How does it feel to quit your job?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Layla Patel



How does it feel to quit your job?

Perhaps I should write an answer for What Life Lessons Have People Learned By Leaving Their First Real Job ?, first, although I will summarize my answer as follows:

You may feel one of many different things, depending on why you are quitting, what your environment is like, who you are, and what your level of maturity is when it comes to dealing with drastic changes around you.

More on that below.

Leave work n. 1:

Leaving my first job was very difficult. When I started my first job, I was so in love with him that I felt like I would retire there. The first years were fabulous, each year I sent what

Keep reading

Perhaps I should write an answer for What Life Lessons Have People Learned By Leaving Their First Real Job ?, first, although I will summarize my answer as follows:

You may feel one of many different things, depending on why you are quitting, what your environment is like, who you are, and what your level of maturity is when it comes to dealing with drastic changes around you.

More on that below.

Leave work n. 1:

Leaving my first job was very difficult. When I started my first job, I was so in love with him that I felt like I would retire there. The first few years were fabulous, each year it shipped truly innovative technology. I was beyond my years with regard to responsibility and working through difficult unsolved problems trying to build certain classes of distributed systems.

However, after 4 years or more, my company was much more successful, much bigger, and much slower, and even though I didn't really realize it, I was exhausted.

Unlike the groundbreaking problems he was solving before, he was troubleshooting errors effectively and just like any other engineer working in a mature organization where the ratio of time spent correcting errors / milking the cash cow versus the innovation just wasn't there to make me a tick.

At the same time, I tried very hard to convince myself that I was "still in love" with my work; I was used to saying that to people I interviewed honestly, and sometime along the way I realized that I was saying it out of habit to make sure I was selling my company to people instead of being serious.

I was also very close to my boss, in addition to being my mentor, he had also become a very close personal friend. One day, he came up to me and said he was going to quit, and it was clear to me that my time had come. To make matters worse, I still liked many of my co-workers very much and I was left wondering if I was doing the right thing by quitting.

So, as described in some of the answers above, quitting my first job was painful and uncomfortable as someone mentioned above.

Leave work n. 2:

Leaving my second job was much easier on an emotional level, although much more difficult on a professional level. I was at a startup leading the development of the caching and storage layer of a video transcoding product.

In part, I was chosen for the position because no one knew much about the details of storage backends and how enterprise storage file servers work, especially considering that my own suggestion was to use my previous employer's storage box. .

At the same time, my own work on the project had roughly finished what I had been working on for 3 years.

My boss had talked about my changing projects and becoming a role where I went from what I was doing to leading a low-level kernel networking project where he expected me to just design and lead rather than code.

Around this time, one of my former co-workers approached me to do something different.

In the second case, I did not feel because I had been unhappy doing what I had been doing, it was just that my instincts were more in tune to recognize that what I would be doing in the future might not be my thing.

In this case, it was much more professional and balanced, and I was busy working until 6 p.m., the last official work day I had.

My advice is basically to constantly evaluate whether the invariants that led you to like your current job are true or not, and use them as a guiding factor.

If you stick around longer and force yourself to like your job when you don't like it anymore, you'll be uncomfortable. If you are sensible and mindful to recognize when is the right time to quit smoking, it can seem pretty straightforward.

See also:
Jobs and Careers: When Do You Know It's Time to Quit Your Job?

Today I quit my job. I am experiencing this right now.

According to Brazilian labor laws, employees and employers must give 30 days advance notice before resigning or firing. Companies may or may not exempt you from these 30 days of work when you resign. If they don't and you don't want to stay any longer, you have to pay a month's salary to the company.

So today I deliver my 30 day notice. I already told my bosses yesterday, and they almost begged me to stay 2 more weeks and deliver my notice later (sorry I won't). Because they need me, of course they won't exempt me from the 30 days, and I

Keep reading

Today I quit my job. I am experiencing this right now.

According to Brazilian labor laws, employees and employers must give 30 days advance notice before resigning or firing. Companies may or may not exempt you from these 30 days of work when you resign. If they don't and you don't want to stay any longer, you have to pay a month's salary to the company.

So today I deliver my 30 day notice. I already told my bosses yesterday, and they almost begged me to stay 2 more weeks and deliver my notice later (sorry I won't). Because they need me, of course they will not exempt me from the 30 days, and I will work normally during this time (mainly because I need the money).

How does it feel? Well, it feels like you're in control, it feels like freedom, and it feels like a broken relationship, as everyone has already said. One of the parties will not be happy and will feel betrayed at first. But it is a professional relationship, and professional people will eventually pick up on that. It is not personal. I told my bosses that they can count on me after I leave and that they can call me if they need help. If I got fired, no company would be as nice as that, so I feel like I'm being VERY nice. The bosses seemed concerned yesterday, but now they probably have a plan and could finally congratulate me (I'm moving to the US to get a master's degree).

I don't like my job, so I feel a mixture of excitement, fear (what if it doesn't work and I'm stuck in Brazil, unemployed?) And relief. The next 30 days will fly by, I have a lot to teach and delegate. And this job that I hated so much no longer seems so thankless to me. There will probably be good memories.

It's the second time I've quit a job and the feeling was the same the last time. At the end of the day, today, I will breathe a sigh of relief. And in 30 days, I will get my life and time back to finally enjoy the city I live in.

Four years ago, I quit my first job. It scared the hell out of me. I had grudgingly accepted the fact that a comfortable position and associating with people like me was not helping me grow.

I made a mental list of all the things I was familiar with: a steady salary, bosses I really liked, an exceptional social life (oh, the chaos of having waiters as roommates), and family and friends close at hand. . I realized that I had literally lived in a playground of comfort and convenience my entire life, in and around New York City. So I crumpled my lis

Keep reading

Four years ago, I quit my first job. It scared the hell out of me. I had grudgingly accepted the fact that a comfortable position and associating with people like me was not helping me grow.

I made a mental list of all the things I was familiar with: a steady salary, bosses I really liked, an exceptional social life (oh, the chaos of having waiters as roommates), and family and friends close at hand. . I realized that I had literally lived in a playground of comfort and convenience my entire life, in and around New York City. So I crumpled up my list and dared to throw it away.

I searched for the continent I was least aware of, found a country I had never considered, and shortly after my 26th birthday, I went to Tanzania with a one-way ticket. Six months and 14 countries later, I had seen, done, challenged, loved, feared and learned more than ever in the twenty-six years of my life. The world had shown me something amazing and I knew that experience was something I needed to share.

Four years later, I quit my job again. This time with a little more knowledge of life and a lot more purpose. For the past two months, I have been blogging from the road and documenting the people and experiences that have kept the journey fascinating. The goal is to share the lessons that can be learned along the way - self-reliance, compassion, communication, and a plethora of other good things - through personal stories and the wisdom of travelers I meet.

So in short, quitting your job can be the most empowering life change you can create for yourself, if you move with a purpose and a desire to become a better version of yourself.

-thepointsinbetween.com

Step 1: Answer many questionnaires online, looking for sudden enlightenment.

It all started with a questionnaire, several of them. Week after week, I would go on Google and search "how to know it's time to quit your job." I would write it like this, a complete sentence, wanting to do my question full justice. The first results were always questionnaires:

  • Is your boss a horrible person?
  • Would you hate having your boss's job?
  • Are you badly paid?
  • Do you wake up every morning dreading going to the office?

I did them all. I never got a 10 out of 10. No, I didn't totally hate my job. No, I was not afraid to enter

Keep reading

Step 1: Answer many questionnaires online, looking for sudden enlightenment.

It all started with a questionnaire, several of them. Week after week, I would go on Google and search "how to know it's time to quit your job." I would write it like this, a complete sentence, wanting to do my question full justice. The first results were always questionnaires:

  • Is your boss a horrible person?
  • Would you hate having your boss's job?
  • Are you badly paid?
  • Do you wake up every morning dreading going to the office?

I did them all. I never got a 10 out of 10. No, I didn't totally hate my job. No, he was not afraid to go to the office every morning. My boss was not a horrible person. And, as the head of public relations for all of Google, I'd say I was overpaid, not underpaid.

But he was unhappy. I had reached the top of my profession, but the truth was that I had more and more doubts about the content of this supposed dream job. And after all those years of wondering what it would be like to run things, I realized that having the big office meant you were on one side of the glass while all the people who had once been your friends were on the other side. It was more lonely than fun.

And so, I ran into the ridiculous practice of asking Google if it should quit Google. Every few weeks, I would try a different quiz, thinking that it would provide a new perspective or that my score would gradually increase. It took several months before I came to the real conclusion: it didn't matter what my score was. The motivation to carry out these questionnaires was the answer itself. It was time to quit my job.

Steps 2-49: Even though you may have noticed, don't give up. Try to be happier in your work.

Take a walk in the morning. Eat more sugar. Eat less sugar. Use those free massage credits (did I mention I worked in tech?). Avoid the executive who thought he was a bully. Confront the executive who thought you were a bully. Spend more time meeting with reporters - horrible idea - spending less time meeting with reporters. Delegate more. Try to worry less. Try to worry more.

None of this worked for me. But it could be for you.

Steps 50–690: Wait for divine intervention.

I'm not generally into spells, incantations, or the idea that there are work fairies lining up in one's career, ready to lend a hand. But when it came to quitting my job, it seemed totally reasonable to somehow expect the universe to come together on my behalf to determine my next step.

If I just waited, surely my life purpose would be revealed to me. I would wake up one morning and realize that my true calling was to arrange flower arrangements, start a business, or become a park ranger. Or if not any of those, at least the universe would listen to me and put an exciting job opportunity in front of me. After all, he had random headhunter and LinkedIn job openings every week; It seemed very plausible that one day something amazing would appear in my inbox. Maybe some publisher would come out of the woods and buy the book I'd written years before, or maybe my next opportunity would materialize when I was at the local coffee shop, where The Youth often speaks out loud about their vegan crypto projects.

He was open to anything. I just wanted a sign, with flashing lights and neon, in front of me. Guess what? The universe was silent. Because obviously, whether in the world of work or the fledgling vegan crypto industry, if you want something to happen, you often have to do it yourself.

Steps 691–740: Read women's magazines and learn quick-cook recipes to accompany you throughout the week.

I finally realized that it was my responsibility to figure out my next steps. I needed inspiration, so I picked up a bunch of magazines aimed at women of a certain age: More, Women's Day, Real Simple. These are the magazines that spend little time telling you about your current lipstick color and instead assume that you are an asexual void who lives to tend to your children and organize your spice rack. They were also full of stories of women who quit their jobs and went on to do great things.

The story arc was quite similar from one story to the next:

Leslie had reached a point in her career as an account executive / mid-level banker / small business marketer when she realized she needed to make a change. The next day, while sucking on her guts to fit her skirt, she had an idea: why can't women wear even tighter underwear to lose weight? Why can't they get salon-quality waxing for a fraction of the price? What prevents them from having better organized closets? So Leslie took a leap of faith. It was tough and he almost gave up, but today Leslie has a successful closet organizing business.

I just couldn't relate. I didn't have a brilliant idea. My closet was a mess and always will be. All he knew was that he no longer wanted to do what he was doing.

Step 741: Explore your options and watch them evaporate before your eyes.

Thinking I was taking the bull by the horns, I agreed to go on a job interview for a trendy car company.

"Why do you like Car Company"?

“To be honest, I hate cars. I find them really boring. "

"Uh, so ... why would you be interested in this job?"

"Well, I think if someone was going to make me like cars a little more, it could be your company."

"We should probably hire someone who likes cars."

Steps 742–746: Face your fears by asking someone else what they are.

Next, I turned to a life coach. (Yes, once again I was trying to get someone else to figure it out for me.)

"I'm afraid to quit," I told him. “What am I without my job? All I do is work. That is all I am. What if I quit and my life is empty? "

The coach told me to write down what it would be like if I quit my job. What was the worst that could happen? What was the most likely to happen?

So I wrote it. Lo and behold, despite how I felt inside, there was no apocalypse. Even in the worst case, the Earth kept spinning. I could always get another job; He had been working for a long time and had skills that were in demand.

I decided to tell some people that I was going to quit smoking, the idea was to make myself more responsible for my decision, as one would with a diet or a New Years resolution.

Steps 747–760: Tell people your goals at inopportune times.

Inspired by my coach, I decided to tell some people that I was going to quit smoking, the idea was to take more responsibility for my decision, as one would with a diet or a New Years resolution. I didn't normally do this in a very neat way:

"I'm quitting," I told a co-worker. "I don't know when, but by the time I'm 40 sure." My co-worker's jaw dropped. He didn't say anything, so I kept talking. “By the way, I am pregnant. Also, did you finish your staff projections for next year? "

That was a bit awkward, so next time I tried a more concrete approach.

"I'm going to quit smoking," I told a friend.

"What are you going to do?"

"I don't know. Maybe open an Etsy shop to sell small knitted animals?"

"Can you knit?"

"That's not the point!"

Step 763: Solve the real problem: your big fat ego (for example).

When I was a manager, employees used to come to my office and spend 25 minutes dancing on all kinds of topics related to their promotion or career. For most of us, it is not easy to talk to our managers about what we really want. At some point, he would stop them and ask them what was most important to them: money? Promotion and recognition? The content of the job?

People are not driven by the same things, and many of us have a hard time being honest with ourselves or with others when our priorities are more materialistic or driven by ego. But for the purpose of this 837-step plan, you must put aside the little voice that criticizes or questions what you want. (Later, after you quit your job, you can go on a meditation retreat that will make you less egotistical or materialistic. That's like a 2000-step plan, and it's not what we're here to solve right now.)

Once you can clearly identify what matters to you, it will be much easier to solve your problem. At the end of the day, it's not that different from writing a business plan at work. I need x and I will do y to get there.

Despite all my supposed managerial prowess, it took me a long time to follow the advice that I had been giving my own employees for years. In my case, I wanted to cut down on my 90 minute commute and not have to clean up other people's messes (a big part of any PR job). I just wanted to deal with messes that I had created myself.

That's when everything fell into place: I needed to resolve to have more control.

Step 764-836: Drop off a cliff, gently.

If I had identified money or prestige as my key driver, I could have explored options at other tech companies or a similar position in a new industry. But that would only have led my existing problem to a new job. I had realized that I wanted to be a one-woman show of something. She didn't know what that was, which was probably part of the reason why she had been paralyzed for so long. So what I needed wasn't necessarily a new job; it was something that would help me discover what interested me.

So I applied to graduate school, and when I got in, I paid the $ 100 deposit. Did you know if I would finish graduate school or what would come of it? No. But it allowed me to jump right into something else, something totally different that would allow for a little comparison to my previous life and also give me total control over my daily goals.

I did all of this at 39. I couldn't have afforded that opportunity in my 20s, and of course many people my age cannot afford to take time off to figure out their next steps. The point of my advice is not to say that you should take a year off and go to graduate school or go to an ashram in India (although if that works for you, great).

Once the deposit was paid, it was easy to give my notice.

Rather, it is to say that if you hold on a little more, fearful of what will happen next, find something that will compel you to take the next step. Sign up for something that will be difficult for you to get out of. That could be taking an evening class, conducting informational interviews to learn more about a particular field, or doing some volunteer work in an area that interests you. Make a small commitment that is easy for you to make right now, but difficult to reverse later.

Once the deposit was paid, it was easy to give my notice. He knew what he was doing next and he knew what he was solving. I was not solving all the existential problems of my work, I was heading towards discovering what I wanted to do.

(Side note for stakeholders: During the year after I left Google, I went back to school, ended up starting a business, had a third child, stopped school to walk like a zombie through the newborn stage, and I published a book. Only the school part was on the move when I left, but none of the other four things probably would have happened if I had stayed at my job. Also, that was a crazy year; I'm usually not that productive.)

Step 837: Accept that your life is just a late-stage capitalist business plan.

When reading magazine profiles or listening to cocktail versions of the stories of people who quit smoking, it's easy to think that you should only quit your job if you have a very clear vision of your future or have been blessed with an idea of ​​a a million dollars. Because our own narrative doesn't feel that simple, we question our instincts, allowing fear of the unknown to push us to put off the things we know we want to do.

Instead, we would do well to accept the clutter of our process and dispassionately discover what is important to us at the most fundamental level, building a business plan for our life that gradually takes us from point A to point B.

There are some people who are born knowing exactly what they want to do or who are super relaxed about navigating the seas of changing from one wave to another. But those people never clicked on this article. But you did it. And you read to the end of this sentence. The question is why? What are you waiting for

It depends on the context of your life: what are your responsibilities, how will it affect your current personal and professional relationships, and what is your ambition?

This was my experience:

As a 24-year-old with no responsibilities, understanding parents, negligible savings in the bank account, and an ambitious desire to change the world, I quit my first job after graduating after 10 months in the middle of the recession (March 2009). When everyone was afraid of being fired, I felt giddy with excitement.

There are some common doubts:

  • What if he had continued down this path and climbed the ladder?
  • W
Keep reading

It depends on the context of your life: what are your responsibilities, how will it affect your current personal and professional relationships, and what is your ambition?

This was my experience:

As a 24-year-old with no responsibilities, understanding parents, negligible savings in the bank account, and an ambitious desire to change the world, I quit my first job after graduating after 10 months in the middle of the recession (March 2009). When everyone was afraid of being fired, I felt giddy with excitement.

There are some common doubts:

  • What if he had continued down this path and climbed the ladder?
  • What if I had stayed only 3 more months or had finished 2 or 5 years?
  • How will this look on my resume?
  • Am I good enough to be an entrepreneur?
  • Will people take me seriously?
  • Will I be able to motivate myself without anyone telling me what to do?


There are some personal problems you have in the back of your mind, but think of them unlikely: what if both my father and my brother lose their jobs? This ends up happening.

It was probably the sensation felt by the first people to travel across the oceans. Once they have left the coast, there is no going back and there is no telling what lies ahead. You know the chances are high that you will die in cold, rough and unforgiving seas, but the experience is worth it. And on the off chance that you make a discovery, your name will go down in history. So yes, I have experienced death once, but I know I want to go out to sea again (after recovering a bit).

I answered this on our site after getting a few questions in my own life, but this is what I have learned.

1. THE WORLD DOES NOT END

The sun still found its way out every morning. I imagined my entire network crumbling around me. People told me I was crazy, stupid and ungrateful. I thought that I would not know what to do with my time and my bank accounts would be emptied and Mina would leave me. Of course, none of those things happen. The world is a great place, full of opportunity, support, and love. If anything, quitting my job gave me the ability to appreciate it.

2. YOU SPEND MUCH LESS MONEY

T

Keep reading

I answered this on our site after getting a few questions in my own life, but this is what I have learned.

1. THE WORLD DOES NOT END

The sun still found its way out every morning. I imagined my entire network crumbling around me. People told me I was crazy, stupid and ungrateful. I thought that I would not know what to do with my time and my bank accounts would be emptied and Mina would leave me. Of course, none of those things happen. The world is a great place, full of opportunity, support, and love. If anything, quitting my job gave me the ability to appreciate it.

2. YOU SPEND MUCH LESS MONEY

This one surprised me. I took for granted how much money I spent every day during the workday. Traveling to the office? $$. Breakfast and coffee in the morning? $$. Lunch? $$. Coffee number 2? $$. Traveling home? You get the picture. Add in social activities (more like self-medicating) like after-work drinks, and you easily see thousands of dollars a month. At least I was. Today, I make most of my food and coffee at home, walk everywhere (usually within a 500m radius) and have completely stopped drinking. Having a lower monthly consumption rate is a good advantage for planning finances, especially now that they are not so predictable.

3. LEARN HOW TO WORK ON YOUR TERMS

My whole perception of what work is has changed. Before, work was what my superiors or clients directed me to do. "This is our product, go sell it." "These are your colleagues, be nice to them." "This is your client, don't call them an asshole." He was running, trying to please everyone and hoping to get a promotion or a raise. Today I am in full control. I work with clients that I like, I collect projects that I want to do, I work when it suits me. Today I slept until 11:00 AM and watched Silicon Valley on Crave TV until 4 PM. So I started working.

4. PEOPLE BEGIN TO OFFER YOU OPPORTUNITIES

At first, this bothered me a bit. Former colleagues and people in my network reached out and told me about the opportunities they knew about. I felt like they thought I was struggling for a job and needed help, which wasn't necessarily true. I was doing just fine as a freelancer and I was going to be fine, damn it! Now, I realize how wonderful it is to have a network of people willing to help you. These same people have presented me with new opportunities and projects that I would not otherwise have known about, and it is a beautiful thing.

5. TIME. OH MY GOD, MUCH MORE TIME

This alone is worth it. We do not realize how much time we lose for our jobs. 40-60 hours a week, we only give away for the safety of a job. I still spend a lot of my time working, but it's on my terms, and this flexibility gives me time that I didn't have before to dive into the things that are really important.

Quitting your job may not be the answer for you, but if it's something you've considered, understand that it's not the end of the world. It's a big world out there, with many options and opportunities, and taking a step into it can really bring you closer to who you want to be.

It's not a great inspiring story. Not a brave decision.

I was a low scoring student in college. After some rejections, I unexpectedly got a job. After a few months, I was working for a large multinational with a large CTC. I created a good life for myself there. The workload was less and I had a lot of free time to write and explore my other hobbies. It sounds like a dream come true and it was.

But after a year, everything became too repetitive. I wasn't even working 5% of my potential. So I started to think about what exactly I wanted to be after 10 years and it was definitely not working out for some multinationals.

I have a

Keep reading

It's not a great inspiring story. Not a brave decision.

I was a low scoring student in college. After some rejections, I unexpectedly got a job. After a few months, I was working for a large multinational with a large CTC. I created a good life for myself there. The workload was less and I had a lot of free time to write and explore my other hobbies. It sounds like a dream come true and it was.

But after a year, everything became too repetitive. I wasn't even working 5% of my potential. So I started to think about what exactly I wanted to be after 10 years and it was definitely not working out for some multinationals.

I have a dream. In this dream, I have a son and I spend a lot of time with him / her. I am giving my family more than enough time. I travel a lot with them and have a good life. Now how can I achieve that? Definitely not with work. So I decided to go into my own business. I don't want to be a billionaire, I just want enough without working day and night. I see people working their entire lives for their family without spending time with them.

After I started thinking, it took me 2 months to write the resignation letter. After another 5 hours to click the 'Submit' button. The moment I clicked the button, I had the most beautiful feeling of freedom. I swear I've never been so free before. Endless possibilities, little fear but free. Actually, he didn't know he was caged in the first place. After giving up, I went to the Himalayas to hike. Then a few days in Goa. And he moved to Pune to find out the rest.

I'm still trying to figure it out. Lately under a lot of stress. But something will come up. If nothing comes up, I can always go back to my cage.

A few months ago I wrote this answer: Erica Lynn's answer to What was your greatest achievement last week?

A lot has changed since then.

My job basically consisted of two tasks: creating profiles of potential donors and making thank you calls to donors.

Donor profiles always challenged me for some reason. They had to format them in a specific way and if they weren't correct, you had to fix them. I'm pretty detail-oriented, but I was never able to fully master profiles like my co-workers did. Whenever I was wrong, I felt bad about my skills as an employee.

In addition to the formattin

Keep reading

A few months ago I wrote this answer: Erica Lynn's answer to What was your greatest achievement last week?

A lot has changed since then.

My job basically consisted of two tasks: creating profiles of potential donors and making thank you calls to donors.

Donor profiles always challenged me for some reason. They had to format them in a specific way and if they weren't correct, you had to fix them. I'm pretty detail-oriented, but I was never able to fully master profiles like my co-workers did. Whenever I was wrong, I felt bad about my skills as an employee.

In addition to formatting the profiles, finding the information was also presented as a challenge. I had to use the BeenVerified and Premium White Pages websites, but the information on both platforms never seemed to match. It was a constant battle to figure out which source was more accurate.

Making donor appreciation calls was the other task I had to complete. Most of the time, my calls went directly to messages, which made sense. I wouldn't answer the phone if a random number called me and neither would most people. My coworkers had to do this too, but the database query never changed after I finished making the calls.


Shortly after starting work, I realized that this job was not for me. I was so desperate for work that when I took this position, I didn't notice what kind of job it was.

This affected my overall performance. I didn't have the motivation to work, but I had to or I would have been fired. Every day I just did the movements without feeling anything. I felt like a zombie. A few times as I left the office, tears fell silently from my face.

My family realized a bit of my true feelings about my work. Whenever they asked me how work was, I didn't say much. My general calm on the subject made them realize that something was wrong.

Once December rolled around, I knew I was going to quit smoking. Before officially resigning, I wanted to have another secured job, so I started applying for more positions on campus.

However, I was never able to quit because the department beat me too.

I received an email from the recruiting coordinator stating that they were letting me go. My bosses weren't sure if they would be working in person that much next semester, so they decided to reduce the number of students employed. As of December 16, he no longer officially worked for the Institutional Advancement. I wasn't upset that I was planning to leave anyway, but I was wondering if I was the only student employee they decided to fire.


After completing 2 unsuccessful job interviews (I was not hired for one of the positions and I have not received notification about the other), I applied for one more position.

I sent my resume and cover letter to the department head, but I wasn't expecting much. A few minutes later I received an email. The director was so happy that I applied that she wanted to schedule a Zoom interview with me that day.

About 40 minutes later, I had the interview. I really connected with the director; We agreed on so many different things. I even admired the way he carried me and how passionate he seemed. I had a good feeling that they were going to hire me.

I was right. I received the email confirming it today.

In January, I will be calculating my schedule and completing the training. And this time, I'm really excited. I will develop my skills in marketing, writing and web design. And the environment seems innovative and welcoming.

Maybe, just maybe, this is the opportunity I've always been waiting for.

-THE

At 39, and occasionally a traveling man, I left a few in my time for sure.

You can't really analyze how you feel without giving context to the situation. Many jobs are different and we leave them for different reasons.

Here's a general breakdown of the jobs I quit, the various reasons why, and how that affected my life. I'm picking and choosing because in my early days, there were some random jobs here and there that aren't all that noteworthy.

The first job I left was my first job that I took on after graduating from high school and moving to the largest city or

Keep reading

At 39, and occasionally a traveling man, I left a few in my time for sure.

You can't really analyze how you feel without giving context to the situation. Many jobs are different and we leave them for different reasons.

Here's a general breakdown of the jobs I quit, the various reasons why, and how that affected my life. I'm picking and choosing because in my early days, there were some random jobs here and there that aren't all that noteworthy.

The first job I quit was my first job that I took on after graduating from high school and moving to the larger city of Madison, WI. I just needed something to pay the bills.

And it should be noted, I quit the job before I even walked into the building for my first day.

Burger King


I was 18. I wasn't going to college. I had just moved to a different city. I needed to pay rent. So I went to the nearest opportunity, which was fast food. Namely the local Burger King.

I was hired on the spot after speaking with the manager. He walked me through the kitchen and various duties I would be undertaking. It was depressing to me, but I kept a smile on my face. He said that I could start in two days, on a Monday.

When Monday came around I came to my senses (with all due respect, it just wasn't for me) and didn't show up.

Best Buy


This place was like my college experience that I never had. I worked my way up from loss prevention to sales to department manager. I was 20 when I started.

It was the best of times and worst of times.

I had some girlfriends there. I met some of my best friends that later on were in my wedding party. And yes, I even met my wife there (she was a "pee on" part timer going to college). We had amazing parties after work. We played pool. We went sledding at midnight.

However, anyone that has worked in retail knows that the job kind of sucks. You're working a lot. You're dealing with pressure from the GM, DM, etc. You need to make numbers. You have to deal with some shitty customers. But I dealt with it and the thing was, I was kind of good at it... to a degree.

But it was no picnic.

I quit the job once to move onto another sales position (see next), but then years later when we moved to California to pursue my dream of screenwriting and working in Hollywood, I had to return to Best Buy to earn a paycheck while my wife finished graduate school. So it was another couple of years of hell. Great people and friends again, which was awesome. But the retail job sucked. You work the holiday season. No vacations around then.

Anyway, when my wife graduated, we were set to move closer to Hollywood. I was finally able to leave Best Buy.

So here's what I did.

As a prankster of sorts, on my last day, I wrote a bunch of notes on pieces of paper reading, "Ken Was Here" and preceded to hide them all over the store. Behind TV displays. In Sales Numbers notebooks. Everywhere. So people months to a year or more after I left, they'd be found.

When it was time to clock out, I got onto the intercom (during opening hours with customers abound) and said, "Attention Best Buy employees. I want to say thank you for the memories and that I'll always think of you when I wear my Dickies."

Laughter ensued until, from the intercom, I hear my GM's stern voice, "Ken, come to receiving please."

It was a great day. What could they do? Fire me?

It felt amazing because it was a moment that I had been waiting for. It marked a transition in my life that allowed me to pursue my dream of working in Hollywood.

Office Max


Now, this was in between my two Best Buy stores (Midwest and West Coast).

I had left my first Best Buy, disenchanted with the job. I was hired as a manager. However, the GM was an idiot. I was never trained. He was never really there. We never really had any meetings. I sold some furniture. I wasn't given the rate that I was promised. Life wasn't good.

So I wrote him a hand written resignation, left it in his almost always vacant office, and walked out never to return.

It was freeing at the time. Perhaps not the smartest move, but I was in my early 20s still.

Sony Pictures


Jump forward to my later 20s and into my 30s.

I was working as a studio liaison handling incoming film/TV productions, Sony executives, and term deals with production companies based on lot (I worked with Adam Sandler's crew a lot... played basketball with him).

I loved this job.

I later worked in development as a script reader/story analyst. I loved that job even more.

I loved studio life. I loved my golf cart. I loved being able to walk into almost any set I wanted. I loved seeing icons around me and seeing that they're just ordinary people (good, bad, and everything in between) in extraordinary jobs.

We soon had our first child in 2005. Life changed. We had no family in L.A. We couldn't afford the housing. My wife suggested I leave the studio to stay at home and focus on my own writing as I cared for our son. I still consulted with the studio and was still a script reader as well, so I hadn't really quit fully yet.

But then in 2006, after visiting family back home, I heard a voice in my head saying that it was time to go home.

In August 2006, I had given my due notice and found myself working a late night in my office at Sony. My last night.

I was alone. The studio was dark and near empty beyond security. I decided to take my golf cart for one last studio round. I drove all over the studio, sad. Studio life was the one major thing I was going to miss the most. I met idols like Harrison Ford and Arnold Schwarzenegger here. I played basketball with Adam Sandler. I talked at length with him about Chris Farley (he grew up in Wisconsin). I played with his dogs, the late Meatball and Matza. A year prior, I spotted my favorite director Steven Spielberg as he tipped his hat to me and drove by in a cart. I did and saw things that most people could only dream of.

I later packed up my things, shut the lights off, and walked to my car in my VIP North Thalberg lot where I parked. As I drove to the gate, I was in tears. I cried. And I cried hard.

It felt strange quitting the studio. The studio that I had worked so hard to get into. I didn't and don't regret it at all, but it's the studio life I still miss the most.

It was necessary to leave, but it didn't make it any easier. It was hard leaving that place.

Consultant with Quora Publishing


It's my last week as I write this. Some may or may not know that I've been consulting with Quora for some time now, but primarily within the last year under Quora Publishing.

This position was a prayer answered. I'm being fully honest here. I needed it. Not from a monetary standpoint (although it didn't hurt getting a steady paycheck as screenwriting gigs are few and far between), but having been on my own, away from the office and team setting that most around me were used to (9-5ers), while being a work-at-home dad/screenwriter for many years back here in Wisconsin, I needed something concrete. I needed to be a part of something where I could say "This is what I do" rather than "I'm a screenwriter but haven't had a gig in a awhile."

I was already a power user and top writer for Quora. And I was fascinated with the tech/startup industry. Had I been born a little later, I likely would have possibly migrated to the Silicon Valley.

Long story short, I was given an opportunity (many thanks to those that gave it to me) and was thrilled to be part of the Quora team... as a consultant at least.

I'm thankfully leaving on great terms with my team. It was more about me and much less about the job. And I signed an NDA so don't expect any juicy details here. Wink wink. There aren't any anyways. Another opportunity has come my way that I'm thrilled about. It will allow me to dip my toes back into the pulse of the industry that I've been involved with for so many years (film).

It's bittersweet, because it's the right decision, but I'll also miss my team and being a part of this amazing thing called Quora. Thankfully I can take full advantage of it as a user still.

So what's my point in all of this?


In life and in our careers, we're forced to make decisions. Some are hard (Sony, Quora) and some are easy (Burger King, Office Max, Best Buy). Regardless, you weigh the options. You look in the mirror and ask yourself if you're TRULY happy... and/or if you could be happier elsewhere.

So sometimes it feels great to quit a job. Other times it feels horrible. You celebrate. You mourn. You remember the good and try to forget the bad. But in the end you have to know that this is life. You're on a journey. Ups, downs, and all.

You just need to know when to stay and when to go. Trust yourself.

It's too often in life when we get into our comfort zones and become complacent despite all signs pointing you in a different direction. Listen to yourself. Listen to those you trust. Pay attention. And remember what happiness really is to you.

If you do all of that, each and every time you quit/leave a job, you'll feel mixed emotions but overall pretty good because you know that you're riding the wave(s) of life and life always takes you where you need to go if/when you truly are ready and willing to jump on that wave, no matter how scary it looks.

That's how it feels.

It doesn't feel like any one thing. It depends on you, on the job, on why you're quitting, on what relationships you have with your coworkers, and on what (if anything) you're planning to do afterwards.

Worst-case scenario: life's circumstances force you to quit a job you love. I haven't been through this, but I have friends who have. I would compare this to losing a loved one: there is a feeling of hopelessness and pain that takes a long time to go away and you kick yourself over and over again because you are sure you could have done something different to save the situation if you had only known

Keep reading

It doesn't feel like one thing. It depends on you, at work, why you are quitting, the relationships you have with your co-workers, and what you plan to do (if you have anything) next.

Worst case: You are forced by life circumstances to quit a job you love. I haven't gone through this myself but I have friends who have. I would liken this to losing a loved one: there is a sense of hopelessness and grief that takes a long time to go away and you kick yourself over and over because you're sure you could have done something differently to salvage the situation if only you'd known further ahead of time.

Best case: You leave a job you despise because a fabulous new opportunity has arisen. This is like winning the lottery. You revel in the thought that the annoying idiot down the hall won't be able to pester you any more, that the weekly status report you're writing to your domineering boss is the last formal contact you'll ever have with the blowhard, that you're about to be paid to do something interesting rather than sitting around all day doing pointless work. You have a broad grin on your face as you walk out the door.

Mostly it's somewhere in between, but varies along so many dimensions that it's really not possible to nail down to a single answer rather than a series of anecdotes heavily influenced by individual circumstance.

I took a year off from my career, after leaving a job that I hated. One of the smartest things I did.

I see some of the other answers here liken it to breaking up a relationship with a person you loved. It's nice to be passionate about your job, but never forget that your relationship with your employer is primarily a business relationship, not a personal one. You should never feel guilty or unfair if you decide that continuing to work for your employer is no longer in your interest and that you owe your managers or co-workers nothing more than to do a good job while you are employed.

Keep reading

I took a year off from my career, after leaving a job that I hated. One of the smartest things I did.

I see that some of the other answers here compare it to breaking off a relationship with a person you loved. It's nice to be passionate about your job, but never forget that your relationship with your employer is primarily a business relationship, not a personal one. You should never feel guilty or disloyal if you decide that continuing to work for your employer is no longer in your interest, and you don't owe your managers or coworkers anything more than doing a good job while you are employed and making things as easy for everyone as possible when you leave. If anyone feels betrayed or angry, that's unprofessional.

You should never make yourself emotionally dependent upon your job. It won't love you back.

Other Guides:


GET SPECIAL OFFER FROM OUR PARTNER.