How do you motivate yourself to work if you don't need the money?

Updated on : December 7, 2021 by Cheyenne French



How do you motivate yourself to work if you don't need the money?

I knew someone who was seriously injured in an accident. He received large compensation and managed to invest it with considerable success. So there he was, in his early forties, rich enough to never have to work. What did he do?

He got fed up and soon returned to the company where he had been a director, but not wanting the long hours he had previously worked, he volunteered to work there doing a basic job on a low income.

Why?

Although he could now live very comfortably, he missed the benefits that work brought him.

What are these benefits?

You can act out of compassion and desire

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I knew someone who was seriously injured in an accident. He received large compensation and managed to invest it with considerable success. So there he was, in his early forties, rich enough to never have to work. What did he do?

He got fed up and soon returned to the company where he had been a director, but not wanting the long hours he had previously worked, he volunteered to work there doing a basic job on a low income.

Why?

Although he could now live very comfortably, he missed the benefits that work brought him.

What are these benefits?

You may act out of compassion and a desire to help (if you worked for a charity, for example). But you can be motivated by many other things: curiosity (like a scientist who really wants to know about the world), challenge (like trying to invent something), or building satisfying relationships (you can work in sales and enjoy meeting people). ).

There are still others: Flow, (a state of mind that gives us deep happiness), enjoying nature, perhaps working to improve your environment, meaning and purpose (we feel good when driven by purpose), or winning. a sense of efficacy (our sense of well-being blooms when we feel like we are having an impact).

You may have thought of other factors while reading this, for example expressing yourself artistically, seeing others benefit from what you do, self-actualization (becoming all you can be through the use of your talents), etc.

Most people need to work to earn money, but hopefully they will get at least some of the above as well. For the wealthy person, earning money may no longer be a motivator, but there are many other reasons to work.

Motivation to work is not only related to money. The motivation to work is inherent because we have talent and that talent strives to drive its manifestation and deployment. People fail because they do not realize it and do not raise their talents to the necessary level.

Once your talent is realized, you don't need any motivation. He would find the ways to manifest himself physically.

Actually, it takes different types of motivation to realize and activate one's talent and when one's talent is activated, no more motivation is needed. The exchange of talent for money and other resources is also very natural

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Motivation to work is not only related to money. The motivation to work is inherent because we have talent and that talent strives to drive its manifestation and deployment. People fail because they do not realize it and do not raise their talents to the necessary level.

Once your talent is realized, you don't need any motivation. He would find the ways to manifest himself physically.

Actually, it takes different types of motivation to realize and activate one's talent and when one's talent is activated, no more motivation is needed. The exchange of talent for money and other resources is also very natural and happens on its own.

It doesn't matter that people work hard for money, interested or not. But working without regard for money is a totally different scenario. Many people around us do not work for money, but are comfortable doing their jobs out of their own satisfaction. These people just love their job and want to do their job in any case. If you work hard at that particular job that brings you satisfaction, the money will automatically haunt you. The bottom line is the satisfaction of doing that job, then you will definitely be able to put more hours into work that will bring you happiness in doing it.

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It doesn't matter that people work hard for money, interested or not. But working without regard for money is a totally different scenario. Many people around us do not work for money, but are comfortable doing their jobs out of their own satisfaction. These people just love their job and want to do their job in any case. If you work hard at that particular job that brings you satisfaction, the money will automatically haunt you. The bottom line is the satisfaction of doing that job, then you will definitely be able to put more hours into work that will bring you happiness in doing it.

I have a habit of working hard even if I am paid a low salary or if I offer my services for free. I always think of something to do that I enjoy being humble and grateful for a happy life. I never have the attitude of working in a job with no future just to exist and live outside my means.

Money is not as motivating as most people have been taught to believe. In fact, surveys showed that most people, when given the option to choose between bonus and paid time off, will choose paid overtime.

And why do you want to work harder? Is your job threatened due to poor performance?

Either way, the answer is the same. The only thing that consistently motivates people to work is when they feel that their work has meaning beyond just paying the bills. When they feel that what they do somehow makes the world a better place.

You don't, you stay home, I guess. I also stay at home. But I guess I should go out to work. I need too. But I have so much to do here. I do not know. I like to stay at home.

I would just work to keep busy. I wouldn't mind making money. So if I couldn't learn a computer system, I wouldn't get anxious. If I didn't work, I would volunteer and give back.

If the vision or the goal is one that I can backtrack on. If I can see where the project is going, I would work hard on minimum wage just to get it done.

Hard work is a habit. It does not require motivation. It takes practice. It leads to an achievement that is motivating. Think like the Nike commercial. Just do it.

One of the biggest misconceptions in today's culture is that we can choose our attitude.

If true, why would someone feel insecure, jealous, or unmotivated?

If our wife cheated on us or we were left paraplegics in a car accident, why don't we just decide to be happy and optimistic about it?

Simply because we do not have the ability to control our thoughts and feelings.

No one does.

So what does this tell us about attitude and motivation?

Maybe it is that they are not something that we really develop.

Rather, we must understand that there is a push and pull toward motivation, and

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One of the biggest misconceptions in today's culture is that we can choose our attitude.

If true, why would someone feel insecure, jealous, or unmotivated?

If our wife cheated on us or we were left paraplegics in a car accident, why don't we just decide to be happy and optimistic about it?

Simply because we do not have the ability to control our thoughts and feelings.

No one does.

So what does this tell us about attitude and motivation?

Maybe it is that they are not something that we really develop.

Rather, we must understand that there is a push and pull in motivation, and that each has its uses and limitations.

Why can't we make our way through life

The big misunderstanding we have as a culture about motivation and attitude is that we see them as the ability to keep pushing.

It is as if we have a heavy sled that we are tasked with pushing wherever we go, through swamps, forests, and mountains.

From this perspective, isn't it obvious how limited motivation is?

Regardless of who you are, sooner or later you will simply get tired of pushing and your strength will run out.

Fortunately, motivation is not about pushing.

It's really about finding something that appeals to you.

  • When Michael Jordan spent his offseason shooting hundreds of jump shots every day, he wasn't "pushing" himself.
  • When former Starbucks CEO Howard Schulz worked 13 hours a day and then continued to work from home, he wasn't "pushing himself" to do so.
  • When GE CEO Jeffrey Immelt worked 100 hours a week for 24 years, he wasn't "motivating" himself to do it.

It's deceptively easy to look at these examples and conclude that the key to your success was your work ethic and your ability to motivate yourself.

In fact, I think that's completely the other way around.

I don't think these individuals motivated themselves to success, but rather that they all found something that TOOK them to greater heights.

They were so fascinated and inspired by what they were doing that putting in crazy hours wasn't much of a problem or sacrifice.

Their magical ability was not their ability to motivate themselves, but rather they found something that captured their imagination so completely that it pushed them forward like an invisible chairlift.

The push and pull of motivation

So does that mean we never need to push ourselves?

Not quite.

No matter how much you love what you do, there will be times when you just won't have much of a fight in you.

Everyone has bad days, unsafe times, and times when they feel tired, unmotivated, and insecure.

In those moments, you will have to move on.

But you can never push for long, because our ability to push is very limited.

That is why it is vital that we find what attracts us.

What this essentially points to is that motivation does not depend on us, but we have to open ourselves to motivation to find ourselves.

And when it finds us, in whatever form, we hold on and see where it takes us.

And if it gets stuck in mud sometimes, we help push it.

We are like the man sitting in the cart, my friend, while life is the horse.

Stop trying to be the horse.

Stop punishing yourself for lacking motivational horsepower.

When you realize that you are not the horse, you make room for the horse to find you.

So this is my personal account of motivation around work:

I come from a wealthy family. I wouldn't have to work for a living if I decided not to.

When I was 18 years old, I left home and since then I have not received money from my family. I have a very good relationship with my family, I just decided that I would go my own way in life and I stood my ground. I paid for my university studies (although I am not from the US, so the tuition is not as expensive as there), I worked all the time, I excelled in my studies and I got academic scholarships. Now I am finishing my master's degree

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So this is my personal account of motivation around work:

I come from a wealthy family. I wouldn't have to work for a living if I decided not to.

When I was 18 years old, I left home and since then I have not received money from my family. I have a very good relationship with my family, I just decided that I would go my own way in life and I stood my ground. I paid for my university studies (although I am not from the US, so the tuition is not as expensive as there), I worked all the time, I excelled in my studies and I got academic scholarships. Now I am finishing my master's degree and have paid my own expenses all the time (living expenses and tuition). I plan to continue to do so through my PhD.

I have a very good work ethic and am much more motivated to be good at what I do than most of my peers. I guess a big part of my drive is to succeed without the support of my family, so when I look back I know it was all me. It had nothing to do with my parents' financial success. It seems to me that the things you achieve are much sweeter for having won you with your own sweat.

But for me, it's also very much about doing the things that I really enjoy and the satisfaction that comes from doing them well. I firmly believe in not compromising your career; tirelessly pursue a career in a field that is challenging and interesting for you. If you can do that, then the search for motivation is meaningless; Motivation comes naturally from your daily routine.

I think it's good that money is not a great motivator for you. You're lucky; that relieves you of the pressure to make poor career decisions based on purely financial considerations. I have some friends who had to give up their dreams because they just didn't have enough money (musicians and actors mainly). It means that you can go out there and find a job that you are really passionate about and commit to that from a very "pure" place. Once you find it, you will find that the questions about motivation seem to disappear without you even having to try. The question of "where to find motivation" becomes irrelevant.

Good luck

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