How do you get promoted without asking for a promotion?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Jarrett Albert



How do you get promoted without asking for a promotion?

How do you get promoted without asking for a promotion?

Why would you feel like something is wrong or why would you be reluctant to make it known that your goal is to advance your career? During a performance review, why not tell your boss about your career goals and then ask what you would need to "show" him on your performance path to be considered ready to move on? What do you have to learn? What you have to do? What do others have to do with you? You can also request information on career paths within the organization.

Something I saw many times during my years in HR —- His

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How do you get promoted without asking for a promotion?

Why would you feel like something is wrong or why would you be reluctant to make it known that your goal is to advance your career? During a performance review, why not tell your boss about your career goals and then ask what you would need to "show" him on your performance path to be considered ready to move on? What do you have to learn? What you have to do? What do others have to do with you? You can also request information on career paths within the organization.

Something I saw many times during my years in HR. - Supervisors who had great employees were delighted ………. someone they could trust, one less thing to worry about. They weren't eager or didn't really even think about promoting these employees. It was not the first thing on his 'radar'. As a result, these people often posted ads for other jobs or during exit interviews, they would say… ”. I knew I would never get anywhere if I stayed. "

Express your interest in moving forward and your willingness to work hard and take on challenges to get there and get your supervisor's help or at least their opinion. Beware! Don't wait for others to do it for you! No one will be as interested in your success as you. If you're not ready to do these things yourself and want to trust others, you may not be ready for a promotion.

Another thing I hope you take seriously is learning, never stop learning about the industry you are in, about supervision / management. If there are certifications in your profession, follow them. Also, when you go further or have successes, keep a record and when it is time for evaluation, do your own evaluation and mention all your successes. It is not bragging if you worked and achieved something. Be passionate and know your worth and don't be afraid or reluctant to objectively describe your accomplishments. 'Lazy' is the biggest killer of his career, don't wait to be told what to do. Find out what needs to be done and do it. Energy, passion and enthusiasm get you noticed. Show them that you get things done.

You're right that simply 'asking for a promotion' isn't going to go a long way, but asking the people who have the authority to make things happen for you what they need to see you do and learn to advance your career isn't. it is. I don't ask for something for nothing. It's asking for their understanding of what it takes to show / do / be to get where you want to be! You are more than willing to put in the effort, just point me in the right direction.

How do you get promoted without asking for a promotion?

It sounds like you're looking to passively wait for a promotion "granted."

Na-Anh!

Understand:

  • High performers and performance STARS attract the attention of management and leadership.
  • Promotions and pay raises often happen together and are earned. Both are primarily based on one's performance. The two most common factors: the needs of the company and the budget.
  • Advances / promotions are subject to the availability of said position. (It is not possible to be promoted to a role that does not exist or is currently occupied).
  • If there is internally pos
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How do you get promoted without asking for a promotion?

It sounds like you're looking to passively wait for a promotion "granted."

Na-Anh!

Understand:

  • High performers and performance STARS attract the attention of management and leadership.
  • Promotions and pay raises often happen together and are earned. Both are primarily based on one's performance. The two most common factors: the needs of the company and the budget.
  • Advances / promotions are subject to the availability of said position. (It is not possible to be promoted to a role that does not exist or is currently occupied).
  • If there are internally posted opportunities you qualify for, APPLY FOR THEM.

Being very very very patient. If you are unwilling to share your career plans with your leadership, you are effectively withdrawing from the pool of qualified people for the next open position. There is a big difference between asking for a promotion, which involves immediate action, and indicating that you believe you can do more, indicating that you want to move forward and that you would like others to see your actions that way. So, “I would like my career plan to reflect my desire to advance” is better received than “I would like to have the next promotion”. Also note that the ad

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Being very very very patient. If you are unwilling to share your career plans with your leadership, you are effectively withdrawing from the pool of qualified people for the next open position. There is a big difference between asking for a promotion, which involves immediate action, and indicating that you believe you can do more, indicating that you want to move forward and that you would like others to see your actions that way. So, “I would like my career plan to reflect my desire to advance” is better received than “I would like to have the next promotion”. Also note that advancement is often decided collectively, which means time must be spent building consensus around its elevation.

Do the same things you would do if asked, primarily preparing to qualify. That means things like stepping up to take on more responsibilities, teaching others your skills so there are qualified people to fill the gap if you move up, learning some basic leadership skills, being visible and behaving professionally at all times.

I once heard a trainer at a leadership conference say that we should become the kind of person our dog wants us to be. I know, it's pathetic, but it's true. When you walk down the hall, are people glad to see you coming or rush to wait?

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Do the same things you would do if asked, primarily preparing to qualify. That means things like stepping up to take on more responsibilities, teaching others your skills so there are qualified people to fill the gap if you move up, learning some basic leadership skills, being visible and behaving professionally at all times.

I once heard a trainer at a leadership conference say that we should become the kind of person our dog wants us to be. I know, it's pathetic, but it's true. When you walk down the hall, are people glad to see you coming or do they sneak up and hide?

But asking is an important part of the process. I remember asking my boss why I was never promoted and he said, "You never asked me, how am I supposed to know you're interested?"

By always being on top of your game; always being available for any additional work that may be necessary. Being proactive and anticipating needs with realistic solutions and making sure to finish your tasks early, so you have time to get more done.

A promotion is the validation of the fact that you add value to your team and company; as such; you need to show that you add value. Otherwise, you can work 20 hours a day, but if no one realizes how important your contribution is, they just ignore it and get fatigued.

I am in favor of a specific respectful action. Here is an example of what it would do. I would ask to see your immediate boss. After the greetings, I will say this. (Your words are up to you in this regard).

"Lady, sir. If I asked you what I have to do to get a promotion, what advice would you give me? "

John

Hard work is not enough. Getting a promotion isn't just about exceeding expectations and doing a good job.

In fact, there are many very talented people who are ready for an expanded role in their organization and are ignored in favor of employees who know how to appeal to the ego of the boss rather than the best interests of the organization.

The hard truth is that you have to admit one thing: when it comes to who can give you a promotion, not everyone is the same. This does not mean that you are an idiot with people. But it means if you get two requests, the request comes from the person who can promote it

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Hard work is not enough. Getting a promotion isn't just about exceeding expectations and doing a good job.

In fact, there are many very talented people who are ready for an expanded role in their organization and are ignored in favor of employees who know how to appeal to the ego of the boss rather than the best interests of the organization.

The hard truth is that you have to admit one thing: when it comes to who can give you a promotion, not everyone is the same. This does not mean that you are an idiot with people. But it means that if you get two requests, the request that comes from the person who can promote you is the one that deals with priority. That means you take extra time to get to know the people who can offer you a promotion.

Another truth is knowing that your immediate boss cannot give you a promotion. This is just logical. If your boss is the shipping manager and you are his senior assistant, what can you promote him to? The best thing he can do is give you his job. Your boss won't do that unless you get a promotion. So be sure to expand your network and meet your boss's boss. That's important because your boss could get promoted or your boss could leave. If they do, their boss's boss will find a person to replace them. If they know you and have a positive impression of you, that would give you an advantage in this situation.

Another truth is that your own belief systems will get in your way more than you realize. Therefore, have belief systems that support your desire to be promoted. Do not use negative words related to knowing your boss and the top managers of your company. If you think that meeting your management team makes you a "kisser **" or "boot licker," it is unlikely that you will. Call it what it is: show your value to the organization so they put you in the right position to help. It's about promoting yourself and building your personal brand ... how can you do that if you don't talk to the people in charge of your career?

Yet another truth is taken from the old adage: the reward for solving a problem is solving a more interesting problem. Make sure your boss and colleagues respect you and believe you are competent in your current job. That means you actually have to be good at what you do. Being promoted means that the powers that be believe you have mastered your job and may be ready to take on greater responsibility. Do your job and do it well.

Another truth is that doing your job well is necessary but not enough. You also have to show that you have the minimum talent or skills to jump to the next level. If your new job requires public speaking, join toastmasters and start finding ways to demonstrate your public speaking skills. They should know that not only do you want the job, but that your skills fit the job.

If you can, become someone who is costly to get rid of. By that I mean having some skills that no one else in the organization can have or having a unique network that no one else has. The more expensive it is to get rid of, the more likely they are to try to accommodate your career ambitions.

An important task is to have an exit strategy. Expand your set of possibilities. Sometimes a promotion within a company is not possible and you have to jump ship to get promoted. Develop contacts in many other companies that have jobs similar to yours. Don't be naive enough to count on the goodwill of your managers. If you think you are an exceptional talent and they are not promoting you, have a plan to come out with a promotion ... then show them what you were missing. There is no room for bitterness or anger. That is just a waste of energy.

Another good idea is to have a plan for when you don't get the promotion. If you can't get your promotion, don't be bitter. Do not be angry. Always congratulate the person who got the promotion without any hard feelings. Always talk to your boss and assume that you made the decision for a "rational" reason. Ask, “For my own improvement, what do you think I had to do to get the promotion? What can I do in the future to earn your confidence that I can take on additional responsibilities? ”. While having this conversation, prepare your resume and have lunch with several people. If someone offers a better deal… walk away! Do not go angry, all angry. Just thank them for creating a place where you can become the person you are and tell them that your paths may cross again ... then go.

Finally, remember this: If you are constantly being overlooked in promotions, it is not because everyone is an idiot. It's because you are missing something. Even if that is not true, you better believe it. Because you have no control over others and you have significant control over yourself. Therefore, it is better to think about what you can do to improve your chances than to think about what a bunch of idiot handling is. Sometimes the best decision you can make is to walk away, even if it's a sideways move or even a small pay cut for a growing company. Toxicity has a way of infiltrating your entire life and nothing is more toxic than being in an environment where you feel like you are unappreciated. So don't be in that environment. But even when you leave, ask for feedback.

I hope this helps!

Drinking at work / during work hours. In most of my jobs, this would be grounds for termination. There were a couple of exceptions, like social drinks with clients at Manhattan real estate and job parties in California, but these were outliers.

However, for a couple of years I was employed by a new online English teaching company that was owned by the largest private education corporation in China. I worked at the corporate office in Zhongguancun, the "Silicon Valley" of Beijing, one to two days a week. However, most of my work was not in the office or even in Beijing, but on business trips around the country.

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Drinking at work / during work hours. In most of my jobs, this would be grounds for termination. There were a couple of exceptions, like social drinks with clients at Manhattan real estate and job parties in California, but these were outliers.

However, for a couple of years I was employed by a new online English teaching company that was owned by the largest private education corporation in China. I worked at the corporate office in Zhongguancun, the "Silicon Valley" of Beijing, one to two days a week. However, most of my work was not in the office or even in Beijing, but on business trips across the country promoting the company. In theory, my job was to represent the company to parents at schools, English competitions, press events, etc. In fact, my employer quickly informed me that they were side tasks and that all my "important" work would be done in bars or restaurants before or after these events. I remember that my future boss asked me in my job interview if I drank (yes) and smoked (no, I quit) and they told me that if I wanted the job I would be smoking now and it would be better if I could put up with the liquor. I assumed this was a joke. Was not.

Before each trip, a Chinese colleague and I would be equipped with around 10 boxes of cigarettes of different quality (in China you can go to a convenience store and buy a pack for less than a dollar or more than 30, it is up to you) and about 5 bottles of good to excellent liquor. These were "gifts" for our hosts. Without exception, my "demo classes" (attended by maybe a couple dozen kids and their parents, but my company filmed them and bothered them a lot more) or judging these silly English song and dance displays or whatever. whatever my company told me to do was followed by official meetings. with education executives where a lot of nothing was discussed ... and shortly thereafter luxurious lunches / dinners were offered for which my company paid, in which we distributed the variable quality and quantity of alcoholic beverages and cigarettes according to the rank of the educational official / administrator / director / etc., and then, without exception, with my colleague "knowing a good nearby bar" for a drink. Of course, this was carefully planned in advance by my company, who chose our hotels and restaurants for their proximity to said posh bar they knew, and we did not "by chance" invite anyone out for a drink. All of this was choreographed beforehand and executed by my Chinese colleague. I believe that in more than 40 trips to more than 15 cities we were rejected twice. They chose our hotels and restaurants because of their proximity to that fancy bar they knew, and it didn't "happen" that we invited anyone out for a drink. All of this was choreographed beforehand and executed by my Chinese colleague. I believe that in more than 40 trips to more than 15 cities we were rejected twice. They chose our hotels and restaurants because of their proximity to that fancy bar they knew, and it didn't "happen" that we invited anyone out for a drink. All of this was choreographed beforehand and executed by my Chinese colleague. I believe that in more than 40 trips to more than 15 cities we were rejected twice.

I barely spoke Mandarin when I started, but this hardly mattered once the alcohol started flowing. My accompanying colleague was always a woman, generally young and generally beautiful. Our clients were always men, usually middle-aged or older, and they were rarely handsome. His job was to flatter them and make sure they drank. My job was to look "professional" (between the event and the meeting / dinner and drinks, we would rush back to the hotel, change into ridiculous company shirts and put on tailored suits for me and formal dresses for her, and I'd take off the "camera makeup" while she put on more) and smoked the cigarettes that they offered me "generously" ... from the cartons we had given them that same day. He was also expected to drink the expensive whiskey "with them" (which of course we later insisted on paying for) and he seemed extremely impressed. These drunken nights never resulted in any official dealings, but that wasn't the point. We made so much more money by convincing administrators to "suggest" to parents that their students use our platform to "supplement" their children's English skills by getting clients drunk and letting them seduce my cute 19-22 year old colleague and dazzle the Laowai with your intellect than we do with the ridiculous demo lessons I gave when we didn't even offer in-person education. These drunken nights never resulted in any official dealings, but that wasn't the point. We made so much more money by convincing administrators to "suggest" to parents that their students use our platform to "supplement" their children's English skills by getting clients drunk and letting them seduce my cute 19-22 year old colleague and dazzle the Laowai with your intellect than we do with the ridiculous demo lessons I gave when we didn't even offer in-person education. These drunken nights never resulted in any official dealings, but that wasn't the point. We made so much more money by convincing administrators to "suggest" to parents that their students use our platform to "supplement" their children's English skills by getting clients drunk and letting them seduce my cute 19-22 year old colleague and dazzle the Laowai with your intellect than we do with the ridiculous demo lessons I gave when we didn't even offer in-person education.

Needless to say, although I was initially impressed by this "luxurious" lifestyle (they also paid for a beautiful apartment in Haidian and paid me more than anyone except the CEO) and amused me, my main job consisted of basically traveling around China and getting drunk. Chinese entrepreneurs got tired of it. Eventually they brought in an even more beautiful, lovelier and fluent Madarin-speaking Kiwi version of me, and they tried to convince me to quit and start working for another English-speaking company online so that, in essence, I could steal your data from IP, while they I still paid my apartment and my full salary. I refused and got out of there. Now I go back to educating people and I stop smoking and drinking and I am much happier.

But seriously, only in fucking China.

My assumption here is that depending on how you have written it, it is your director who has only been with the company for a few months and therefore does not feel comfortable advocating for promoting someone before they feel firmly rooted in the company. If you've only been with the company for a few months, I'd say you're unlikely to get promoted just yet.

What is unclear from the way he described the situation is whether he really deserves the promotion. Your colleagues, especially if you don't include your manager in your survey, are unlikely to necessarily tell your f

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My assumption here is that depending on how you have written it, it is your director who has only been with the company for a few months and therefore does not feel comfortable advocating for promoting someone before they feel firmly rooted in the company. If you've only been with the company for a few months, I'd say you're unlikely to get promoted just yet.

What is unclear from the way he described the situation is whether he really deserves the promotion. Your colleagues, especially if you don't include your manager in your survey, are unlikely to necessarily tell you to your face that you are deficient in areas that would prevent you from doing the job effectively at the next level.

That doesn't mean you aren't qualified for the position, just that you may have a biased perspective.

To answer the question of when to follow up, I would say that it depends on how formal your discussion was with your manager. If it was just a casual conversation, I think it's okay to immediately send a more formal email to your manager (and even consider copying someone from HR) saying that you would like to be considered for the manager position. This will give the company an opportunity to really dig into the question of whether they consider it capable of performing at the next level. If your previous conversation was more formal, you may want to wait at least a month or two before speaking with your manager again.

Another approach would be to see if your company publishes the position online and then apply for it. Not knowing anything about your company, they may have an internal job listing site that you can use, but if not, then enter a regular application, complete with a cover letter (clearly stating that you are a current employee of the company ) and more. Your resume to date should convey the message loud and clear that you believe you are the right candidate for the position.

During my time at Morgan Stanley, my manager advised me, "Be a vice president in your responsibilities and actions, and then you will become one."

Responsibilities come first. Then the promotion. Not the other way.

Ok so how do you take responsibility?

I remember being in a meeting where a senior had explained to me which slides he wanted in a PowerPoint presentation. Before I even asked the juniors who would do the slides, one enthusiastically said; "I'll take care of it."

And he did.

I didn't think much of this incident at the time. But that younger boy would later become one of the fa

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During my time at Morgan Stanley, my manager advised me, "Be a vice president in your responsibilities and actions, and then you will become one."

Responsibilities come first. Then the promotion. Not the other way.

Ok so how do you take responsibility?

I remember being in a meeting where a senior had explained to me which slides he wanted in a PowerPoint presentation. Before I even asked the juniors who would do the slides, one enthusiastically said; "I'll take care of it."

And he did.

I didn't think much of this incident at the time. But that junior boy would later become one of the fastest rising guys I had worked with during all my years at Morgan Stanley. I'm pretty sure it was that willingness to take responsibility that fueled his fast-track career.

If you want that promotion to go beyond taking on more responsibilities, fight for them.

If you really deserve a promotion, you don't have to convince or prove it to anyone. Your dedication and accomplishments in the workplace will speak for themselves.

However, given the level of fierce competitiveness in today's workplace, the above statement can be a bit overwhelming. Although dedication and accomplishments will remain the compelling factors, you should highlight them for the right person to notice.

The phrase "Hit while the iron is hot" would be the most appropriate here. Never brag about your accomplishments or your dedication to work instead of showing your competence. Trust me

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If you really deserve a promotion, you don't have to convince or prove it to anyone. Your dedication and accomplishments in the workplace will speak for themselves.

However, given the level of fierce competitiveness in today's workplace, the above statement can be a bit overwhelming. Although dedication and accomplishments will remain the compelling factors, you should highlight them for the right person to notice.

The phrase "Hit while the iron is hot" would be the most appropriate here. Never brag about your accomplishments or your dedication to work instead of showing your competence. Trust me, employers / CEOs / directors have a short memory when it comes to their achievements in the workplace and favoritism makes its way when it comes to such decisions. Showing your competence from time to time will get their attention. Try to be a shining star in meetings and participate as much as possible in the decision-making processes by presenting new, innovative and of course useful ideas.

Lastly, you can always try a much easier but often risky way ... "to please people." It's risky because you see that the person at the top is not stupid, they are at the top for a reason. And I personally despise those people.

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