How easy is it, as a professional project manager, to find a job in the US?

Updated on : January 21, 2022 by Kathleen Gilbert



How easy is it, as a professional project manager, to find a job in the US?

Product management has been on a roll for a while now. Attractive candidates should have absolutely no problem landing product management interviews, although getting a job is somewhat more complicated than other professions in my opinion.

Successfully landing a product management job usually involves shooting all the cylinders. The skills and knowledge that PMs need to demonstrate are typically contradictory skills, in the sense that people who are usually good at skill A are almost certainly poor at skill B. Getting a PM job means having a somewhat paradoxical skill set at times.

It is difficult to prepare for PM positions as there is no way to study to be smart and charismatic. The best way to get a good PM job is to be a genuine, balanced good person. Being a good person sounds easy, but it's shocking how endless it is for most people.

Greetings! 19 Answers so far, and I agree with all of them. Yes, a PMP certification is indeed "worth it". And no, it's not worth it, as one responder pointed out: PMP certified people are worth nothing. So do you know where the true value of the PMP lies? It is worth it, or the futility rests solely with you. What you really do with it.

For me, the rigors of studying for the PMP exposed me to a rich set of tools that I would not have otherwise learned. I'm not saying that knowledge isn't available, it is! But the dilemma of humanity now is too much information. How does it filter through the bright neon signs?

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Greetings! 19 Answers so far, and I agree with all of them. Yes, a PMP certification is indeed "worth it". And no, it's not worth it, as one responder pointed out: PMP certified people are worth nothing. So do you know where the true value of the PMP lies? It is worth it, or the futility rests solely with you. What you really do with it.

For me, the rigors of studying for the PMP exposed me to a rich set of tools that I would not have otherwise learned. I'm not saying that knowledge isn't available, it is! But the dilemma of humanity now is too much information. How do you sift through the bright neon signs everywhere to find what is truly valuable? PMI has made the entire knowledge base available through a rigorous review process, leaving only the most valuable nuggets for anyone and everyone who is willing to accept them. Basically, they gave us the Pareto principle (the 80-20 rule), giving us that 20% that really makes a difference. I am fortunate to be able to get back to PMI's hard work and enjoy the best, as defined by PMI.

Just having that piece of paper means nothing. Many employers know this. Some people seem to naturally know how to lead successful projects, with stellar results, without certifications. Others with PMP, Six Sigma, Prince, and any other certification produce mediocre results, even failures. PMI doesn't tell you "how" to run a project, it just gives you the framework. They can not. Every project is different. It depends on your diligence, your ingenuity, your pursuit of continuous improvement that makes the difference. Bottom line: I say do it! I have never regretted for a second what I had to go through to get my certification!

Sadly, he is a true Catch-22 when it comes to landing a job in this industry. Companies won't hire you because you don't have any real-world experience and you can't get any real-world experience because you can't be hired.

Basically it all comes down to who you know. I recommend starting to visit very frequent places like LinkedIn and even here and start posting frequently, getting your name out there, and most importantly, making sure the information you post is accurate! If you post inaccurate information, any potential employer will blacklist your name.

Also, make sure you have your face

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Sadly, he is a true Catch-22 when it comes to landing a job in this industry. Companies won't hire you because you don't have any real-world experience and you can't get any real-world experience because you can't be hired.

Basically it all comes down to who you know. I recommend starting to visit very frequent places like LinkedIn and even here and start posting frequently, getting your name out there, and most importantly, making sure the information you post is accurate! If you post inaccurate information, any potential employer will blacklist your name.

Also, make sure your Facebook settings are locked. Your potential employers are going to Google you and if you come up with photos of drunk and partying, they won't hire you. So do yourself a favor and close your Facebook. If you need help with that, here's how: Learn how to block Facebook security and privacy settings

If you are currently working, especially in a corporate environment, see if you can get some observation time with the network engineer at the company you work for. That is what I did. I expressed interest and it got the attention of someone hired. They saw it as a benefit because with very little work and cost on their part, they were able to get additional bandwidth when they needed it, without having to pay for a new person at the company. The benefit for me is that I am now getting a real world experience.

Finally, see if you can get an internship or do some volunteer work with a local business. The school district can be a good place to look. Anything where you can get a real world experience. It may be shit not to get paid, but the payoff in the end will be good.

The best way to become a project manager is like any other profession. It's not just getting a certification or degree from a college or university (although that helps) but practicing and having a passion for it. The best engineers, musicians, artists, etc. They may or may not have a degree, but they all have something in common with each other and those "things" are passion and practice, and a lot. I know the people at PMI don't like what I say, but the truth is that sometimes a 16-year-old is a much better software engineer than a college graduate. Why? For the passion that burns within 16 years

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The best way to become a project manager is like any other profession. It's not just getting a certification or degree from a college or university (although that helps) but practicing and having a passion for it. The best engineers, musicians, artists, etc. They may or may not have a degree, but they all have something in common with each other and those "things" are passion and practice, and a lot. I know the people at PMI don't like what I'm saying, but the truth is that sometimes a 16-year-old is a much better software engineer than a college graduate. Why? For the passion that burns within 16 years and the long hours of practice that passion made possible. Getting a title doesn't have the same effect as the two mentioned above. When all three (passion, practice and education) are combined,

If you are working and have no project management experience, apply to become an observer on a project managed by a project manager you know is good and start learning by doing. Read case studies on project management and understand the area you want to practice as a project manager. It is important to have a degree of proficiency in the area you want to practice. If software project management is your passion, learn all you can about software, if marketing is your passion, learn about business and marketing.

Hiring decisions are the most important decisions of a manager. It doesn't matter if you are looking for a permanent placement or a contractor, you don't want to make the wrong decision here.

So the first question to ask yourself is: how good is my company (and how good am I as a manager) at hiring great people?

Be honest about your capabilities - If you have no hiring experience, if your HR team is too small, if you regret your last three staffing decisions, or if you only receive very few applications in total, you should consider outside help. .

Get in touch with recruitment agencies specialized in and

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Hiring decisions are the most important decisions of a manager. It doesn't matter if you are looking for a permanent placement or a contractor, you don't want to make the wrong decision here.

So the first question to ask yourself is: how good is my company (and how good am I as a manager) at hiring great people?

Be honest about your capabilities - If you have no hiring experience, if your HR team is too small, if you regret your last three staffing decisions, or if you only receive very few applications in total, you should consider outside help. .

Get in touch with specialized recruiting agencies in your industry that focus on contractors or permanent roles (larger recruiters like Hays have candidates in both areas). Let them know what you are looking for and they will take care of all the confusing details: creating professional ads, collecting profiles and matching them, finding candidates for Skype interviews, and preparing both parties for the F2F interview. In the end, they greatly reduce complexity and are worth the money.

Note: in large companies, this decision is usually made by you. They have a defined set of partners to hire and you can't get around that (regardless of the perceived quality of the candidates).

If you decide to recruit on your own, you must go through all the recruiting steps on your own, respectively, that your HR team has. So you work with them, write your requirements, create a job advertisement and post it on the platform.

I would advise advertising on all the major platforms in your country or area. For example, in Europe we are talking about Monster, Stepstone, Indeed, Reed, etc.

Social networks like LinkedIn (and XING in Europe) are great for increasing your advertising reach, but I wouldn't recommend relying solely on them.

However, if you can afford it, you should also tune out with your search. A large part of the hiring process actually begins offline at the local or regional newspaper, and not on the online portals. Therefore, you should also run some advertisements in the newspapers.

I'd like to go back to recruitment agencies here - even if you decide NOT to use them for recruiting, they also offer recruitment consulting. Working with your HR management, they will help you set up your company's custom recruiting strategy and hiring process.

How?

You send CVs by the thousands, or even better by the tens of thousands, to each and every one of the companies that you can think of.

He will take you NOWHERE.

No company will hire from outside their own country.

Should you even bother?

The US economy IS SHRINKING at an annual rate of 30.3%.

The Canadian economy is not much better.

Americans have made it very clear what they think of immigrants of all kinds. Rad this.

The Trump administration also doesn't like highly-skilled immigrants

And no country can accept many immigrants in the future.

So in short, forget about finding ANY job in the US or Canada, or

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How?

You send CVs by the thousands, or even better by the tens of thousands, to each and every one of the companies that you can think of.

He will take you NOWHERE.

No company will hire from outside their own country.

Should you even bother?

The US economy IS SHRINKING at an annual rate of 30.3%.

The Canadian economy is not much better.

Americans have made it very clear what they think of immigrants of all kinds. Rad this.

The Trump administration also doesn't like highly-skilled immigrants

And no country can accept many immigrants in the future.

So in short, forget about finding ANY job in the US or Canada, or even immigrating there.

Canadian immigration is now, for all practical purposes, STOPPED.

Thanks for the A2A.

In my experience, the only ones that allow full telework have these 3 traits in common:

  • In the financial insurance (large banks) and health industries.
  • Their software developers are spread across the world or in the US, and there are few to no members of the development team who reside locally.
  • Every now and then, maybe monthly, maybe quarterly, it is required to fly to the corporate office for a couple of days a week.

To be successful in these roles, you generally must:

  • For the health ones, know / become familiar with HIPAA and ACA.
  • For the financial PCI and SOX.
  • Excellent comunication
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Thanks for the A2A.

In my experience, the only ones that allow full telework have these 3 traits in common:

  • In the financial insurance (large banks) and health industries.
  • Their software developers are spread across the world or in the US, and there are few to no members of the development team who reside locally.
  • Every now and then, maybe monthly, maybe quarterly, it is required to fly to the corporate office for a couple of days a week.

To be successful in these roles, you generally must:

  • For the health ones, know / become familiar with HIPAA and ACA.
  • For the financial PCI and SOX.
  • Excellent communication skills. This is the bread and butter for all PM. Being at a distance requires greater communication skills to reduce the possibility of miscommunication and misunderstandings.

Also in exchange for telecommuting privileges, the job can pay below market or at least below the average rate for non-telecommuting jobs. If you already have strong industry / sector experience for the particular job, you may be able to advocate for a higher salary.

I wish you the best of luck in your search.

If you think someone will give you an idea that will be very successful, don't you think it has already been tested? The business is always 1% idea and 99% execution of that idea. Sometimes the little ideas that a person who has great potential wields will turn into big ones.
If you think you have that potential in you, make friends ... Or learn and keep growing, take minimal risk and once you think you are ready, give it a try.

All the best for your future.

It largely depends on many core factors such as whether you work in Delhi NCR or the southern part of India, whether you are in a service company or a product company.

For example, project managers in Bangalore, Chennai and Hyderabad earn 20-25% more than their counterparts in Gurgaon or Noida due to the fact that there are more IT companies in our southern part and the quality of the projects they manage.

This fact is true for 80% of the cases.

It also depends on whether you have the PMP certification, you are Btech from the IIT

An average starting salary for a project manager starts from 10 lakhs and I see that

Keep reading

It largely depends on many core factors such as whether you work in Delhi NCR or the southern part of India, whether you are in a service company or a product company.

For example, project managers in Bangalore, Chennai and Hyderabad earn 20-25% more than their counterparts in Gurgaon or Noida due to the fact that there are more IT companies in our southern part and the quality of the projects they manage.

This fact is true for 80% of the cases.

It also depends on whether you have the PMP certification, you are Btech from the IIT

In an average starting salary for a project manager it starts at 10 lakhs and I see senior project manager earning 20-22 lakhs also at RBS, sapient, Deloitte and 25 lakhs at Adobe, cadence, Samsung (product companies)

The maximum population of project managers is between 13 and 15 lakhs.

If you have the relevant skills and show that you can execute a project well, you will easily land a job. On the other hand, immigration is difficult. You may find a job easily, but getting immigration to work in the US is going to be difficult depending on your citizenship.

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