How do you decide which career is best for you?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Bradley Ball



How do you decide which career is best for you?

The answer to this question is to not let finances or the appearance of finances be the overwhelming deciding factor in your decision to choose a job or career.

Let me turn the clock back a bit ...

This process begins in high school, when you choose classes and begin to determine what career you want to pursue.

A job is a subset of a career. You will have points along the way about which job to choose, but the decision criteria are the same. And the criteria is largely this: Does that career or that job touch your soul? Is it something that turns you on? Is it something you like?

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The answer to this question is to not let finances or the appearance of finances be the overwhelming deciding factor in your decision to choose a job or career.

Let me turn the clock back a bit ...

This process begins in high school, when you choose classes and begin to determine what career you want to pursue.

A job is a subset of a career. You will have points along the way about which job to choose, but the decision criteria are the same. And the criteria is largely this: Does that career or that job touch your soul? Is it something that turns you on? Is it something you wake up excited about in the morning? Does it fuel your passion and align with your vision and your dream?

Imagine for a moment studying for 4, 6, 8, maybe 10 years doing your 2, 4, 6 year internship or building your career to finally make your way to that corner office. And for that whole period of time and maybe 30, 40 or 50 years from then on, you don't really enjoy what you're doing. He's doing it for mercenary-style reasons, which are short-lived in terms of his satisfaction. And aside, if you choose a career or a job just for the money, my premise is that you will find yourself in the exact same position financially with only more zeros afterward. Money does not bring happiness. More money does not mean more net money. You will find that your expenses magically increase to match your higher income. In fact, most of the time, your expenses will be approximately 105% of your income, no matter what your income is. So, don't use finances as a prime mover, certainly not the sole engine of a career or job. The illusion of improvement in that area is just that: an illusion and is short-lived.

Do what fuels your passion. Then, in the high school and college environment, you will do better in those classes because you will be more motivated to do what needs to be done and put in study hours, get the extra credit, listen more closely, and genuinely learn the topic. because you are passionate about it. As a consequence, you are likely to get better grades than if you were doing something that you don't really enjoy, but because you feel like you have to because of the social, parental, or financial pressure you've put on yourself in relation to the choice. that career.

If economics is important to you and you have (here's the key) an adequate amount of discipline to use the growing financial gain to your advantage, then I would suggest choosing what moves your soul and fuels your passion. Your passion cannot be transformed into something that you think will pay you well.

Let me give you two examples.

Example # 1: Wayne Huizenga, founder of the Waste Management firm and also owner of the Miami Dolphins and Florida Marlins sports team franchises.

You're actually selling one of your Tennessee vacation homes right now, so if you want a great vacation home owned by a significant other, go to the market and spend three out of four million to buy it. His passion is garbage. Can you imagine for a moment a young Wayne visiting his parents who have this great vision and dream of their golden haired boy saying, "I want to go into the garbage business, I want to be a garbage guy." I imagine that parents who want the best for their children are not overly enthusiastic. But that was his passion, for whatever reason, and it touched his soul.

Now the results are obvious. He owns a multi-million dollar corporation and owns sports franchises and multiple vacation homes across the country and the world. I am not suggesting that it is your driver, that it is in vacation homes and sports franchises, or that it is in trash or garbage. What I am suggesting is that if you follow your passion and do it with that passion, because it becomes this virtuous circle and from there comes great success, however you choose to measure it, even with the economy.

Wayne Huizenga is a great example of how following your passion benefits all other areas, including economics. After all, if you are following your passion, be it the violin, garbage, high-tech, or low-tech, you will eventually succeed in the broadest sense of that word because you are doing what moves you. To be successful, all you really have to do is do that better than half the other people who are doing it too. You're in the top 50 percent, which is very likely if you do it with passion. Most likely, it is in the top 10, 15, or 25 percent. You will be successful, however choose to measure that.

Example # 2: myself

About ten years ago, I was the CEO of a $ 500 million corporation. In fact, I led the management buyout. I was one of the most important owners of that cooperation. I was on top of my game, so to speak. Leading a highly respected company in the industry. On the board of directors of the industrial-level group. In fact, I chaired the corporation's global industry group. But it wasn't my passion. Sorry. I'm not one of those people who jumps out of bed for a budget meeting. I'm glad that there are people who do that and have that passion. They are necessary and I do not criticize them, but it was not me. I enjoy building things, creating things, transforming people and their careers, and seeing growth occur in people, places, and organizations. Yes, I could do that as CEO and I was doing it, but when you sit in the corner office, as much as you like to get out and about to affect change, you can't help but spend more time on budget meetings, supply meetings, or negotiation meetings, and all that is necessary. I think I was doing a good job with them, but it didn't touch my soul. So I left, and for the past ten years, after coming back and re-educating and refining my education at The University of Chicago Booth, a great institution, I manage my own private equity fund in which I can participate in a meaningful place in the world. design business plans and help entrepreneurs grow their business to a point of great success as defined. Due, I take my share of the economic pie of adding value. I am a big believer that if you grow something, you must participate in its growth. That is the space I am in now. One of the main assets in my private equity fund is a company called Madison Wall, which owns other companies such as Idea Booth, Idea Kitchen, and BGO (Blinding Glimpse of the Obvious). I love being able to get involved in those teen ventures and help them grow. Seeing a crazy idea turned into a real business plan with a real economy, and then a successful, growing business where we attract good people and help them grow and follow their passion (and we all grow it and share the success of that together) is one of the other things we do at Madison Wall.

Yes, economics is important to me and, ironically, for the first few years I didn't earn as much as when I was CEO, but now I earn a lot more. I went on all fronts. Instead of being a hero to the airlines and hotels, being away from home and paying a high price in that regard, I now work from home to a large extent. I still travel more than most so I can take the itch out of frequent flier miles and be in different places. I work with those with whom I want to work. That is one of the decision-making criteria that I have for any investment or company in which I participate. Answering the question: Would I like to go on vacation with this person? If we are going to participate together in a commercial enterprise, I am likely to spend more time with you on a more significant level than if we were on vacation together, especially in the short term. The last thing I need is to wake up in the morning and say, "Oh, I have to spend the day with so-and-so." I'd rather wake up in the morning and say, "Great! I have a conference call with so-and-so and a meeting with so-and-so. They are people who make me want to be better and who are aligned with my vision, people who want to help me get there. where I want to go and I can help get where they want to go. " That gets me out of bed in the morning and the economy positively flowing in my direction. people who want to help me get where I want to go and I can help them get where they want to go. " That gets me out of bed in the morning and the economy positively flowing in my direction. people who want to help me get where I want to go and I can help them get where they want to go. "That makes me get out of bed in the morning and the economy flows positively in my direction.

I can do what stirs my soul. I have more time for quality of life. The old cliche of being on your deathbed and one of your biggest regrets is spending too much time in the office. I don't have that regret. I don't want that regret. I have a great balance in my life between family, personal time and business time. Essentially, I run a lifestyle business. I do what moves my soul, I pursue my passions in all facets, I get paid very well to do it and, as Maslov would say, "I am on the road to self-realization." That is where you want to be.

In conclusion: is the economy important? Yes. But is moving to a new geography or a new job just for financial reasons a smart decision criterion? No. You will see that the delta of your income is quickly consumed by an increase in the delta in your expenses. Make the decision for reasons and do what moves your soul. Do it for a reason more important than the economy. So if you do it right (and you most likely do it because you are following your passion), the economy will flow and flow in abundance so that you can really build real wealth and not just have a great income. .

Finding the right job is about the intersection of what you are good at (talent), what you enjoy doing (passion), and what society needs right now (demand).

To find your talent, remember times when people were impressed with something you did. Or a time when you finished something easily and quickly, when others struggled a bit. Is something natural to you? Find out what you're good at, and then explore related job fields or other skills related to your talents.

Take note of the patterns that keep emerging; Are there companies, industries or jobs that stand out? That is a clue that you are

Keep reading

Finding the right job is about the intersection of what you are good at (talent), what you enjoy doing (passion), and what society needs right now (demand).

To find your talent, remember times when people were impressed with something you did. Or a time when you finished something easily and quickly, when others struggled a bit. Is something natural to you? Find out what you're good at, and then explore related job fields or other skills related to your talents.

Take note of the patterns that keep emerging; Are there companies, industries or jobs that stand out? That is a clue that you are on the right track, and you should keep them in mind and check them frequently. That is the clue you are looking for as to which job is right for you.

To find your passion, think about the last time you said "wow, time really flies." Was he watching sports? Talking to friends? Writing a blog post? What would you do all day, every day, if money wasn't an issue? Find out what makes you happy, what you love to do, and then explore related fields of work.

This is not as simple as it sounds, but almost all activities have some kind of relationship with a profession. Do you enjoy chatting with friends? You can be an excellent customer service representative or advisor. Do you love to watch sports? Maybe you like being a sports journalist. Do you love Instagram? Social media marketing. The trick is to get creative and not just explore the requirements for getting a job. Instead, look at the skills needed to get the job done on a daily basis.

Identifying the market demand for your skills is the most difficult part of this process to achieve. But if you know your talents and what you are passionate about, you don't need to start your search all over again. You should have a short list of jobs, careers, and industries that interest you or that you might be a good fit for (there is a difference).

Then do more homework on two or three of the jobs you think are right for you. Are there really openings for these positions in your area? If not, the market may not be the right one where you live and you should consider moving. Or, if you feel strongly about a potential job, it might be time for more training.

Also keep in mind that anything the computer can do, even remotely, will likely be automated in the near future. So be ambitious about what you want to do and embrace technology along the way. Just because a job is automated doesn't mean it's going to go away. Instead, it means that there will be far fewer people doing the work, but there will still need to be people to build, maintain, monitor, and improve those machines. And those people will be in great demand.

Good luck!

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