How effective are intensive 2-3 month programming courses? Can they get you a good job?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Casey Workman



How effective are intensive 2-3 month programming courses? Can they get you a good job?

It's like most things.

  • A person who plays basketball 4 times a week for 5 years versus a person who goes through an intense basketball camp for 3 months.
  • 5 years of long-distance running several times a week vs. 3 months of running every day.
  • 5 years painting against 3 months of intense Bob Ross marathons.

When we ask how effective bootcamps are and if they can get you a real job, we are really asking:

How does a bootcamper compare to computer majors? "

Effective?

Yes and no.

If you go through a good program, you will graduate knowing some useful and current tools. The problem is that current tools have a useful life

Keep reading

It's like most things.

  • A person who plays basketball 4 times a week for 5 years versus a person who goes through an intense basketball camp for 3 months.
  • 5 years of long-distance running several times a week vs. 3 months of running every day.
  • 5 years painting against 3 months of intense Bob Ross marathons.

When we ask how effective bootcamps are and if they can get you a real job, we are really asking:

How does a bootcamper compare to computer majors? "

Effective?

Yes and no.

If you go through a good program, you will graduate knowing some useful and current tools. The problem is that today's tools have a useful life measured in months. It's like learning how to use a state-of-the-art nail gun, but not knowing how to drive nails with other tools, using too many (or too few) nails, and not knowing why that nail in the ceiling is affecting that wall over there. Run a great program, you can get some out of it, but not enough.

Time matters. 3 months is just under the average length of a semester. So in the 3 months that a CS student is taking OS, Computer Vision, Embedded Systems, and Linear Algebra, a bootcamper is expected to be ready for work.

There are always exceptions. Take German, for example. A person could study Thai for 5 years at school and learn much more by spending 3 months immersed in Phuket. Someone who worked out without enthusiasm for years would see better results with 3 months of serious time in the gym.

I've seen bootcampers go out and be pretty good, but I've seen more come out with very limited capacity, and they don't adapt or aren't able to acquire new tools. They end up doing other work close to the code, but not writing it.

Good job?

Again, yes and no.

I work with a guy who was hired when I did. Earn more than many of the people I graduated with. That said, it is exceptional. He's already worked for the company, he's worked hard, and he's exceptionally smart.

I also know of a bootcamper who has not been able to get a software position for over 6 months.

If you can show your talent (for example, projects), you can sell to employers, but not everyone. They have to decide between someone with 5 years of practice or 3 months. Generally, they are going to choose the CS graduate. Unless you can convince them that it is better, the CS graduate will get the offer.

conclusion

Who would be better, a 5 year old or a 3 month old lawyer? A doctor? A firefighter? Time and experience matter. Many people underestimate the body of knowledge it takes to design real software, rather than using a hands-on stack.

I'm not attacking boot camps. If you can't get a CS degree, do it! However, do your research very carefully and choose a good program!

It all depends on your end goal. If these courses lead you to having a solid portfolio and maybe a blog showcasing your current projects, then yes. The problem with people who go to a coding bootcamp is that they don't have a goal, and as a result, some people give up or bounce all over the place.

It really is very helpful to learn a 2-3 month course, because you can get lab training with in-depth knowledge. So that we can get TOP MNC company with high package. At my suggestion, I was placed in an MNC company learning Python near my kk. nagar location. They offer in-depth training for Python.

If you want more details contact: 8608700340

Anything can get you a job. If you love programming, they can help you, if you are going to do it for money or for obligation or for any reason other than that you enjoy the work, they will leave you frustrated and knowledge will be lost quickly.

Looking for a job

It largely depends on the region in which you are looking for work. Assuming that you are looking for work in a place that is a technology center, then it depends on the type of experience you have and the approach you take to find interviews.

If you are a 10 year industry veteran, it is not very difficult to get "a" job at all. If you were desperate or hard-pressed to settle down, you could most likely land some kind of job in a week.

In the past, I found a company and scheduled an interview for one day, interviewed it the next day (a Friday) and then started work the day after that (a Monday).

T

Keep reading

Looking for a job

It largely depends on the region in which you are looking for work. Assuming that you are looking for work in a place that is a technology center, then it depends on the type of experience you have and the approach you take to find interviews.

If you are a 10 year industry veteran, it is not very difficult to get "a" job at all. If you were desperate or hard-pressed to settle down, you could most likely land some kind of job in a week.

In the past, I found a company and scheduled an interview for one day, interviewed it the next day (a Friday) and then started work the day after that (a Monday).

These days, I find that it takes at least a few weeks to go through the process, but I am also much more selective about what jobs I want to take and I am looking for medium-sized companies, who tend to be busy and slow with the process.

If you don't have a degree or a resume to talk about, then it can be a challenge to get an interview and a challenge to get an offer once you complete that interview. This is especially true in an economic downturn.

I never went to college or took more than one programming class. During the first two years as a software developer, I sought out interviews. He was a really good programmer, for someone who didn't even have initial experience, but I had a hard time getting interviews. This was around the year 2000, which may have had something to do with it.

I finally found a job on craigslist with a company that employed 3 people and paid me a relatively small hourly rate. I did very well there, but they only had a few months of work for me.

After that, the recruiters had something to work with. It took me 3 phone screens to get an in-person interview, and that earned me a 12-month contract at Microsoft. From that point on, people stopped asking me if I had a degree and the job search became as easy as it is now for me.

I find the easiest way to get an interview is through people you know and through recruiters. I find it much more difficult to send a cold email to a company and get a response, even with experience. Either employers just don't seem to want to check their inbox, or the companies I've been specifically looking for aren't looking for someone with exactly my background (both guesswork, as my emails have been ignored).

As someone who has previously been a manager and hired, I think companies would be more selective through a jobs @ email address than if they paid recruiters to find people for them. If they are paying recruiters, it is because they want to launch a wider network and they don't want to spend a lot of time dealing with recruitment. If they are talking to a candidate, they assume that the recruiter has previously screened them and that they are the closest match they will find. However, recruiters tend to be much less selective than hiring managers, which is why it tends to be a relatively easy way to get in.

Interviewing

Getting an interview is half the story. Passing the interview to get an offer is the other half.

You must have sales skills (to make them believe in your passion for programming and your company - "cultural fit"), as well as perform technically under pressure (white boards or technical round table displays).

Depending on the company, it must also have a lot of stamina. Some companies force you to do up to 5 interviews in the same day, for a position, after several rounds of technical phone screens before even getting an in-person interview. If you're not practicing ahead of time, you'll be much less likely to get an offer, even at companies that only interview you in person.

See the book "Breaking the Coding Interview" for a very comprehensive explanation of how to become good at this process.

Hello there!!

So, here are some things that people may find surprising about writing code:

  • Averaging the lifetime of the project, a programmer spends between 10% and 20% of their time writing code, and most programmers write between 10 and 12 lines of code per day that go to the final product, regardless of your skill level. Good programmers spend much of the other 90% thinking, researching, and experimenting to find the best design. Bad programmers spend much of that 90% debugging code making random changes and seeing if they work.
  • A good programmer is ten times more productive than the average program
Keep reading

Hello there!!

So, here are some things that people may find surprising about writing code:

  • Averaging the lifetime of the project, a programmer spends between 10% and 20% of their time writing code, and most programmers write between 10 and 12 lines of code per day that go to the final product, regardless of your skill level. Good programmers spend much of the other 90% thinking, researching, and experimenting to find the best design. Bad programmers spend much of that 90% debugging code making random changes and seeing if they work.
  • A good programmer is ten times more productive than the average programmer. A great programmer is 20 to 100 times more productive than the average. This is not an exaggeration - studies conducted since the 1960s have consistently shown this. Not only is a bad programmer unproductive, not only will they not get any work done, they will create a lot of work and headaches for others to fix.

"A great lathe operator earns several times the salary of an average lathe operator, but a great software code writer is worth 10,000 times the price of an average software writer." -Bill Gates

  • Great programmers spend little of their time writing code, at least code that ends up in the final product. Programmers who spend much of their time writing code are too lazy, too ignorant, or too arrogant to find existing solutions to old problems. Great programmers are adept at recognizing and reusing common patterns. Good programmers are not afraid to refactor (rewrite) their code to achieve the ideal design. Bad programmers write code that lacks conceptual integrity, non-redundancy, hierarchy, and patterns, making it very difficult to refactor. It's easier to get rid of bad code and start over than to change it.
  • Software development obeys the laws of entropy, like any other process. Continual change leads to software breakdown, eroding the conceptual integrity of the original design. Software rot is inevitable, but programmers who do not consider conceptual integrity create software that rots so quickly that it becomes useless even before it is completed. The entropic failure of conceptual integrity is probably the most common reason for a software project failure. (The second most common reason is to deliver something other than what the customer wanted.) Software breakdown slows progress exponentially, so many projects face explosive deadlines and budgets before they are thankfully eliminated.
    • A 2004 study found that the majority of software projects (51%) will fail in a critical area and 15% will totally fail. This is an improvement from 1994, when 31% failed.
  • Although most software is made by teams, it is not a democratic activity. Usually only one person is responsible for the design and the rest of the team fills in the details.
  • Programming is hard work. It is an intense mental activity. Good programmers think about their work 24/7. They write their most important code in the shower and in their dreams. Because the most important work is done outside of a keyboard, software projects cannot be sped up by spending more time in the office or adding more people to a project.

Well, these are the points ...

With the best wishes..!
Happy coding </>
Great day! :)

This is difficult to predict. I'm at risk of being wrong here. Allow me to issue some general forecasts for the next ten years. Choosing specific technologies is extremely difficult, because many of the most important, 10 years from now, do not yet exist. I will make some general forecasts before answering the question.

The gulf between great and mediocre programmers is going to widen. Single-stranded Moore's Law is over. What this means is that, as computing becomes cheaper, high-performance computing (relative to an ever-higher standard) becomes more difficult. We now live in a GPU world

Keep reading

This is difficult to predict. I'm at risk of being wrong here. Allow me to issue some general forecasts for the next ten years. Choosing specific technologies is extremely difficult, because many of the most important, 10 years from now, do not yet exist. I will make some general forecasts before answering the question.

The gulf between great and mediocre programmers is going to widen. Single-stranded Moore's Law is over. What this means is that, as computing becomes cheaper, high-performance computing (relative to an ever-higher standard) becomes more difficult. We now live in a world with GPUs, dozens of languages ​​that could be considered "important", and distributed programming evolving from an advanced topic to something that above-average programmers grapple with.

Functional programming will become more important. That being said, I don't think it will ever go mainstream. ("Functional programming will be mainstream in five years" is something people have been saying for at least thirty.) It will be something that will be used by the top 15% of programmers, but corporate programmers at the bottom will be able to ignore it. and "just use Java" for another 30 years.

Static writing is making a comeback. It is not just about "static writing", but about static (and to some extent dynamic) analysis: that is, the ability to reason about code and eliminate errors. People are getting tired of poor quality and faulty software and accept the impossibility of maintaining typical corporate code. We have learned that technology-related soft processes (eg "agile") make things worse and that there is no management "trick" to improve code quality, so we are going to start looking for solutions for the whole code. To make clear what I am not saying, I certainly do not believe that it is not possible to write high quality code in a dynamically written language; it certainly is, it just doesn't. It usually happens on a large scale when you have a broad spectrum of developer attitudes and skills. I think we are reaching a point where (as opposed to the opposite, which has been the case for at least a decade) we will see more evolution and progress in statically typed languages ​​than in dynamic ones. The most exciting work in the static world seems to focus on facilitating things that were typically ugly in static languages ​​(see: Edward Kmett's lens library at Haskell). Static writing is great, but its interface needs improvement. The most exciting work in the static world seems to focus on facilitating things that were typically ugly in static languages ​​(see: Edward Kmett's lens library at Haskell). Static writing is excellent, but its interface needs improvement. The most exciting work in the static world seems to focus on facilitating things that were typically ugly in static languages ​​(see: Edward Kmett's lens library at Haskell). Static writing is great, but its interface needs improvement.

So this covers the technical changes that I predict. I think it will be more important than ever to understand computer science, because I believe that the bifurcation of the software field is going to accelerate and the salaries of one group will improve while those of the other will decrease.

So what about related professions? I think "data science" is going to have a "well of disappointment" soon, because there is so much autoinflation and nonsense in that world, so I think people who know some tricks but don't actually write code or understand linear algebra they're going to take a hit. That said, I believe that the demand for genuine information on statistical algorithms and machine learning will remain stable and continue to improve. The problem with "data science" in most companies is that it is still responsive to business, and the business never really knows what these people can do. The field is still very important, but the hype will die.

I'd like to see the entire cottage industry disappear around process for process, in the name of "Agile." I really don't like it when someone who hasn't written a line of code for 15 years and who works at another company rushes in and says, "No one can work on things other than what is in their backlog." Do I have any idea if that is going to happen? No.

Regarding the industries that will need programmers, I think we will see a lot more work in medicine and life sciences. That seems obvious (which doesn't necessarily mean anything). We will probably also see more work for software people in energy production and natural resource extraction. Eventually, the internationalization of the networked world will accelerate and there will be many opportunities arising as new countries develop strong middle classes. Those seem like safe bets. However, when it comes to the more superficial and trendy things, it's really hard to predict whether, say, virtual worlds will catch on. So I'm not going to try to comment on that. I wouldn't have predicted Snapchat, which certainly deserves to fail, but is succeeding against good order and decency nonetheless.

It varies wildly, so you could really rely on a spectrum ranging from what you like to code to what hobbies you have, like gaming. Also, the programming languages ​​you master can greatly affect that.

Some careers a programmer can take

  • Game developer / programmer
  • IOS Application Developer / Programmer
  • Android App Developer / Programmer
  • Windows Application Developer / Programmer
  • Software Developer / Engineer / Programmer
  • Computer Systems Analyst / Engineer
  • Web developer
  • IT support specialist
  • Computer systems analyst
  • Database administrators
  • Information security analysts
  • Network and computer systems administrators
  • Cloud Developer
  • Embed
Keep reading

It varies wildly, so you could really rely on a spectrum ranging from what you like to code to what hobbies you have, like gaming. Also, the programming languages ​​you master can greatly affect that.

Some careers a programmer can take

  • Game developer / programmer
  • IOS Application Developer / Programmer
  • Android App Developer / Programmer
  • Windows Application Developer / Programmer
  • Software Developer / Engineer / Programmer
  • Computer Systems Analyst / Engineer
  • Web developer
  • IT support specialist
  • Computer systems analyst
  • Database administrators
  • Information security analysts
  • Network and computer systems administrators
  • Cloud Developer
  • Embedded Systems Developer / Programmer
  • Data Science Analyst / Programmer
  • Technology management
  • Computer Network Architect
  • Network and computer systems administrators
  • Artificial Intelligence Programmer
  • IT / Security / Network / Systems Consultant

Now, a developer is not always the same as a programmer, so make no mistake, the computer scientist is also a completely different field.

A computer scientist is both a mathematician and a technologist, they not only need to know that things work, they have to prove it.

A programmer writes some pretty good code. They constantly work to make it clean, well factored, and free of bugs (bugs), but not at the expense of getting the job done. It's about understanding what "good code" is and knowing what "bad code" is for them. They need to have some at least fundamental math skills, but this isn't a big concern of course, depending on what they need to code for. They need intensive knowledge of good solutions and algorithms for problems, but they don't need to prove that it is the best solution as they will eventually look at it later and decide oh maybe this is a better solution. A thorough understanding of algorithmic knowledge is essential.

A developer is an accomplished generalist with no real specialization. A developer is someone who is involved in the entire process, from gathering requirements, through specifying and coding, to testing, and yes, support. They may not be fully involved in all stages all the time. They are experts at finding ways to troubleshoot and connect components to meet a number of requirements. In their personal time, they are trying to be productive by doing various projects or participating in activities that have nothing to do with programming, development, or computing, but may still include technology in one form or another.

I would not agree with your premise. Many people are hired without a computer science degree. However, most of those people still have some kind of degree, probably in an engineering discipline.

If you have a degree (say, in Mechanical Engineering) and can demonstrate programming proficiency (through contributions to open source projects, participation in hackathons, etc.) on your CV, companies will show interest. It will be easier for a startup to hire you, but sometimes the bigger companies can find you.

If you are looking for a programming position at a startup, be sure to read Who Y Combinator

Keep reading

I would not agree with your premise. Many people are hired without a computer science degree. However, most of those people still have some kind of degree, probably in an engineering discipline.

If you have a degree (say, in Mechanical Engineering) and can demonstrate programming proficiency (through contributions to open source projects, participation in hackathons, etc.) on your CV, companies will show interest. It will be easier for a startup to hire you, but sometimes the bigger companies can find you.

If you're looking for a startup programming position, be sure to read Who Y Combinator Companies Want - Triplebyte Blog.

If you are looking for a job at a larger company and are about to enroll in a bootcamp (or some other training program), find out beforehand which companies have drawn talent from that bootcamp. For example, if you subscribe to the Udacity Newsletter, you will read from time to time about a nanograduate student who got a job at one of Udacity's many partners. That's only possible because Udacity has established its quality close to those companies.

Another possibility of getting a job of this type is to solve a problem that the company already has. Here's a great article on that. How To Get Any Job You Want (Even If You Are Unskilled) - Life Learning

Data science is a vast field and many skills are required in this field. Different types of job opportunities and job roles are available in this field. To get the desired job, you need to train in this field, as these 2 or 3 months are not enough. You must invest at least 6 to 8 months to train and be eligible for different jobs. For the data science field, you need to have deep knowledge about programming languages, ml algorithms, statistics, deep learning, etc.

If you are looking for an institute where you can train and gain in-depth knowledge about data

Keep reading

Data science is a vast field and many skills are required in this field. Different types of job opportunities and job roles are available in this field. To get the desired job, you need to train in this field, as these 2 or 3 months are not enough. You must invest at least 6 to 8 months to train and be eligible for different jobs. For the data science field, you need to have deep knowledge about programming languages, ml algorithms, statistics, deep learning, etc.

If you are looking for an institute where you can train and gain in-depth knowledge about the data science field, there are many institutes that offer data science courses. Few names are here

  • Great learning
  • Learnbay
  • Simpli learn
  • Data camp
  • Edx
  • Edureka
  • Inteelipat

Among those institutes I suggest the Learnbay training institute.

Learnbay has been jointly developed with IBM and they have started custom courses looking at job prospects and career opportunities for working professionals and beginners who want to start and shift their career into data science.

These courses are-

Data science and artificial intelligence course

This course is offered to those who have no work experience or have less than 5 years of work experience in any domain, whether they know programming or not.

The duration of this course is 6 months.

Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning Course

This course is offered for those who have 5-8 years of work experience in the IT field and have knowledge of programming languages ​​such as -java, C, C ++.

The duration of this course is 8 months.

Data Science Course for Managers and Leaders

This course is designed for those who have 9-15 years of work experience as a manager, team leader, and other high-profile job title.

The duration of this course is 9 months.

These three courses are a comprehensive program that will teach from theories to the practical implementation of model building and Google implementation.

They also provide a blended program where they will give you classroom project sessions with industry experts and if you want to continue the sessions online they will give you the flexibility to attend those classes.

These courses offer two types of job prospects after completing the course: individual collaborators and managers.

These programs are available in different cities: Mumbai, Pune, Chennai, Hyderabad, Bangalore, and Delhi.

Thanks!

First, you have to learn to program. Nobody hires programmers anymore (and they haven't for decades), programmers code our own programs (and when you've done that long enough, you think about the programming language you're working with, so once you've gotten into the program, it's pretty hard-coded in your mind).

So take a look at Teach Yourself Computer Science and see if you really want to put in that much time (it takes 1,000 to 2,000 hours, if it's analytical, if it's not, you might not be able to learn it). ).

Then look for jobs for programmers or developers, not coders.

(Many companies s

Keep reading

First, you have to learn to program. Nobody hires programmers anymore (and they haven't for decades), programmers code our own programs (and when you've done that long enough, you think about the programming language you're working with, so once you've gotten into the program, it's pretty hard-coded in your mind).

So take a look at Teach Yourself Computer Science and see if you really want to put in that much time (it takes 1,000 to 2,000 hours, if it's analytical, if it's not, you might not be able to learn it). ).

Then look for jobs for programmers or developers, not coders.

(Many companies still hire people without a degree or a degree in a relevant subject. Mine is in electrical engineering, when we learned about vacuum tubes. And I still worked until my arthritis got too bad to keep doing it, about 70 years of age.)

But just learning to code won't get you any jobs, because there are no such jobs anymore.

1. Data analysis

All data is all the rage right now. (HBR named data science the sexiest career of the century.) This career can take many forms. Some data analysts know programming languages ​​(like R or SAS). But data analysis can happen in many ways.

Much of the data analysis is based on the use of tools such as Microsoft Excel and even Google Analytics. Get familiar with these tools and use them to collect and study data on personal projects like your blog or social media to see if it's something you enjoy. (Hint: if you enjoyed math / statistics in school, you will probably enjoy data

Keep reading

1. Data analysis

All data is all the rage right now. (HBR named data science the sexiest career of the century.) This career can take many forms. Some data analysts know programming languages ​​(like R or SAS). But data analysis can happen in many ways.

Much of the data analysis is based on the use of tools such as Microsoft Excel and even Google Analytics. Get familiar with these tools and use them to collect and study data on personal projects like your blog or social media to see if it's something you enjoy. (Hint: if you enjoyed math / statistics in school, you will probably enjoy data analysis.)

2. Software testing

This job involves running programs through a variety of tests to detect errors and determine if the software meets specifications or requirements. Some software tests are automated, but there is still a lot of value in hiring people to test them manually - machines can't measure how pleasant the user experience is, only real users can!

Testers need to be able to work with developers and explain what parts of the program worked and didn't work for them, but they don't necessarily need to be well versed in programming terminology.

3. Technical support

You know what it is: helping people use software, answer questions, operate phones. Technical support can be internal (within a large organization, helping co-workers) or external (helping customers). In many cases, soft skills like communication and troubleshooting are much more important to technical support specialists than solid technical knowledge, and you probably won't run into situations where you need to know JavaScript or Python.

4. Rapid prototyping

This subspecialization in the UX / UI field has to do with fast wireframing applications. It can be as simple as a quick sketch or as complex as a full prototype - the point is to have several design options for a website or app idea, and incorporate feedback to refine the final product.

Rapid prototypers will typically receive input from the rest of your team - developers, stakeholders, testers, etc., as well as from the users for whom the product is being built.

5. Mastering Adobe Products

Tools like Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign let you design websites, create blog and social media graphics, and more.

Knowledge of these programs is primarily desired in design roles (and ideally you'll be more or less proficient if you are an aspiring designer). However, these skills can help you and increase your appeal in other fields as well, such as marketing and even copywriting. (For example, being able to make good graphics to accompany your blog post).

6. Search engine optimization (SEO)

SEO helps websites rank higher on search result pages. Best practices in SEO are constantly changing - what worked a few years ago is certainly not true today. A person with SEO knowledge keeps abreast of the latest trends.

SEO falls primarily under the umbrella of marketing. But it is also a useful skill for web designers / developers, as well as those who write on the web. Making your website or writing SEO friendly can increase traffic and give you more exposure online.

There are more technical aspects of SEO, which can involve getting your website files dirty. There's a lot of data in SEO too, so using some data analysis skills from point one can be helpful. On the completely non-technical side, there's content creation - writing SEO-friendly web content or articles.

7. A / B testing

Also known as split testing, A / B testing essentially consists of testing two different versions of the same web page (

TO

and "B"), and see which one performs better (gets more button clicks, collects more emails, generates more sales, etc.).

A / B testing is also part of marketing. Knowing how to code can help, but is not required.

8. Growth Hacking

Don't let the

to hack

In part, you get confused: growth hacking is an emerging marketing technique that focuses on acquiring users quickly. It's about problem solving and combines digital marketing with web analytics.

Essentially, growth hackers combine some of the above skills (SEO, A / B testing, analytics) with social media and viral advertising in an effort to grow their business quickly while keeping costs low. Knowing how to code can help, but is not required.

9. Technical writing

Ser capaz de escribir sobre tecnologías complejas de una manera que la gente común pueda entender es una habilidad valiosa. La redacción técnica puede tomar la forma de crear instrucciones y documentación, o puede significar redactar un comunicado de prensa que describa un nuevo producto que la empresa está lanzando. Esto es para la persona que puede comprender la tecnología y comunicarse de manera efectiva por escrito. ¡Dos dones para tener, poderosos cuando se combinan!

10. Metodología ágil

Agile es una metodología de gestión de proyectos destinada a ayudar a los equipos a lidiar de manera eficiente con situaciones impredecibles. Normalmente se encuentra en el desarrollo de software (por ejemplo, Scrum), pero ahora muchas otras industrias utilizan la metodología. En realidad, hay trabajos completos basados ​​en esto, como un Scrum Coach, donde el salario medio anual en los Estados Unidos es de $ 96,000.

The technology industry is enormous, and it has room for all different kinds of personalities and skillsets. So even if you’ve never written a single line of code in your life, don’t assume that tech is not for you. Start experimenting with some of these skills; you never know where it might take you.

Other Guides:


GET SPECIAL OFFER FROM OUR PARTNER.