SPECIAL OFFER FROM OUR PARTNER.