How many hours a week is a 9 to 5 job?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Faith Parker



How many hours a week is a 9 to 5 job?

I think the term “9 to 5 job” originally referred to bank jobs in the US, when they were the daily hours they were open to the public. It then became a common term for many professional companies that generally operated the same or very similar hours. That, of course, would be exactly 8 hours a day and 40 hours a week with no time off for lunch. In reality, even banks required employees to do pre and post activities before and after the opening hours available to customers, and of course employees had time off for lunch. The 40 hour work week remains with time off for lunch

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I think the term “9 to 5 job” originally referred to bank jobs in the US, when they were the daily hours they were open to the public. It then became a common term for many professional companies that generally operated the same or very similar hours. That, of course, would be exactly 8 hours a day and 40 hours a week with no time off for lunch. In reality, even banks required employees to do pre and post activities before and after the opening hours available to customers, and of course employees had time off for lunch. The 40 hour work week with time off for lunch is still a standard today, but the number of exceptions to this has increased dramatically, although it remains the standard in most government jobs. Today, in many professional and salaried positions, the base salary is still calculated at 40 hours per week, but working additional hours without additional pay is an expectation. Similarly, many jobs with direct hourly pay require more than 40 hours per week, but employees are paid (often at a higher hourly rate) for the additional hours.

There are 8 hours between 9 a.m. M. And 5 p.m. M. However, most employers usually give 1 hour for lunch. Therefore, working hours are reduced to 7 hours a day. Multiply 7 hours a day by 5 days a week, you get 35 hours a week.

Obviously, this would be different if the employer gave half an hour for lunch or more than an hour, but most give 1 hour. Lunch is not paid for almost everywhere.

There are 8 hours in the 9:00 AM time frame. M. At 5:00 p. M.

There are 5 business days in a week where I live.

8 multiply by 5 = 40 hours per week.

There is one hour of lunch break per day from 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm

1 multiply by 5 = 5 hours per week.

So, subtract 5 hours a week.

(40-5) hours = 35 hours.

So there are a total of 35 working hours a week in a 9 to 5 job.

-Taimia Hussain

Before being a teacher and a domestic violence advocate, I worked in a bank. It was from 8 to 5, that is, 9 hours. They paid me 40 hours, I had a 45 minute lunch and a 15 minute lunch. break. It is an expression and is not intended to be literal. "9 to 5" means an office job that is quite boring and not very important. How to be a doctor and dentist loan officer, ugh. Again, it is not intended to be literal. It is a reference to office jobs.

The phrase 9 to 5 is a substitute for a regular day day job.

Having worked a few regular jobs during the day and meeting people who work those jobs, my observation is as follows:

Day jobs with regular hours range from about 36 hours a week to 40 or 44 hours a week.

YMMV

Thanks for the A2A Mohammed Saiful Alam Siddiquee (मुहम्मद सैफुल आलम सिद्दीकी).

In my experience, the standard is 35 or 37.5 of the 40 hour workweek. It depends on what work you do and where you do it, but you will tend to have an hour or a half hour for lunch. My work week is 40 hours, as I do not take lunch breaks, but my situation, that I know, is not common.

40 hours

Traditional American business hours are 9:00 am to 5:00 pm, Monday through Friday, representing a five-day, eight-hour workweek comprising 40 hours in total.

For a 9 to 5 job, it depends on whether the job is full-time, part-time, or the person is paid for their break.

I work long hours. If I need to go to the dentist or doctor, I just go. I try to schedule the first appointment of the day. The doctor won't be late and then I can go to work.

If my car needs service, I usually drop it off first thing in the morning. Car dealership service locations generally open at 7:30 am or so.

Otherwise, unless it's a really weird situation, my wife does it or I do it on the weekends. We have a dry cleaner that picks up and delivers.

For bulk purchases, instead of Costco, I used a combination of Boxed, Walmart (online), and Amazon. Since I am a fan of spreadsheets, I made a table of the common things

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I work long hours. If I need to go to the dentist or doctor, I just go. I try to schedule the first appointment of the day. The doctor won't be late and then I can go to work.

If my car needs service, I usually drop it off first thing in the morning. Car dealership service locations generally open at 7:30 am or so.

Otherwise, unless it's a really weird situation, my wife does it or I do it on the weekends. We have a dry cleaner that picks up and delivers.

For bulk purchases, instead of Costco, I used a combination of Boxed, Walmart (online), and Amazon. Since I am a fan of spreadsheets, I made a table of the common things that I buy and then I got the price of the spreadsheet per unit (ounce, pound, etc) and then I order items from where it is cheapest.

Obviously, I can't order frozen stuff this way, but it's a lot more efficient. We also do a lot of Peapod so we minimize our time shopping. But Peapod is not that cheap. But it has perishable and frozen products. I also have the prices in my spreadsheet.

Costco is about a 30 minute drive away. On Saturdays and Sundays, it's crowded, and the entire shopping experience takes about 2.5 hours round-trip, when you add time to drive, park, find what you need, and pay. I can order online in 20 minutes. Then a guy in a brown truck drops it at my door. It may cost a bit more to do it this way compared to Costco, but I'd rather not spend the hours at Costco. We don't have a big freezer so I wouldn't get that many frozen stuff at Costco anyway. In fact, I found a price list for Costco and compared it to my spreadsheet, and found that it was about 5% more than Costco. And this is without any membership fee.

We drink a lot of flavored Polar mineral water and Boxed sells it for a lot less than the local Stop & Shop. I have toilet paper, paper towels, plastic bags, peanut butter, salad dressing, canned goods, dog food, snacks, pretzels, toothpaste, soap, shampoo, detergent, and other non-perishable items this way.

The other advantage of ordering online is that at 11:00 p.m. M., I can decide to order. If I'm not sure if we need peanut butter, I go into the next room, open the cabinet, and look. I was in a store, I saw something, I was not sure if we needed it and I bought it, only to find that I really did not need it. I can place my order from 11:00 to 11:20 PM. Boxed's things come fast, because his warehouse is about 70 miles away. Often just two days later I get what I ordered.

However, you should use a spreadsheet, as prices can vary greatly not only from store to store, but even within the same store for different sizes. Amazon is the strangest in its price: 12 of something can sometimes be cheaper or just more than 6 of the same, because they have different suppliers. And your spreadsheet needs to take into account different sizes - for paper towels, I show prices per 100 square feet, not per rolls (because the rolls can be really different sizes). For the tomato sauce, its price for every 10 ounces or something like that. The spreadsheet then uses an if function to tell which store is the cheapest. If I notice that a store has changed its price, I update the spreadsheet. So I am taking the lowest price from four traders, so probably, All in all, it's not much more than Costco. All of these places have "free" shipping.

It's easy to find things with the search button, whereas at Costco I need to wander aimlessly.

Usually I subscribe and save to Amazon, and I just let those things come if I need them or delay them. Then I place orders for Walmart and Boxed at the same time in different browser windows. I just go to the spreadsheet, and if I need something, I go to that browser window and order. Then I quickly go through the specials and new items, hit submit, and then wait for the UPS guy or Fedex guy.

This is what my "Costco career" looks like.

I avoid this.

A2A

I would say that there are several schools of thought on this.


Events (edit)

Personally, I really dislike the "gig economy" thing that's going on right now.

On the other hand ... I can understand that people "don't want to be tied down", and all the other things that go with car payment, insurance, and mortgage payment, and that the Orkin Man comes in once a month. . , because both you and your wife are afraid of spiders death.

And, if you're just starting out, that means a full-time job will be all the hassle of having all of that ...

And not get to have all that. Because

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A2A

I would say that there are several schools of thought on this.


Events (edit)

Personally, I really dislike the "gig economy" thing that's going on right now.

On the other hand ... I can understand that people "don't want to be tied down", and all the other things that go with car payment, insurance, and mortgage payment, and that the Orkin Man comes in once a month. . , because both you and your wife are afraid of spiders death.

And, if you're just starting out, that means a full-time job will be all the hassle of having all of that ...

And not get to have all that. Because you are just beginning.

The “benefit portability” legislation that you are talking about, and by the way, only applies to hires that are lucrative from a tax point of view; Are you a masseur, hairdresser, beautician or auto mechanic with a bay at a car dealership? Yeah, contractors don't count, go pound sand, well, it gives me the creeps.

Therefore, I fully support people who get involved in the "contractor" / "gig" business model if they wish.

I think it's a dead end for workers, unless you're doing very lucrative consulting work on longer-term contracts.

A drive to McDonalds for a drunk bite at 5 in the morning? It is not a longer term contract.


Start your own business

This is very, very difficult.

Here are the stats: 95% of all startups fail in the first year. 98% of new businesses fail in the first five years.

It is unlikely to be any different, unless you understand the following terms:

  • Cash Flow
  • Float
  • Run rate
  • ROI
  • Amortization
  • W-2
  • W-4
  • 1040 (not 1040EZ)
  • Double entry accounting
  • etc.

Don't bother doing a Google search - unless you can fill in the "etc." In part, you'll be doomed unless you take some business and accounting classes at your local community college.

The point is: we don't teach simple cash flow economics in high school, and I would be very surprised if someone reading this, who is under 40, is a member of 4H or Junior Achievement or Junior Business League or Future. Business leaders of America.

Most people cannot manage their household budget.

Prove me wrong.

If you live alone or with a partner, change your household budget. Include the budget lines needed to add a baby.

Now go out and open a separate bank account. Every time you have spent money from the baby budget, put it in that account. Do this for a year. Come back and tell us two things:

  1. How much did you earn that year?
  2. How much is now in the baby's account?

The results will surprise you.

If that's as much as I think it would be on the bill as a percentage of your yearly income if you actually had a baby? It will also surprise me.

I am prepared not to be surprised.


Get a job

This is by far the easiest of the three options, if you want to eat regularly and you don't live for free in your parents' basement, and your mom doesn't wash your clothes and at least occasionally feeds you. .

It is not glamorous.

Well, okay, if you're a runway model - it's pretty glamorous. You're probably not a runway model (but if you are: give me a call, we'll have lunch).

You get a fixed salary. You pay taxes. You have little to show, other than when an idiot yells “Get a life!”, You can smile and say “No thanks: I already have one”.

And if you do the baby experiment at the same time, without the baby, you may eventually find that you have enough money for a down payment on something.


Is it worth working a full-time job?

I'd say it depends on what you value.

For example: how attached are you, really, to eating? Be honest…

First of all, the 8-hour workday is codified in US labor laws.As someone who has worked in HR, you need to know this, it's history, and how it affects things like overtime, differences in hours worked by exempt and nonexempt employees, part-time workers, and independent contractors. So the notion is not "ridiculous".

You seem to like your job and there may be financial and intangible rewards for working your schedule. And you probably don't have outside concerns that affect your happiness. You're lucky.

Many of your colleagues may not be so lucky. They can hate their jobs and they can't

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First of all, the 8-hour workday is codified in US labor laws.As someone who has worked in HR, you need to know this, it's history, and how it affects things like overtime, differences in hours worked by exempt and nonexempt employees, part-time workers, and independent contractors. So the notion is not "ridiculous".

You seem to like your job and there may be financial and intangible rewards for working your schedule. And you probably don't have outside concerns that affect your happiness. You're lucky.

Many of your colleagues may not be so lucky. They can hate their jobs and can't wait until 5 o'clock to go home. Or they may like their work, but have a number of external concerns and situations that cause their lives to go from being less happy (in comparison) to miserable: bad marriage, health problems, financial problems, children in trouble with the law. , balance work and family with personal care for elderly parents. Who knows?

Some of them may not have activities or hobbies that make them happy outside of work. Maybe you don't either, and work makes you happy, especially if it's meaningful. I've worked in start-ups and the excitement factor alone keeps you going 12 hours a day. Most people don't have that opportunity. I also played competitive amateur sports until I was 50, which kept me happy in some boring jobs. Some people go back to school part-time to learn new skills, so they can advance in their current career or open doors to new ones that make them happy. I did. One of the smartest things I ever did and it allowed me to retire early.

Now I do new things and keep myself busy and happy. And "work" on those new things. For the past year and a half, I have taken a course in stock option trading, a review in statistics, and another in stock valuation. That would make some people miserable. I am a volunteer on a local university project to bring a medical device to market guiding their intellectual property efforts. He also had a consulting contract to provide training to local nonprofits. I'm going to do a financial planning seminar next weekend. The alternatives are to go back to work or sit in front of the tube doing nothing and feeling miserable.

As they used to say in the 70s: different styles for different people. I'm glad you're happy with what you're doing and must consider yourself lucky. That's the way I see my situation and I still have a long list of items that I want to explore.

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