How do you get a technical job?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Luca Nicholson



How do you get a technical job?

Most of us at some point have played a video game. I started as a kid becoming a gamer in the Nintendo and Xbox years. Not to date with myself, but it all started with an Atari 2600, and then on the Xbox and mobile later. It just sounded old with that one. Video games over the years have taught me patience, perseverance, and research. 2016 rolled and it finally hit me. A career is like playing a game and who you play it with.

1. Press the reset button

No matter how much you enjoy a game or how good you are at it, you will eventually burn out. This can happen when you lose inte

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Most of us at some point have played a video game. I started as a kid becoming a gamer in the Nintendo and Xbox years. Not to date with myself, but it all started with an Atari 2600, and then on the Xbox and mobile later. It just sounded old with that one. Video games over the years have taught me patience, perseverance, and research. 2016 rolled and it finally hit me. A career is like playing a game and who you play it with.

1. Press the reset button

No matter how much you enjoy a game or how good you are at it, you will eventually burn out. This can happen when you lose interest, passion, or both.

Think about your current job role now. Are you happy in that? Does your alarm sound like nails on a blackboard or the feeling you get when you hear the main theme of Star Wars? I'm sure you were able to answer that pretty quickly. I hope it was the last.

In a video game, you feel compelled to quickly install a new game or download a new game from the app store if your attention is waning. In real life, we can go into autopilot mode and never expand into other types of games. We can also neglect acquiring more skills or experience.

Think of your career as a gamer profile. Every game (job role) you played and the skills you learned (resume) fill it out with personal and technical skills. Use this to your advantage to take direct and thoughtful steps to boost your career.

2. So is it sports or RPGs or casual or arcade or racing or ...

I'll be honest and say this is the hardest step. It will require the most thought with the least amount of immediate action. At this point, you will need to determine which path you want to take. IT has a very large open world type of work it can do. Generally speaking, you can be an All-Star Coach or a People Leader. With enough skill and personality, you can do both once you show you have what it takes on each side of the coin. IT has industries ranging from software, hardware, storage, networking, security, big data, and more.

The web has some great company sites where you can view job types and descriptions. CompTIA is a vendor neutral company that created a roadmap based on different career paths. Companies like Microsoft, Cisco, Apple, and others use similar basic skills. However, a company certification is tailored to that specific company product or solution and goes beyond general basic knowledge.

3. So I have a flower, a pen and 30 coins ... now what?

Once you've determined the path you want to take, start looking for a "player's guide" on how to play. If you're already in IT, what positions does your company have that fit your background? What is the skill level required to be good at the role or better yet, awesome in that role?

If you are new to IT and change fields, what technical and / or personal skills do you have? Many people enter as IT technicians after having smashed the computers of friends and family or being the go-to person when something electronic that connects to the Internet breaks. Maybe it's IT sales that interests you and you have sales experience.

4. A search requires knowledge and a team.

Mario had Luigi. The Master Chief had Cortana. Michael Jordan had Phil Jackson. Well the last one went off course, but I think you can see where I'm going with this.

A well-known word in the business world is mentoring. Using those great people skills you have, ask the people who are successful doing what you want to do how they got there. It sounds easy right? Maybe your boss has the role you want. You might want to be like the network engineer sitting across the room with the Lego spaceship model. Maybe you reach out to a connection on LinkedIn or a tech site that you follow.

Now that you have started talking to them, write down the skills you currently have and the skills they have and gained from experience. You can't fight a fire chief with a stick or an Indy car with a go-kart.

Start developing those skills.

You can sometimes do this in your current company. If not, make it free ... yes, I just said free ... to friends, businesses, and organizations in your community. This accumulates two things.

  • You will develop your skills with people (soft skills)
  • It will build credibility in your work (badges of honor or tech skills in a way that sounds less to gamers)

You can add these skills to your resume and portfolio of things you've worked on. You can also get good feedback on a project, web design, or coding you did as congratulations.

5. How long does it take to win the game?

Have a clear vision, a clear goal, and a clear timeline. Give realistic timelines, but strive to beat your own "lap time" on the track. With no goals for you, a ship goes on sinking forever like a gambling error.

Is your goal to have your own company or to be an entrepreneur? Is your goal to be a scrambler black belt ninja or a president-level leader in an established company?

The point is, your target will have different requirements than other people. A college degree can be very useful in IT. Lots of practical experience and industry-recognized certifications can also have a great deal of value. Being the Super Mario expert that I am now, I can beat the game by going through all the levels quite quickly. Playing a game like The Sims or Skyrim requires a lot more character development and time spent playing the game.

Remember that most people cannot win a game from start to finish all at once.

It takes trial, error, and failure (failing means learning here) multiple times to get really good at something.

Be continual in your quest for improvement and strive to step out of your comfort zone.

Have a clear goal and a clear vision. "I will win the game" is not a clear objective. "I will win the game by playing one hour a day for two weeks using the complete game guide here with the help of 3 x and y skill players" is a real goal. Use steps 3 and 4 that I mentioned to sharpen the blade where you can cut something just by touching it.

Just like in Pac-Man, you can keep leveling up endlessly and maybe eventually beating the game. Meanwhile, you will be chasing "ghosts".

As with any job, it involves solid preparation, possibly the right skills, but certainly the right motivation and hunger for the job.

1. Preparation: Get to know the industry, especially also locally for the city in which you are looking for work. Know roughly what role suits you and you are excited about. The biggest detour is a candidate who answers the question, "What job are you looking for?" With "Literally Anything".

2. Get Startup Experience
You don't need to quit your job or take an unpaid internship to gain startup experience. Just offer to help out at a local startup or a

Keep reading

As with any job, it involves solid preparation, possibly the right skills, but certainly the right motivation and hunger for the job.

1. Preparation: Get to know the industry, especially also locally for the city in which you are looking for work. Know roughly what role suits you and you are excited about. The biggest detour is a candidate who answers the question, "What job are you looking for?" With "Literally Anything".

2. Get Startup Experience
You don't need to quit your job or take an unpaid internship to gain startup experience. Just offer to help out at a local startup or event, or take on Noah Kagan's sumo challenge.
All of this will give you a valid experience to start something from scratch.

3. Prepare with skills along the way
Demonstrable digital knowledge can go a long way. Coding, for example, is one of the best skills to learn right now.
If you don't think coding is your thing, or you just don't enjoy coding, then UX design or digital marketing can be your cup of tea.
There are many great online and offline schools that offer courses that teach these skills, such as General Assembly, Codecademy, or CareerFoundry.

4. Visibility
Get a great digital CV, like a page on the about.me page, update your LinkedIn profile, and write a blog. Employers like to see smart people who have their own opinions and are not too shy to express them.
You can show that you have digital savvy through a cutting edge digital CV like one of these examples. This will definitely give you an edge over your competition.

The above four points, plus sincere motivation and a "hunger" for work, should help you in your endeavors. Good luck!

1. As a person new to the world of technology, what is the first thing to do? Obviously, that defines your address (aka "who you want to be").

From my perspective, to get into IT, you have to be realistic: what skills do you already have? You are a good writer? You can become a tech writer.

Are you more on the tech side? The fastest way would be to become a quality control specialist. Want to dig deeper into coding? Great, it will take a little longer, but it's worth it. BUT if you have ZERO experience, if you are bad at solving logic problems, if you are bad at math, if your English will

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1. As a person new to the world of technology, what is the first thing to do? Obviously, that defines your address (aka "who you want to be").

From my perspective, to get into IT, you have to be realistic: what skills do you already have? You are a good writer? You can become a tech writer.

Are you more on the tech side? The fastest way would be to become a quality control specialist. Want to dig deeper into coding? Great, it will take a little longer, but it's worth it. BUT if you have ZERO track records, if you are bad at solving logic problems, if you are bad at math, if your level of English is very basic, DO NOT set unrealistic goals. DO NOT believe that you will complete any online course and are ready to go. No. Without experience, you can't just go into the profession and start earning billions.

2. 1) Get your education in that direction. Now if you want to become a non-tech IT specialist, this will take less time, but it doesn't mean you can skip it. Research is essential for any profession. And now, if you want to get a technical job, and if going to college is out of the question (you're old, broke, or just don't have 5 years to lose), start small. Take all the free courses on the web on the related topic. Subscribe to YouTube tech channels. Take a paid online course. Take a course offline.

2) Secondary Step Here: If you don't have any academic or education degree, OR EVEN if you do, consider getting certificates. This one CAN be done later (and honestly, with some experience, you will benefit even more from these certificates, and while you are a junior specialist, you really don't need them that much) BUT. In later stages, they will add to your credibility, and you will also benefit from them in terms of knowledge.

For example, Cisco and CompTIA offer a series of higher-level certification exams. You should also look for Microsoft Certified Solutions Expert (MCSE) certifications

3. 1) Optional, but highly recommended: take communication classes. A large part of your job will be to communicate with other employees and your boss (s) to understand their problems and present solutions. To prepare for these situations, develop your public speaking, writing, and interpersonal skills. Soft skills are so important - it's one of the reasons tech co-founders attract some non-tech co-founders. Because not everyone can COMMUNICATE with people and solve interpersonal problems.

2) FOR NON-NATIVE ENGLISH SPEAKERS, another secondary step here would be LEARNING ENGLISH. It is true that you can become a software engineer and work for your local companies with very basic English skills, BUT. Most likely, you will not be able to find a better job or work remotely. Because remote teams are usually international. And in international teams everyone speaks English. There's no way you can avoid learning English if you want to be a high-paying remote IT specialist.

4. Once you've done all of these basics (and they can be done simultaneously and may take 3 months to 2 years, it depends on your pace and situation and how lazy you are), it's time to APPLY for a Specialist job. in you.

More tips on how to become an IT specialist (and land a technical job) here:

HOW TO BECOME A SPECIALIST AND QUICKLY GET A WELL PAID JOB AT HOME

Every job and I mean every job is a tech job.

It doesn't matter if you work in agricultural, medical, administrative jobs ...

There are low-tech jobs that seemed to be frowned upon for no reason.

So-called high-tech jobs have the wrong image. I work in high tech, but all I touch is a computer. I no longer touch technology in a lab or at my desk ...

Then there is the research that I clearly identify as technological jobs, because new technologies are developed here.

Most jobs in our time require long-term education and training. Don't expect to go in and get a technical job. I was 21 in school and education.

Keep reading

Every job and I mean every job is a tech job.

It doesn't matter if you work in agricultural, medical, administrative jobs ...

There are low-tech jobs that seemed to be frowned upon for no reason.

So-called high-tech jobs have the wrong image. I work in high tech, but all I touch is a computer. I no longer touch technology in a lab or at my desk ...

Then there is the research that I clearly identify as technological jobs, because new technologies are developed here.

Most jobs in our time require long-term education and training. Don't expect to go in and get a technical job. I was 21 in school and education. You may think it is excessive, but I don't want to mislead you.

Pushing a button is not a technical job.

I agree with Raffaela, knowing that your skill set and preparation are key. I work at Workbridge Associates, where recruiters have exceptional knowledge in the tech industry and can help anyone land their dream (tech) job. They are not only looking for their job, but they are a perfect match. They will align your goals with those of a potential company, and since Workbridge is national in scope, you are sure to find something in its large set of options to suit your wants and needs. Recruiters are experienced in preparing candidates for interviews and they know the ins and outs behind landing a job.

Keep reading

I agree with Raffaela, knowing that your skill set and preparation are key. I work at Workbridge Associates, where recruiters have exceptional knowledge in the tech industry and can help anyone land their dream (tech) job. They are not only looking for their job, but they are a perfect match. They will align your goals with those of a potential company, and since Workbridge is national in scope, you are sure to find something in its large set of options to suit your wants and needs. Recruiters are experienced in grooming candidates for interviews and they know the ins and outs of landing a job at a large technology company.

Looking for a job in technology?

- Maintain a project on GitHub

- Use more than one language

- Demonstrate more than one type of deployment (web, cloud, desktop, mobile, etc.)

- Show your work in blogs and videos.

- Don't be a fanboy / girl

- Treat others with respect

The main form is a technical college degree. After that, there are certifications from Cisco and Microsoft. There is also the A +, I don't know where that comes from. After that, a record is set by contributing to open source. Sheet of that, there is learning at work.

There are so many answers to this question that it is difficult to know where to start.

My advice, having spent 25 years in the industry and having interviewed thousands and hired hundreds of people, is to find your passion first. Do you want to be a developer, infrastructure person (i.e. support, servers, etc.), website designer, etc.? Think carefully, as many jobs are becoming commodities as IT moves to the cloud.

What I don't recommend is to go out and get a degree. Anyway, not at the beginning.

Every time we advertise a job, we get hundreds of applicants, most of them with degrees and most of them

Keep reading

There are so many answers to this question that it is difficult to know where to start.

My advice, having spent 25 years in the industry and having interviewed thousands and hired hundreds of people, is to find your passion first. Do you want to be a developer, infrastructure person (i.e. support, servers, etc.), website designer, etc.? Think carefully, as many jobs are becoming commodities as IT moves to the cloud.

What I don't recommend is to go out and get a degree. Anyway, not at the beginning.

Every time we advertise a job, we get hundreds of applicants, most of them with degrees and most of them with CVs that look and sound exactly the same (if I had a dollar for every person who has `` great communication skills ''! ). For one of those hundreds of indistinguishable applicants, then a degree is a minimum requirement, but it will hardly make you more employable.

Instead, consider volunteering your time for work experience. Find out who you want to work for and cold call them - prepare well and be brave enough to do it, and one of them will at least allow you to volunteer soon enough.

I once heard from a guy who called the same company every month for five months before they finally gave him a paid job just to shut him up.

Most volunteers (who are smart and still motivated, despite not being paid) are hired in 3 to 6 months. Even if it took you two years to get hired, you'd be better off than going to college (college degrees take three years and cost a fortune, it doesn't cost you anything to volunteer).

If I see a cover letter from someone who has (or is) volunteering their time for work experience, then that CV will be read and they will likely get an interview. For me, this is a bigger differentiator than a college degree.

Of course, you would learn things in college that you don't necessarily learn on the job, but this answer is about getting a job in IT, not improving yourself.

One last tip: be passionate about technology and incorporate it into your life. As a teenager I used to read software manuals (they used to be printed and bound like phone books) while on vacation at the beach. The best developer I hired was completely self-taught and spent many hours writing code in his room (we hired him at 17). Ironically, he's working for us part-time while completing his degree and will be doing his master's degree next year, so you've figured out how to get the best of both worlds.

If you have a passion for technology and spend your time honing your knowledge and skills, not only will it be easier for you to land a job, but you will also tend to love your job, even if you work for free.

It's great to know about your choice, working in a startup.
Good to know about your choice (s) (zomato or ecommerce startups)
Since you made a decision, let us look ahead.

First of all, accept the fact that simply replying to a job post or posting a resume will not get you a job. Not in this competitive India where every year 3 lac students graduate every year. For a company like zomato, if they post a job requirement, thousands of people will apply. Just by selecting the resumes, there is very little chance that you will be selected. Practically a lottery. You don't want to leave it up to

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It's great to know about your choice, working in a startup.
Good to know about your choice (s) (zomato or ecommerce startups)
Since you made a decision, let us look ahead.

First of all, accept the fact that simply replying to a job post or posting a resume will not get you a job. Not in this competitive India where every year 3 lac students graduate every year. For a company like zomato, if they post a job requirement, thousands of people will apply. Just by selecting the resumes, there is very little chance that you will be selected. Practically a lottery. You don't want to leave it to chance, do you? So how do you get noticed and how do you get recruited?

There are a few steps you can take.
1. List all of your favorite startups. How many have you got? 15 to 20? Good
2. Now arrange them in order, with the one you like best at the top and the next favorite at the bottom and so on.
3. Now choose the top 3 or at most 5 startups and start learning all about them. I'd rather ask you to choose the minimum number of startups, but not 1.
4. Connect with the founders and co-founders and, if possible, the technology leaders or leaders in your niche. Follow them on Twitter, Facebook or any social network where they are available. I prefer to send linkIn requests only to people you know personally or are in contact with, but that shouldn't stop you from trying.
5. Understand your business. Understand each startup, what they are doing, what their market is, what kind of products or services they offer, and how each of the startup's founders or leaders is getting involved.
6. Stay alert and alert: This is the most important phase. Once you have done all of the above steps (it may take a few weeks to complete, 4-5 weeks maximum), you will start to see a pattern of how they work and what your needs are. Remember all the time, keep building a solid portfolio with samples of your work (open source or otherwise).
7. Don't give them your resume, give them solutions. Now, you have found what they sell and the problems they face. If you see a problem they are facing and that problem is in your area of ​​expertise, please offer a solution for free. Yes, free. Let them know that you exist. Let them know how your solution can help them. Make them realize that if you stay with them, you can greatly improve their business.

All's well That ends well.
Now, you can ask yourself or they will most likely ask you to work with them. It is a win-win situation.

You will most likely not be considered a new or junior employee if you are called. Even if someone thinks that you may not be suitable for that position, then you can defend your position by showing the value you are offering along with your portfolio of previous jobs that you have accumulated so far. So, speak your terms and negotiate well.

All of this content comes with a caveat -
this all sounds great, but you have to be good with your basic skills. This method of getting a job is not easy, as it requires you to know a lot about your main skill and you need to be up to date with current events in different startups. Sometimes a startup doesn't follow the same principles that you expect. Prepared to be rejected sometimes simply because they don't know you. Why would they listen to a stranger? Back up your analysis with evidence and offer help. If possible, you may have to work for them for free just to get their attention.

So if you have the courage, determination, and the right amount of skill, I should say that this should be your preferred way of landing a startup job. Otherwise, buy a tie and get a job in a corporate office or post a resume and wait, I just hope you get a call.

Best wishes

There are many tech careers you can pursue without a degree. Honestly, information technology is one of the best ways to start a career without a diploma. The industry is dependent on results and the lack of trade unions and professional associations leaves many opportunities open for people coming from other fields.

There is no better way, it will depend on what you like and what your future goals are.

Ok, but you want some examples. Here we go.

- Technical writer: his main skill is excellent writing. It is better that you like to write, because it is what you are going to do a lot.

- Software developer: main skill

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There are many tech careers you can pursue without a degree. Honestly, information technology is one of the best ways to start a career without a diploma. The industry is dependent on results and the lack of trade unions and professional associations leaves many opportunities open for people coming from other fields.

There is no better way, it will depend on what you like and what your future goals are.

Ok, but you want some examples. Here we go.

- Technical writer: his main skill is excellent writing. It is better that you like to write, because it is what you are going to do a lot.

- Software developer: the main skills are programming and databases, but here I am very brief. Ideally, you need to know how to code and implement a complete application.

- Business analyst: you need to know how to transform customer needs into requirements. There you will need great communication skills.

- System administration: you need to know the networks, security and a lot of operating systems.

- Software Testing and QA: You need strong analytical skills to think of test scenarios and test cases.

There are many more: Database Administrator (DBA), User Experience and Design, etc.

As another quran replied: "You need to show that you have the skills that a university graduate would have." I totally agree with that. You don't need to have a degree, but you do need to be tech-savvy and self-taught to stay current as you progress in your career.

I wrote a book called Learn How to Test Software and Start Your Tech Career for people like you who want to move to IT but don't know where to start. You can check it if you want.

I hope I can help.

Filipe Siqueira

There are only two things you need to do.

  1. Make your resume stand out. Be brief and put all the emphasis on your most notable accomplishments. Having a friend or former co-worker who works at Google to recommend your resume will increase your chances.
  2. Get it right in every interview. Some preparation is required (I could have done up to 20 hours for my Amazon interview, less for Google and SpaceX). Preparation will not fill in the holes in your CS experience. But it can help when it comes to coding on a whiteboard or addressing specific technologies.

There are many ways to prepare for a job at Google. Some engineers don't

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There are only two things you need to do.

  1. Make your resume stand out. Be brief and put all the emphasis on your most notable accomplishments. Having a friend or former co-worker who works at Google to recommend your resume will increase your chances.
  2. Get it right in every interview. Some preparation is required (I could have done up to 20 hours for my Amazon interview, less for Google and SpaceX). Preparation will not fill in the holes in your CS experience. But it can help when it comes to coding on a whiteboard or addressing specific technologies.

There are many ways to prepare for a job at Google. Some engineers don't even have a degree. However, there are things you can do to increase your chances of getting the job. Here is what I think would be the most direct course.

  • Start coding young. Early exposure (middle or high school) will give you a head start when you get to college. It will also make it easier to obtain an internship.
  • To compete. Mathematics, science, and computer skills abound at the high school and college levels. The mere participation is not particularly significant. Ranking at the state or national level is good. The international level is even better.
  • Get some work or research experience early on. It is possible (though not common) to get software engineering internships in high school. College is more common and is also a good time to start researching. Both will help you obtain internships and job applications. Also, you will have a good source of referrals. Side projects can be an alternative to an internship. The downsides to this are that you may not get the benefit of working with more experienced developers, and referrals can be harder to come by.
  • Get an internship at the company you finally want to work for. At Google, the conversion rate for interns is substantially higher than for those applying directly from college without an internship. Also, when you graduate you will already be familiar with the company and the tools that will help other graduates. Internship positions are competitive, so it is important to have a previous internship or research experience.
  • Receive an offer. Once you have obtained the internship, it is important that you perform up to your manager's expectations. No need to reinvent search, social media, etc. but try moving the needle a little.

At best, this is a guide to focus your efforts toward your goal. Don't worry if the trail doesn't match your experience. Most of the engineers who work at Google did not follow this precise course. I worked for several companies before getting the job at Google. Others have taken even more devious routes. Ultimately, what matters to get the job is being able to pass the interview. We have all prepared for it in our own way.

Other Guides:


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