How do US founders pay for health care after leaving their full-time jobs?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Kinsley Sanford



How do US founders pay for health care after leaving their full-time jobs?

Look for COBRA continuation medical coverage. Allows "founders" to remain in health care coverage if a "founder" qualifying event occurs:

  • Termination of the employee's employment for any reason other than serious misconduct; or
  • Reduction in the number of working hours.


I'm sure you can use your imagination for what needs to be done at this point with the options above. One hint I can give is to rethink the definition of "quitting" a bit.

More information is available here Frequently Asked Questions about COBRA Continuation Health Coverage

When it comes to making money online, there are various websites available on the internet that claim to pay for work, but the reality is something else. More than 95% of those websites, even though they seem legitimate, will never pay you money. They are a fraud.

So guys, in this post, I am going to tell you the 4 genuine ways to earn money online.

Number 1 is here: -

1. Self-employed

Hmmm .... ok, now what is freelancing?

If a person who is self-employed and works from anywhere at any time according to his abilities, he is actually a freelancer.

If you have typing skills, different types of data entry work, g

Keep reading

When it comes to making money online, there are various websites available on the internet that claim to pay for work, but the reality is something else. More than 95% of those websites, even though they seem legitimate, will never pay you money. They are a fraud.

So guys, in this post, I am going to tell you the 4 genuine ways to earn money online.

Number 1 is here: -

1. Self-employed

Hmmm .... ok, now what is freelancing?

If a person who is self-employed and works from anywhere at any time according to his abilities, he is actually a freelancer.

If you have skills in writing, different types of data entry jobs, graphic design, web design, office, transcription, and others, then you can work as a freelancer and earn good income figures online.

Here are some genuine and more trusted websites that really pay to start your freelance career.

  • Upwork (formerly oDesk)
  • Freelancer
  • Toptal
  • Fiverr
  • Guru

2. Youtube channel

You can also create a YouTube channel to earn money online here you have to make videos according to your interest or skill and upload them to your channel. Here you will be paid for the ads that are displayed on your videos. Once you meet the Google Adsense requirement (which is a bit of watch time and a few little things), you can request Adsense ads and they will approve you and the ads will start showing on your videos. Once the ads start showing on your videos, it starts to generate income.

3.

Affiliate Marketing Affiliate marketing is a marketing arrangement whereby an online retailer pays a commission to an external website for the traffic or sales generated from their referrals.
You just have to sign up for the affiliate marketing program and start sharing the affiliate links when someone purchases products or services through your link, then you will be paid a percentage of the product price as commission.

Here is the list of some of the top genuine and well paying affiliate marketing networks.

  • Amazon Associates
  • eBay
  • Terraleads
  • Clickbank
  • Wide markets
  • Rakuten
  • CJ Affiliate by Conversant

4. Website or Blogs

I think the best here if you could show some dedication with the right niche of your site, you could definitely make money with attractive figures. The revenue here comes from the ads displayed on your website, by affiliate marketing programs, and other sources.

Hope it's helpful, if you have any questions in mind, please post them in the comments.

In 2017, I made more than $ 650,000. My wife is a doctor and earned over $ 320,000. This was the first year that together we made about 7 figures. We are both in our mid-thirties, we are very good at what we do, and we have excellent future career prospects. We have a net worth of a few million and, to a large extent, we lead very comfortable lives. However, at the end of May 2018, I quit my high paying job to be a stay-at-home dad for our 3-year-old son, essentially reducing our income by two-thirds.

The main reason for leaving my career was so that I could live a life with as few regrets as possible. I have spoken

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In 2017, I made more than $ 650,000. My wife is a doctor and earned over $ 320,000. This was the first year that together we made about 7 figures. We are both in our mid-thirties, we are very good at what we do, and we have excellent future career prospects. We have a net worth of a few million and, to a large extent, we lead very comfortable lives. However, at the end of May 2018, I quit my high paying job to be a stay-at-home dad for our 3-year-old son, essentially reducing our income by two-thirds.

The main reason for leaving my career was so that I could live a life with as few regrets as possible. I have talked to many people over the years and asked them what they regret the most. 9 times out of 10 the answer was the same: not spending enough time with your children when they were young. Knowing what he knew, he didn't want to end with the same regret.

Second, he had always harbored the desire to be an entrepreneur. I am currently working on my startup. Although I miss the infrastructure, support systems, and pace of my former employer, I enjoy building something from scratch that will eventually acquire a personality based on my beliefs and values.

In the end, there are only two things that matter: your health and your time. When you have your health (energy), how will you best spend your time? Start a business, volunteer, teach, travel, etc. they are viable options as long as you are passionate about what you are doing.

The time is now! Live your only life by your own rules with as few regrets as possible.

Another startup, of course!

Just don't repeat what caused the first one to fail.

Whether his latest startup succeeds or fails, an entrepreneur learns not only from mistakes, but also from the things he did well. And the people they met, the connections they made. And the things they just did.

On-the-job training is the best and sometimes the only way to learn how to run a business. That includes how to conduct job interviews, deal with investors, how to negotiate a deal, how to work with accountants, office politics, all the government forms to fill out, etc. Ideally you would get

Keep reading

Another startup, of course!

Just don't repeat what caused the first one to fail.

Whether his latest startup succeeds or fails, an entrepreneur learns not only from mistakes, but also from the things he did well. And the people they met, the connections they made. And the things they just did.

On-the-job training is the best and sometimes the only way to learn how to run a business. That includes how to conduct job interviews, deal with investors, how to negotiate a deal, how to work with accountants, office politics, all the government forms to fill out, etc. Ideally, you would achieve this by working with more experienced founders at a startup or other small business, but nothing else takes the place of doing it yourself.

Of course, some people burn out, don't reflect on themselves, or learn the wrong lessons. Sometimes mistakes are not so easy to forgive or reveal a lack of skill, dedication, integrity, judgment, or other things that are not so easy to correct. Some people are just a good fit for startups.

Among startups, a former founder can work as a contractor, consultant, gig economy worker. Some go back to school to earn an advanced degree. Others take time off. If they still have money despite failure, they can try investing. They probably have a network of clients, investors, suppliers, colleagues, even competitors, who know their work and would hire them for their skills.

One thing they may not be suitable for is returning to their old jobs. To paraphrase a famous poem (*), employers will rightly fear you once you've tasted the autonomy and freedom of running your own business.

(*) Samuel Taylor Coleridge wrote: “Watch out! Beware! ... Because he fed on honey dew and drank the milk of paradise ".

Quitting my job twice without having a new job in hand would qualify me to answer this question.

Like many other young people in this country, I completed my engineering at the not so famous university of Bengaluru.

I was glad I was selected by the campus in one of the good manufacturing companies with a good salary and all the other benefits. This was enough to drive me crazy the day I was selected at that company.

After completing Bachelor of Engineering I traveled to Mumbai to join this wonderful company for a week of training with a lot of hope and enthusiasm.

After a week,

I did not have the same energy and

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Quitting my job twice without having a new job in hand would qualify me to answer this question.

Like many other young people in this country, I completed my engineering at the not so famous university of Bengaluru.

I was glad I was selected by the campus in one of the good manufacturing companies with a good salary and all the other benefits. This was enough to drive me crazy the day I was selected at that company.

After completing Bachelor of Engineering I traveled to Mumbai to join this wonderful company for a week of training with a lot of hope and enthusiasm.

After a week,

I didn't have the same energy as Josh when he came back from Mumbai after a week of training. Somehow I didn't like the job I was supposed to do at that company.

As soon as I got back to Bengaluru, the first thing I did was quit that job.

Reason: I didn't like the job.


The hunt for the next job began. Many things were going through my head about how to pay off my student loan, how to show my face to my parents, etc.


After much struggle for over a month looking for a job, I ended up getting a vacancy at another manufacturing company. What paid me half of my previous job.

The only reason for joining that company was to pay off my student loan.

Nightmare in this company started as soon as I started working there.

Daily: 12 business hours

Weekly: 7 business days

Monthly: 30 business days.

I worked there for 3 months, just to get the salary to pay off my student loan.

During those 3 months, I had lost weight, my health was in poor condition, and I had acquired low blood pressure due to lack of sleep and food.

One day I made the decision to ditch that job, again without thinking about what I would do next.

Reason: Less salary, not sleeping, not eating, health problems.


I was unemployed again and had not started paying my student loan.

The bank sent a notice to my house for not paying the loan. I had to go ask the bank manager to give me more time to start paying off the loan since I didn't have a job. The manager was kind enough to give me 2 more months of time.


I spent 3 more months looking for work and luckily I didn't find any.

He began to avoid meeting friends.

I started going to the parks alone and thinking about my life.

I started going to the temples alone and crying before God asking him what mistake he had made by not having a job.

I started thinking about killing myself so I wouldn't have to pay off my loan.

I started going to all the companies and handing over my resume to the security guards.

Little by little I had started to regret my decision to quit my first job, I went into depression and literally cried every day thinking about my life.


But one fine day, I was interviewed at an IT company and I finally got a job after 7 months of struggle. I started paying off my loan immediately. I got this job and finished paying off the full loan in the next 2 years.

In this job, I didn't make the mistake of finding what's right and what's wrong with the job. Instead, I adjusted myself to do the given job well. This is how I started to like the job and I am still doing the same job after 7 long years.


Answering your question of leaving a job without having another job, in my experience, there is no perfect job in this world. You may like something and you may not like something.

My suggestion is, instead of landing a perfect job, do the job that you are doing perfectly. Then you will start to like it.

Never risk leaving your current job without a backup. You will have to go through a lot of difficulties if you do.

Nagesh,

This depends on the benefits you are referring to. Before reading, please note that I am not a lawyer, HR representative, etc. What follows is just my understanding of the laity based on my own experiences.

Unemployment:

This is a benefit for people who are laid off from their current job. This can be a mutually agreed or non-agreed termination. But the criterion is that the termination is caused by the company. Unemployment insurance is there to protect the employee in the event of action by the employer.

If you resign, that is an action on your part, so that unemployment does not occur.

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This depends on the benefits you are referring to. Before reading, please note that I am not a lawyer, HR representative, etc. What follows is just my understanding of the laity based on my own experiences.

Unemployment:

This is a benefit for people who are laid off from their current job. This can be a mutually agreed or non-agreed termination. But the criterion is that the termination is caused by the company. Unemployment insurance is there to protect the employee in the event of action by the employer.

If you quit, that's an action on your part, so unemployment won't kick in. You made the decision to leave, so obviously, you had a plan-b in place… right? If you quit due to a hostile work environment, then that is a different matter that should be discussed with someone from HR or an attorney.

Health insurance continuity:

When you leave a company, either by your choice or yours, in the US, you will generally be offered a form of continuity insurance that matches what you were getting prior to leaving the company. Please note that depending on the level of coverage, this coverage can be quite expensive. This is out of pocket for you, as once you leave, it is no longer the responsibility of your previous employer.

If you leave a business, let's say ... at the beginning of the month, your health coverage will extend until the end of the month. Check with your health coverage and HR / etc. for details as it may differ by region / etc.

FSA / HSA:

The spending plans and others are subject to specific rules established by the agreements of the respective company with the insurance companies / etc. Generally, the FSA is associated with the business you are in. Once you leave the company, that FSA ends. I'm not 100% sure about the HSA and if it will roll over to the next company. But I know the FSA is not following you.

401K / retirement plans:

It depends on company policy. With 401K plans, you can no longer contribute to them, but the account remains open as long as the amount is above the minimum. You can roll over the 401K to an IRA / ROTH-IRA or something like that, but that's up to you. If you took out a 401K loan while employed, you will have to pay the money back in full after leaving the company or face a tax penalty. Definitely consult your financial / tax advisor on this.

Access to company benefits (gym / car wash / massages / free food / etc.):

Umm ... yes ... no. Those are exclusive benefits for employees. So those end when you leave work.

Here is a story that can be helpful in your endeavors.

When I was 26, I was working as an account executive at a growing technology company. The company produced $ 25MM in annual revenue at the time of my departure, up from $ 15MM just 2 years earlier. He had worked there for the past two years, earning more than 15% of the income output. I made $ 275K / year for 2.5 years ($ 700K before taxes, $ 490K after taxes). The relationship ended abruptly and I had to decide what to do next in a fairly short period of time.

I had roughly $ 220K in dollars / after-tax assets, exactly 24 months of personal runway

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Here is a story that can be helpful in your endeavors.

When I was 26, I was working as an account executive at a growing technology company. The company produced $ 25MM in annual revenue at the time of my departure, up from $ 15MM just 2 years earlier. He had worked there for the past two years, earning more than 15% of the income output. I made $ 275K / year for 2.5 years ($ 700K before taxes, $ 490K after taxes). The relationship ended abruptly and I had to decide what to do next in a fairly short period of time.

I had roughly $ 220k in after-tax dollars / assets, exactly 24 months of personal runway before I went broke. Over time, I liquidated everything to maximize the personal track.

I contemplated navigating the world and living off practically nothing for 3 years and then going back and sorting things out with $ 150K in the bank. That would have been fun. This will continue to happen in the future. He contemplated living in a low-energy country in Central America and basically buying a property and living off the land. This would have been fun too. This will happen in the future. However, he was still not ready for both from a personal skill set point of view.

Fortunately, I was 26 years old and had been keeping an eye on my monthly expenses. I quickly lowered my spending budget from $ 8.5K / month to $ 5-6K / month.

Previously, I was able to buy / go anywhere I wanted for $ 8-10K / month for the last 3 years and I noticed that at $ 5-6K / month of living expenses, I was able to buy what I needed (organic food, keeping the same house of beach that just busy, same sports car), just couldn't travel / ski / race cars freely.

The funny thing is that the suffering increased enormously during the first 6 months, I learned a lot about myself. In hindsight, I am much simpler today and happiness levels rise the lower my budget / the more minimal my budget and lifestyle become.

Now he had 44 months of personal runway. However, this track calculation is done without investment in a new company.

Tried starting a mobile app company. We spent 8 months, we raised a total of $ 25K, we returned the $ 25K the day we decided to stop moving forward. Finding partners was difficult, finding engineers was difficult, finding investors was difficult. The worst part about all of this is that I was used to making $ 20K + / month and now my personal profit and loss were in the red every month.

He burned $ 50K of personal funds trying to start this company in addition to 8 months. 60% of my afternoons consisted of staying silent thinking about all the ways everything was going to crash. This was part of the problem (hard to imagine after having a successful mini-sales career).

$ 220K - $ 50K = $ 170K Living
expenses of $ 50K over an 8-month period
Total cash remaining $ 120K

20 months of personal track remaining at $ 6K / month of expenses, 12 months of personal track at $ 10K / month

I decided that I didn't have enough money to navigate the world now or move to a low-energy country in Central America. I had to go all out because I was "committed to marijuana."

Every waking hour for the past 6 months was used to read start-up / self-help / investment books and network with as many people as I aspired to be. Still, I had many nights when I thought the world was falling apart.

I started the second company, this time a consumer packaged well in the beverage space that was fashionable and that I was passionate about. This time, I was going to further support my all-in by leveraging and PG'ing the leveraged funding.

The credit was impeccable, he had no debt. Smart or not smart, he was going for it. I thought that worst case scenario, I would be living off the grid somewhere and trying to eat good food.

Credit cards, here they come. Of course, I had some credit cards with limits of $ 10-20K from the last 3 years, with zero balance / debt.

I decided that I was going to see how many 18-month 0% credit cards I could get and start the business with them to take advantage of my cash. The plan was to keep as much cash as I racked up debt. I kept a detailed personal balance of what I was comparing to cash / assets.

This was a good plan, but when it actually works, you're going to be "committed to marijuana" again and go over your head. If you're close to something and you're committed, statistically you have to keep doing it for it to be successful. If you quit, you lose. I almost went over my head. Almost keyword. If he had, he might have been fine in this particular situation, but he wasn't.

I was approved for 6 credit cards, all balances $ 10-15K, 0% interest for 18 months. Great, you now had access to $ 70,000 in capital at no cost for 18 months. Dangerous.

I went for it. This business plan was much more robust than the mobile app and the cash flowed immediately (into the plan).

The first start-up, I could not get investments. Partly because it was the first time I'd learned how to sell investments to qualified investors. Other factors included:

- acting like he was all-in but not all-in (he was a hungry young entrepreneur with $ 100-200K cash in the bank), which perhaps people might vibrately perceive
- not having paying clients (only signed clients they don't pay)
- no finished product
- no fundraising experience
- no paying
clients
- no paying clients - no paying clients

Don't go ahead with a business if you don't have paying customers after 8 months. Seriously. Unless it's a tech company with significant backing, it's likely to be a long way.

The second startup took 6 months to show any kind of real income ($ 10K + / month). At this rate, he was more confident about selling investments. We were able to see the growth before our eyes on a weekly / monthly basis.

I used Paypal to process the payroll and I used the cards, I paid as much as I could on the card for the first 6 months.

We invested between $ 20,000 and $ 30,000 in cash, but we were bleeding. Increased income, increased expenses, R&D that kills us ... bleeding badly. $ 15-20K per month in the red. I couldn't handle this on my own, we were going to sink.

My personal cash was down to $ 54K, 9 months burning down to $ 6K for monthly expenses. ($ 120K - $ 30K investment - $ 36K living expenses)

We had a windfall and raised some capital. It was more like breaking my ass for 70-80 hours a week for 6 months and finding the right investors, but we can also call it a windfall. The first money that entered was $ 160 thousand. Wow. This felt good. We could keep working the business and breathe. I received a guaranteed payment of $ 1.5K for 3 months (the only money I saw for 2 years).

It would take 6 more months for the business to show legs. Six months later, we had revenues of $ 30K / month and we were growing 15% month-over-month.

At that point, we had raised $ 400K and the company had ~ $ 50-100K at any point on the balance sheet.

There was a losing streak where we had less than $ 10K in cash and I had to invest another $ 10-15K. After that patch, the silver lining started to shine through.

I wanted to give up when we had less than $ 10,000 in cash. This was also the point where he had $ 30K in personal cash. I wrote a check for $ 10K and bit the bullet. Doing so showed my investors that I was hungrier than ever. So my investors matched my $ 10K with a big discount on stocks and we now had $ 25K in cash when the payroll came in. I personally had $ 20K and didn't see a paycheck ahead.

Today, we are far from "succeeding", but now we are at a RRR of $ 600K and we are breaking even. Investors are now approaching us and our growth is evident. We have a lot of work ahead of us, but it is more stable than ever. We're likely to raise another $ 100K in the next 60 days, but if we don't, the company is self-sufficient, which I think is important up front.

Self-sufficiency for a company is enormous. You can then choose your investors. You don't have to carry cash that you see. You can think deeply before acting. If you are sinking, you must carry cash to stay afloat.

At one point, we almost agreed to sell 30% of the company at a valuation of $ 700,000. Today, we have enough cash to earn $ 120K / mo income and raise a $ 2.5-3.5MM valuation. The 30% deal actually fell through; again, the rear view is 20-20. We wanted the deal because we were cash poor, but looking back we are very glad the deal didn't go through.

My personal cash went down as low as $ 17K. It basically started with $ 220,000 up to $ 17,000 over a 2-year period. $ 200K + down payment in 24 months. Oh!

I had a family member pass and did not receive any death assets. However, I received a life insurance benefit of $ 100,000. I would have been stressed over the remaining $ 10K in personal cash today, but am not stressed out with the insurance policy breakdown. I'm back at 30 months of personal track. It's interesting how time works when you need it.

All of this effort required more resources and effort than I ever imagined. This is also after working in or around 5+ startups since I was 17 years old and participating in each one until break-even or success.

The two startups that I personally endeavored on my own weren't high-budget, glitz, and glitz startups. This was starting up and making it happen, guerilla style. This was a difficult reality to swallow due to my previous earning capacity at such a young age.

Even with these low budget startups, the total investment was $ 200K +, including no payment for 2 years.

how old are you? Can you work on your startup from a remote area? Go to a low energy country like Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Thailand, etc. and work remotely for $ 500 / month. San Francisco and Southern California are not conducive to zero income for 2 years. Living expenses are high.

I'd say you need 24 months of personal gateway + $ 50K to quit your job and look for investment / full-time work in a startup.

If you can do this in a low-energy country, this could add up to $ 65K. High power input like AC and you're looking for $ 200K.

How quickly can you get customers and income? Nobody wants to invest in a company that can't show traction. Can you earn customers and income while working remotely to show traction? If so, this will help. Not only will this help, but it will also increase your valuation. You won't have to give up the farm for a $ 50,000 investment (you will if you have zero customers and zero income).

I'm not sure the end goal is to raise money or become a self-sustaining growth company. I've heard that companies that are forced to become self-sustaining end up outperforming the biggest rounds and profitability because they actually learned how to run and lead the business rather than cover it with cash raised.

You can do it. Think well and work hard. Don't go into debt. Go bankrupt but don't get into debt. Debt is like handcuffs. Those bad boys are hard to get rid of.

Best of luck.

Cheers to health

Historically, in the US, the ability to have health insurance was tied to working for a large employer like a factory. The old employer ideal of large corporations after World War II was to provide their employees with job security with a job for life, health care, and retirement income. That's why cities grew up around big industries like Ford Motor, or here in Denver, Gates Rubber. Many of these large corporations would even have their own clinics and medical staff.

That was great if you worked in a factory or in the mines. However, what if you wanted to become a business owner, work for yourself, be an entrepreneur?

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Historically, in the US, the ability to have health insurance was tied to working for a large employer like a factory. The old employer ideal of large corporations after World War II was to provide their employees with job security with a job for life, health care, and retirement income. That's why cities grew up around big industries like Ford Motor, or here in Denver, Gates Rubber. Many of these large corporations would even have their own clinics and medical staff.

That was great if you worked in a factory or in the mines. However, what if you wanted to become a business owner, work for yourself, be an entrepreneur? When I was growing up in the 1950s, my father owned his own business. We did not have health insurance. My mom went to the hospital four times to give birth. He paid out of pocket for each doctor's appointment, delivery, and subsequent pediatrician visits. It was a big reduction in the monthly budget, so it was a luxury that was used in moderation. Growing up, if we fell off our bikes, froze from not wearing our snow boots or got chicken pox, we stayed out of school for a few days and used home remedies. We never went to the doctor.

Until a few years ago, with the advent of the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare), the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, for most people, if you had health insurance, you would obtained through your employer; it was tied to having a job. No job, no health insurance. Individual policies didn't really exist for all practical purposes. If you could find one, it was tied to a pre-existing condition clause, so if you needed treatment for something you've had treatment for before in the last 5 years (or so), you wouldn't be covered. . If you needed mental health care, it was not covered. If you graduated from college and lost your health care from school and were unemployed, bad luck. It was a miserable situation. I lived it. He.

Today, if you want to be an entrepreneur, you can buy your own individual health insurance policy. State Health Insurance Exchange: State Exchanges without Preexisting Condition Clause. You and your employees choose the coverage you want and pay your own premiums. All of your employees can buy their own insurance and take their policies with them if they change jobs.

This is especially great for young people who are generally pretty healthy. Depending on your age, though, monthly premiums will cost roughly between $350-$950 month (ages 20's to early 60's) Careful though, don't confuse having insurance with having coverage. (huh?) The media often implies that if you have health insurance, then you have complete coverage for what ails you. You don't. Even with your individual policy, you will likely have an additional $2,500-$5,000 of out-of-pocket expenses per year if you use your insurance and visit specialists or have a hospitalization.

As an entrepreneur, sign up for a Health Savings Account Health Savings Accounts (HSAs) and gradually start savings the annual maximum allowable dollar amount for your out-of-pocket medical expenses. This will allow you to afford maximum health care benefits should something serious occur where you require a lot of medical care.

Absolutely. Though details are not provided, it is likely your health insurance plan will not provide coverage outside the US and Canada. Anyone traveling out of the country for an extended period of time should consider a travel health insurance plan.

Choosing a travel health/medical insurance plan involves knowing their benefits, matching them to your needs and then finding a quality program that fits your budget.

Important Considerations when Choosing a Travel Health Insurance Plan:

Defining Terms:

  • It is important to understand that the generic term "travel insurance" does not always include
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Absolutely. Although no details are provided, your health insurance plan may not provide coverage outside of the US and Canada. Anyone traveling out of the country for an extended period of time should consider a travel medical insurance plan.

Choosing a travel health / medical insurance plan involves knowing its benefits, tailoring them to your needs, and then finding a quality program that fits your budget.

Important considerations when choosing a travel health insurance plan:

Definition of terms:

  • It is important to understand that the generic term "travel insurance" does not always include travel medical / medical insurance.
  • Programs called “trip protection” and “trip cancellation protection” and even “trip accident” generally do not include coverage for many health and medical related emergencies.

Why is Travel Health/Medical coverage important?:

  • Many private health insurance companies and Medicare/Medicaid programs do not cover emergency treatment outside the US. Check with your plan to be sure.
  • Even if your health insurance plan will extend benefits out of country, coverage for repatriation and emergency evacuation may be missing.

Travel Health/Medical Insurance Features To Consider:

  • Does the policy provide coverage in the country(ies) I intend to travel?
    • This may be the first, critical question to ask as some plans only provide coverage to a subset of countries.
  • Does the policy cover injury and illness?
    • “Accident plans” do not cover illness. Some accident policies do not cover anything outside of accidental death or dismemberment of limbs or digits. It may be morbid to point this out, but an important consideration.
  • What Emergency Medical Coverage Limit does the plan include?
    • Emergency Medical coverage generally provides for medical treatment to the nearest appropriate facility.
    • Typically limits of $50,000 to $500,000 are available. Obviously, the higher the limit of coverage the better. Limits for Emergency Medical coverage can vary significantly between carriers.
  • Medical Evacuation and Repatriation
    • Depending on where you intend to travel, this coverage may be the most important consideration. Medical Repatriation arranges for a patient to return home to receive care.
    • Limits vary from $100,000 to $500,000 for this important benefit.

Travel Insurance Comparison Site:

SquareMouth .com provides one of the easiest ways to obtain quotes and compare the many different travel insurance plans available. In addition to pricing and benefit comparisons, SquareMouth offers reviews on the plans available. The site boasts over 36,000 Reviews on 114 Products from 21 Providers.

It’s your life & you have every right to turn down a job that you’re uncomfortable with. Never hesitate to stand up for yourself - well done! Inform the staffing agency the reasons you had to quit & that should be the end of it.

What do I have to do for a living? It is a question that everyone asks, from mature adolescents; to adults who have been laid off or quit smoking; and everyone in between looking for answers. It could be something you take for granted, such as a hobby, natural talent, skill, or special interest. Good advice can be helpful, but YOU, and only YOU, must make that decision, so it is always true.

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It is your life and you have every right to refuse a job that you feel uncomfortable with. Never hesitate to stand up for yourself, well done! Inform the staffing agency of the reasons you had to resign and that should be the end.

What should I do for a living? Is a question asked by everyone from mature teenagers; to adults who’ve been terminated or quit; & all those in between who are searching for answers. It could be something taken for granted such as a hobby, a natural talent, ability or special interest. Sound advice can be helpful, but YOU & only YOU, must make that decision so always trust your gut. Nothing’s more depressing than tolerating a job you despise. The key to a happier & rewarding life is making a living doing what you REALLY want to do & not what you HAVE to do. It’s a high-tech world that’s getting smaller & education is vital! Working 8–hour days, day after day, week after week, month after month, etc. — choose wisely — because you might as well do what you enjoy.

It is a form of entrapment — yes — but there are a host of fiscal benefits that employers derive from employer sponsored insurance. Two of the biggest are:

  • Local, state and federal tax exclusions. This is really a form of corporate welfare (in that the local, state and federal governments don’t see this revenue) and it amounts to about $600 billion — per year.
  • It also helps to keep wages artificially depressed.

In fact, there’s a longer list of reasons we need to end Employer Sponsored Insurance … 10 Reasons Why Employers -- And New Ventures -- Won't 'Disrupt' U.S. Healthcare

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