How many jobs in the world generally require a high IQ? What kinds of jobs do people with high IQs do?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Josh Rogers



How many jobs in the world generally require a high IQ? What kinds of jobs do people with high IQs do?

Do you know the history of the photoelectric effect for which Einstein won the Nobel Prize in Physics? There are reactions that can never be started by red photons, no matter how many, but the same reactions can be started by a small number of blue photons. This is because blue photons have more energy and only one is needed to act as a trigger. One photon at a time, the reds don't stack.

Human thinking works like this. High IQ thoughts are blue photons. Low IQ thoughts are red photons. A small number of very important problems need high-energy thinking to solve - Think hard then

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Do you know the history of the photoelectric effect for which Einstein won the Nobel Prize in Physics? There are reactions that can never be started by red photons, no matter how many, but the same reactions can be started by a small number of blue photons. This is because blue photons have more energy and only one is needed to act as a trigger. One photon at a time, the reds don't stack.

Human thinking works like this. High IQ thoughts are blue photons. Low IQ thoughts are red photons. A small number of very important problems need high-energy thinking to solve. Think hard and then write your answer. The vast majority of everyday problems need low-energy thoughts to solve - work hard but not necessarily smart.

Certain jobs require a person to be brilliant. Physics and math are the most obvious, but almost any science qualifies. Certain jobs are so competitive that only bright people make it to those jobs. Astronaut, astronomer and regardless of his political opinion every president of any party.

In most jobs, a high IQ helps, but it is not essential.

You chose developer / programmer. High-energy thinking matters more in that field than in most other branches of IT. For example, sysadmin values ​​creativity more most of the time. Yes, a high IQ benefits developers. It is not mandatory that developers do not have a high IQ. Those with the lowest IQ have to work a LOT harder and a LOT more hours to compete.

Our world is oriented around the golden mean. Most occupations can be performed by people of average intelligence. The rare exceptions are jobs as theoretical physicists. Theoretical physics is an area in which people of average intelligence are practically lost. There are jobs that require above-average intelligence, but tend to have people of exceptional intelligence due to the competitive nature of entering the profession. Doctors are a good example of people with exceptional intelligence. An IQ of 115 is suitable for becoming a doctor, but many doctors have much higher IQ scores due to

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Our world is oriented around the golden mean. Most occupations can be performed by people of average intelligence. The rare exceptions are jobs as theoretical physicists. Theoretical physics is an area in which people of average intelligence are practically lost. There are jobs that require above-average intelligence, but tend to have people of exceptional intelligence due to the competitive nature of entering the profession. Doctors are a good example of people with exceptional intelligence. An IQ of 115 is adequate for becoming a doctor, but many doctors have much higher IQ scores due to the highly competitive nature of entering medical school. University professors,

You need a high IQ to do the professional class assignments or any leadership position. But you don't need to max out your IQ to develop those skills. Rather, you need to develop complementary skills such as social dialogue, financial management, work ethic, living healthy, and contributing to the wider society. The latter is great, but to live with people you need a broader range of skills. You need full and open communication.

A high IQ person will consider a topic from 10,000 different perspectives in 1 second and instantly select their favorite.

10,000 people with an IQ of 100 would also look at the topic from 10,000 perspectives, but combined. They would have to argue for days to select their favorite.

Your choice could be better, but it took days.

A good programmer is smart, regardless of his score on an IQ test.

My "high IQ" has never been a problem for ME in my career, but I have come across people who resented it, OR subsequently had ridiculous expectations once they realized that I did not have the level of "person average street ". intellect. But that's only for the ones who were smart enough to realize what level of IQ I possess.

The real issue, as I mentioned earlier, is the side effects and consequences of having a high IQ. But it largely depends on the industry or career a person is in.

If a janitor at the Stanford Linear Accelerator or the Massachusetts Institute of Technology h

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My "high IQ" has never been a problem for ME in my career, but I have come across people who resented it, OR subsequently had ridiculous expectations once they realized that I did not have the level of "person average street ". intellect. But that's only for the ones who were smart enough to realize what level of IQ I possess.

The real issue, as I mentioned earlier, is the side effects and consequences of having a high IQ. But it largely depends on the industry or career a person is in.

If a janitor at the Stanford Linear Accelerator or the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has a high IQ, he will probably go pretty unnoticed. But in some of the jobs I've had throughout my career, it has made me stick out "like a sore thumb" with flashing lights and clown makeup.

In my case, I have fallen into jobs and situations where my IQ was appreciated by accident rather than my design or intention. This is truly regrettable and somewhat regrettable. Although, I probably wouldn't have had the myriad of experiences that I have had if the situation had been different.

Throughout my career, I have discovered several things about myself. One of them is that I am a "stimulation junkie" and I like to be exposed and inundated with new things, ideas and challenges. And when I am not, I go to seek them even at the expense of more mundane tasks.

For example, I was the inventory manager for a small chain of fairly high-end jewelry and watch stores. A place that somehow sold over $ 100,000 items as well as lesser luxury items.

The business had been in business for enough years that a backlog of miscellaneous, but still quite valuable items had built up. Items such as original boxes for vintage Rolex watches, replacement accessories for luxury watches (tools, etc.), plus branded jewelry boxes for individual items and other similar accessories. For whatever reason, many of these items simply never accompanied the purchased item or had simply accumulated over time.

I took on the seemingly Herculean task of classifying, evaluating, and determining a resolution for each item, which resulted in a variety of results.

  • For the orphan items that should have gone with their original purchase, the owners were very grateful to be contacted and then received the item that they often came to buy something new.
  • Some of the orphan items were returned to their manufacturers, to their appreciation, granting "favors" to the company in return.
  • Replacement Rolex watch cases generated more than $ 10,000 in revenue on Ebay. Most people don't realize that having the original box and papers of ANY watch increases its value, resale or otherwise.
  • A LARGE AMOUNT of storage space was reclaimed and used to organize and store marketing materials, which also helped increase sales.
  • Among other benefits….

Reading this, most people would think along the lines of, "Wow, the owners must have appreciated all of this effort plus the value and income that increased as a result." I wish it were so, but not really.

At least one of the owners (of the four) said it was a waste of time and at least one of the employees said that he seemed to "screw the bosses" and that he "made the other employees look bad" because he never had the ambition to do what I did.

This task took almost 2 weeks to complete and even the naysayers were impressed in the end, mainly because one particular owner stopped complaining about the "company mess" as he called it, and the benefit to his work and daily tasks due to the importance Reducing clutter in our storage room.

Right after this project, about 2 weeks later, I started another similar project that was much less obvious. Only my immediate supervisor knew about it and I had to do it to some degree in secret.

This business had one large safe that held the most valuable items each day, but it had TWO OTHER safes to store items that didn't need as easy access.

Suffice it to say, I "sorted, evaluated, and made a determination" for about $ 2 million in loose gems, gold and silver bars, various vintage collectibles, and "leftover watch pieces" that had a wholesale value of approximately $ 50,000. only.

They still fired me when the economy went bad and now they are one store.

Yes. I'm a former child prodigy with a terribly small working memory.

PS: I am not a prodigy in the technical definition of "professional level between 10 and 12 years old"

As a math prodigy, I have a hard time remembering a 7-digit phone number. Distract me and I'll forget the last digits. You know all those prodigies that multiply 12-digit numbers in their head, NOT me. Analysis, group theory, probability, statistics ... no problem.

I am having trouble reciting a sentence longer than 7-10 words (unless I resort to mnemonics and use a LOT of effort). Actor would be a nightmare job, and it would suck!

Identifying i

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Yes. I'm a former child prodigy with a terribly small working memory.

PS: I am not a prodigy in the technical definition of "professional level between 10 and 12 years old"

As a math prodigy, I have a hard time remembering a 7-digit phone number. Distract me and I'll forget the last digits. You know all those prodigies that multiply 12-digit numbers in their head, NOT me. Analysis, group theory, probability, statistics ... no problem.

I am having trouble reciting a sentence longer than 7-10 words (unless I resort to mnemonics and use a LOT of effort). Actor would be a nightmare job, and it would suck!

Identify interesting concepts and opinions from 20 web pages and articles quickly… no problem. Botany, anatomy, oh boy ... big problem.

When I started dancing, I had a hard time remembering more than 3-4 movements in a count of 8, ... much less than 5 minutes of a dance piece.

Some of my friends are NOT like that. One went to see a musical and was able to sing all the songs again.

Another may remember the 52 cards when we played bridge. I can barely remember the A-10 of each club, even with LOTS of practice.

——-
Which seems to work very well for me (and compensates for the very poor memory):

(1) my unconscious seems to be able to recognize and remember general patterns in long-term memory.

(2) my unconscious signals the novelty and interest of a sea of ​​information.

I read a story about a guy who knew flora so well that he could fly in a plane over the Amazon and recognize new species from the air.

I can look at a page of information and in 0.1–5.0 seconds, sometimes something on the page catches my eye. Sometimes a quick glance (<1 second) will tell me that there is very little chance that something on the page is interesting (this is sometimes very wrong).

Unlike people with visual memory, who can close their eyes and remember an entire page… I don't see anything if I close my eyes (Aphantasia - Wikipedia).

But with my eyes open, I can scan the page from multiple angles and directions by piecing together sentence fragments of 20 sentences at a time. … It is a mostly unconscious process.

Even as I type this sentence, my eyes are jumping to scan the four paragraphs above, the paragraph and comment below, and other windows on the computer screen.

(3) my conscious mind is able to use these "novelty flags" and "feeling patterns" to analyze and synthesize.

Most of my thinking is "degree of success / error", "degree of novelty / interest", "how to make good guesses" ... but I can resort to a careful step-by-step analysis (of the training in mathematics and logic ) as a last resort.

IQ 135 is high but not great. You are at the upper level of the so-called "sweet spot" of 120 to 135. Your IQ implies that you are 1 in 100 in the Caucasian population and that you are likely to be successful in whatever career you choose, with possible exceptions of a Scientist. Nobel laureate or chess professional. 1 in 100 is not so rare when the population is large enough.

You feel incompetent and for only three reasons:

  1. The communication range, which is two standard deviations (+/- 2 sigmas) in any direction. Hers is 103 to 167. The concept of communication range was first found b
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IQ 135 is high but not great. You are at the upper level of the so-called "sweet spot" of 120 to 135. Your IQ implies that you are 1 in 100 in the Caucasian population and that you are likely to be successful in whatever career you choose, with possible exceptions of a Scientist. Nobel laureate or chess professional. 1 in 100 is not so rare when the population is large enough.

You feel incompetent and for only three reasons:

  1. The communication range, which is two standard deviations (+/- 2 sigmas) in any direction. Hers is 103 to 167. The concept of communication range was first found by Leta Hollingworth and later popularized by Grady M. Towers. All meaningful human relationships, including friendships and the search for a spouse, occur in that range. Basically you are restricted to 40% of the population and you are likely to feel lonely.
  2. The Maturity Question: The smarter you are, the slower you will mature, but also the more you will mature. Your less gifted peers are likely much more mature and "grown-up" than you at this time. But you will ignore them at about 25 and you will see them at 30 as youthful, dumb, and immature. Different levels of maturity will make you feel uncomfortable and you will feel like you don't fit in.
  3. The Dunning-Kruger effect. In the field of psychology, the Dunning-Kruger effect is a cognitive bias in which people of low ability suffer from an illusory superiority, by wrongly evaluating their cognitive ability as greater than it is. The cognitive bias of illusory superiority stems from the metacognitive inability of people with a low ability to recognize their own inadequacy. Without the self-awareness of metacognition, people with low ability cannot objectively assess their actual competence or incompetence. And in his case it is the reverse: those who really master something and have merits, evaluate their own ability much lower than it really is. In his case (and I suppose yours too) it is an illusory inferiority.

Youth is like a disease that heals with age. If you have it difficult, I can tell you that those over 140 have it even more difficult. Your IQ is right at the upper limit of the sweet spot where your cognitive ability is high enough to master any task, but also your communication range is wide enough to cover the majority of the population and allow you to perform well socially.

And finally: if you feel like you are the smartest person in the room, you most likely are. In this case, you are in the wrong room. Find a room where people are even smarter than you; both will benefit from it.

This is an interesting question. Let me answer with a twist.

Imagine the year 2000 BC. C. You are a very intelligent young man (150+ IQ) with a nominal physique, and you are part of a tribe of 20 men.

You've been hunting deer for days and you finally find one. They all hunt it and eat it together. Suddenly you see another calm deer that doesn't run away, and they all hunt that too. The tribe wants to eat that too, but you refuse, saying it is a better idea to save it for later, because it is currently full and eating another deer would be a waste of resources and would not help you at all.

The tr

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This is an interesting question. Let me answer with a twist.

Imagine the year 2000 BC. C. You are a very intelligent young man (150+ IQ) with a nominal physique, and you are part of a tribe of 20 men.

You've been hunting deer for days and you finally find one. They all hunt it and eat it together. Suddenly you see another calm deer that doesn't run away, and they all hunt that too. The tribe wants to eat that too, but you refuse, saying it is a better idea to save it for later, because it is currently full and eating another deer would be a waste of resources and would not help you at all.

The tribe ignores you despite everything, bakes and eats deer, and you don't. The tribe doesn't go hunting for a month because they are so full and sick, and you are starving. The end.

You did the right thing in that scenario, but it resulted in your disappearance. Why is that? Because everyone else did the wrong thing. At least in that scenario, they didn't actively try to destroy you, which is more prevalent (do you think you're smart enough not to need deer now? You don't get anything from the next hunt).

Being an outlier is not a survivable trait. If having a high IQ was directly associated with social success, then the human IQ should have risen steadily for the past few thousand years. But it hasn't.

Having a very high or very low IQ works against survival. Makes the whole world your enemy. Like everyone feels like they are dragging out low IQ people, and if times get tough, everyone thinks that high IQ people are plotting against them and abusing them, especially if they know that difference. So when times get tough, they drop the weight.

Then yes. A high IQ can cause you to lose your job. And it happens frequently. Especially since the other members of the staff understand that you are different and then they unite against you. Sometimes because you are too frustrated by the stupid things other people do, you rub it on their face and then they rally against you faster.

The only survival mechanism for a high IQ individual is to keep your head down, not let anyone know this difference, and guide your stupidity to your own advantage.

Let's start with some basics. Having a high IQ (as measured by standard tests) is, statistically speaking, an indicator that a person has an exceptional talent for using their brain. (Yes, exceptionally. An IQ of 140 means you scored higher than about 99.5% of all people tested. 150 is better than 99.95% and 160 is better than 99.995%).

Being good at using your brain is like being good at anything else. If you enjoy doing it and can get paid for it, you win! So people who are good at lifting heavy things are suitable for jobs that require a lot of force. (Not only ba

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Let's start with some basics. Having a high IQ (as measured by standard tests) is, statistically speaking, an indicator that a person has an exceptional talent for using their brain. (Yes, exceptionally. An IQ of 140 means you scored higher than about 99.5% of all people tested. 150 is better than 99.95% and 160 is better than 99.995%).

Being good at using your brain is like being good at anything else. If you enjoy doing it and can get paid for it, you win! So people who are good at lifting heavy things are suitable for jobs that require a lot of force. (Not just basic work, but also firefighter, soccer player, or bar keeper.) People who are good at music are suitable for musical jobs: singers, performers, composers, producers, etc. Good at empathizing with people, they adapt to jobs that require a lot of empathy. People who… well, you get the idea. If you are good at something, you are likely to be fit for a job that requires great skill at what you are good at.

Now, what kinds of jobs are suitable for people who can think? I'm a software developer, and several other Quorans have mentioned it as well, so yeah, definitely being good at thinking is well suited to computer programming. So is day trading. So is medicine. So is theoretical physics, engineering, and many other things.

So yeah, find something you love to do that exercises and invigorates your brain, if that's what feels good, and you can find someone who will pay you to do it.

At around 22-24 years of age, I got a good paying job.

It helped that I got my first professional experience in the aerospace industry when I was 14/5 1.

"At his age, the boy has the problem-solving skills of a recent Computer Science graduate," my then boss told the father of a friend who happens to be the director of a research institution.

The experience was not common and most likely I was the youngest intern in the history of INVAP.

It was news.

INVAP is NASA from Argentina. They are recognized nationally for their technology. Satellites, nuclear reactors, medical equipment, etc.

To be honest, IQ had some influence on

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Footnotes

1 Omar Bessa's answer to If your profession is software engineering, at what age did you first become interested in computers?

At around 22-24 years of age, I got a good paying job.

It helped that I got my first professional experience in the aerospace industry when I was 14/5 1.

"At his age, the boy has the problem-solving skills of a recent Computer Science graduate," my then boss told the father of a friend who happens to be the director of a research institution.

The experience was not common and most likely I was the youngest intern in the history of INVAP.

It was news.

INVAP is NASA from Argentina. They are recognized nationally for their technology. Satellites, nuclear reactors, medical equipment, etc.

To be honest, IQ had some influence, albeit in an indirect way. He already possessed the skills. I just needed a better environment in which to apply them.

INVAP was that environment.

The funny thing is, after that first tech experience, I didn't go back to tech for a couple of years.

My younger self thought I needed lessons from different settings, so I:

  • Dishes washed.
  • Mopped floors.
  • Waiting tables.
  • Cooked.
  • Did customer service.
  • Packed shipping papers on a dock.
  • He wrote a novel. He filed it away.
  • He ran a radio station. Sold.
  • He ran a newspaper. Sold.

And after that I got a six-figure technical job for a short time. Then I:

  • It started implementing an artificial intelligence trading operation for a Hong Kong index fund.
  • Led the development of the software for a cancer research project.
  • He became a cryptocurrency journalist 2. I was a hodler 3.

And then I started doing six figures again. I even ran a YC 4 company for a time.

In case you're wondering, the highest bids I've reached are around $ 400k annually (before taxes). The highest hourly wage of all time was around $ 5k / hr, advising a semi-anonymous Bitcoin millionaire on investment decisions.

My peculiar condition and background are such that I am unemployed / underemployed or making small fortunes. Which has led me to hard bouts of frustration and anger in the past, which are all over Quora.

It is really difficult for me to find a suitable job, I am always very underutilized and misunderstood.

Some of the following conditions may apply:

  1. They hire me with great initial enthusiasm.
    1. So the management has strange ideas about me.
      1. If weird ideas are good. Everything is fine.
      2. If the strange ideas are not realistic. I'm going.
    2. So management feels like they have hired Einstein to do the paperwork.
      1. Uncomfortable feelings of inadequacy follow.
      2. They underutilize me.
    3. So management feels domineering due to ego issues.
      1. They underutilize me.
    4. So management feels threatened.
      1. Good ideas go to waste ignored.
      2. B-players with ego problems 5 get angry and actively antagonize me. Antagonism breeds violence. I go in peace.
    5. So the management doesn't know what to do with me.
      1. They underutilize me.
    6. Then management does a terrible job of assigning me tasks.
      1. They underutilize me.
    7. So management loves you and gives you the freedom to act.
      1. They don't have enough money as an alternative and the job is boring / unchallenged. You wish it weren't so.
  2. I give a good scare 6 to the interviewer 7.
    1. I am not hired.
  3. The prospective employer feels they would be overqualified.
    1. The label is an excuse.
      1. I forgot to shower before the interview. Not hired.
      2. The employer is racist 8. Not hired.
      3. The employer doesn't like me. Not hired.
      4. Etc. I am not hired.
    2. The label is real 9.
      1. I am not hired. See 1.bi and 2.a.
  4. I play dumb in an interview.
    1. The interviewer is confused.
      1. I am not hired.
    2. CHA's check goes through.
      1. I'm hired.
  5. Actually, you don't need to be smart for work.
    1. I know someone at the company.
      1. They hire me.
    2. Nobody knows that I am smart.
      1. They hire me.
    3. The interviewer likes me.
      1. They hire me.

While the list is not necessarily exhaustive / complete, it does paint something of a picture. For the rest you have my LinkedIn 10.

It is very likely that a more optimal route is to restart the business activity, the only one in which I am really productive in its entirety.

That or get 10 million dollars and a lab.

Bootstrapping my stuff seems more likely. Although my country is one of the worst places on Earth to start a business.

To end:

  1. IQ helps with learning. But they hire you for skills.
    1. Sit back and study.
  2. People who hire you for "genius" are a recipe for disaster.
    1. Unrealistic expectations.
  3. As much as movies like "Good Will Hunting" might suggest. IQ is counterproductive to getting a job.
    1. People feel threatened.
    2. For the most part, it will be vastly underutilized.

I could add many more footnotes to this, but it will take hours. There are a dozen more answers here that you could link to.

Hopefully this is enlightening enough.

Footnotes

1 Omar Bessa's answer to If your profession is software engineering, at what age did you first become interested in computers? 2 Articles by Omar Bessa on Cointelegraph 3 Omar Bessa's answer to How much money do Bitcoin miners make? 4 Omar Bessa's response to What was your most remarkable achievement this year? 5 Omar Bessa's answer to Why do some software engineers have their sights lower than FAANG? 6 https: //www.quora. com / What-is-the-biggest-single-green-flag-during-a-job-interview / answer / David-Seidman / comment / 91913466 7 It could also come back ... 8 Overqualified . Now in Germany. 9 Excess screwing 10 https://www.linkedin.com/in/omarbessa/

This has more to do with your outlook on life, your inner world, your sense of humor.

During a summer break from my undergraduate studies in Electrical Engineering, I looked for a summer job in New Hampshire. I found advertisements for a company known for electronics. Teledyne, or Teredyne, or something like that. They manufactured circuit boards for various systems (be it defense, medical, etc.).

After submitting an application, I came in for an interview and realized that it was not the kind of job that I was going to do for me to apply for my engineering degree. Nevertheless, I accepted the job. It was only for a couple of months and I

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This has more to do with your outlook on life, your inner world, your sense of humor.

During a summer break from my undergraduate studies in Electrical Engineering, I looked for a summer job in New Hampshire. I found advertisements for a company known for electronics. Teledyne, or Teredyne, or something like that. They manufactured circuit boards for various systems (be it defense, medical, etc.).

After submitting an application, I came in for an interview and realized that it was not the kind of job that I was going to do for me to apply for my engineering degree. Nevertheless, I accepted the job. It was only for a couple of months and I was mainly interested in earning some money to enjoy my summer; the most important thing that summer was hanging out with friends, family.

So for about two months I worked on a circuit board assembly line. My co-workers came from various backgrounds, perhaps I was the most educated, and at first it was quite boring, worldly.

What do you do when you are bored? For one thing, you can talk to people. I'm an introvert, but nothing like the presence of coworkers along with an un-stimulating job to get me talking! And most importantly, one of my co-workers was a very pretty girl with a read head. Every day I thought about how I would approach her and ask her out. It was only towards the end that I steeled myself, and we only had one date, but the point is that one can always make the most of a situation if there is some other appeal. By the way, I suspect a lot of Quora writers would have made up something here, like "And now that red-haired girl is my wife." You know what I'm talking about ... Ahhh, the fictional worlds of Quora ...

However, in my case I had to deal with boredom, and circumstances other than job satisfaction kept me fully committed to the workplace.

But what about real adversity? What do people do when faced with truly shocking situations? I saw the movie Unbroken last night. A couple of years ago I remember seeing Touching the Void. These movies are about extreme examples of "handling" something.

So if someone says that a very smart person can't "handle" a factory job, maybe they need to rate what is meant by "handle"? Otherwise, regardless of intelligence level, I think it would be quite embarrassing if working in a factory became a breaking point for what is manageable, because the lower your level to handle non-ideal situations, the more likely you are to that breaks catastrophically. in much more adverse situations.

Others wrote about how a job in a factory can be a path. So, use your intelligence to figure out how that factory environment is going to be a stepping stone to something.

Brian

I don't have a college degree. I was president of one company and vice president of all others, even those that required a college degree. What I did was start small, get all the professional licenses I could, and do my job better than everyone else.

I also joined Mensa so that I could include it in the organizations to which I belong. I sent my resume directly to the companies using an explicit cover letter for them. If you use an online job site, your target could be software reviewed and kicked out due to no grade. I was earning more than my father at 25 years old. I also had my primary professional license at 22, which

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I don't have a college degree. I was president of one company and vice president of all others, even those that required a college degree. What I did was start small, get all the professional licenses I could, and do my job better than everyone else.

I also joined Mensa so that I could include it in the organizations to which I belong. I sent my resume directly to the companies using an explicit cover letter for them. If you use an online job site, your target could be software reviewed and kicked out due to no grade. I was earning more than my father at 25 years old. I also had my primary professional license at 22, making me the second youngest license holder.

I also limited myself to industries where a college degree or experience is required. You don't have any to work in a medical company where college ties are worn or among people with degrees from top universities. However, I did it once successfully after passing an IQ test.

I earned six-figure salaries most of my life. I reached the top of my profession without a degree. You must have a good frame of mind, be willing to do whatever it takes to be successful. Above all, you need to sell yourself and a great list of accomplishments that are impressive. A good resume can make up for a college degree. After all, most companies want people who can make money for them.

There are companies that hire Mensa members. I worked for some of them, so ignore those who THINK including Mensa on your resume is a bad thing. It's a good thing and the only way employers will know that you are very smart.

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