How do I tell my boss that my resignation letter was just a way to push for more pay and not really quit? They are taking it seriously.

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Sterling Saunders



How do I tell my boss that my resignation letter was just a way to push for more pay and not really quit? They are taking it seriously.

How do I tell my boss that my resignation letter was just a way to push for more pay and not really quit? They are taking it seriously.

Edit / Note: If you want to leave your own answer, for any question, go to the question and leave an answer. Do not leave answers as comments on another answer. He is quite inconsiderate and shows a lack of effort to understand where he is making a comment.

I have disabled comments here because most of the notices I get are for people who are writing their own answers or criticizing the person who asked the question. Even after I added a note

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How do I tell my boss that my resignation letter was just a way to push for more pay and not really quit? They are taking it seriously.

Edit / Note: If you want to leave your own answer, for any question, go to the question and leave an answer. Do not leave answers as comments on another answer. He is quite inconsiderate and shows a lack of effort to understand where he is making a comment.

I have disabled comments here because most of the notices I get are for people who are writing their own answers or criticizing the person who asked the question. Even after I add an endnote on this, people who don't even bother to read it ignorantly keep putting responses as comments.

Please folks, find out if you are trying to talk to the person asking the question or the person who wrote an answer.


My answer:

Sadly, I see a lot of answers that are quite critical and critical. Some are sarcastic or start out friendly, then turn around. (Sometimes I think people use questions like this more as an opportunity to practice writing skills or ways to knock people down than to reach out and help.)

Let's analyze it. Soon:

  1. You wanted a higher salary
  2. To achieve this, you wrote a letter of resignation.
  3. Your boss took it seriously
  4. Your employer now expects you to leave

So let's examine the possible results:

First, what you want to do is explain to your boss why you wrote that letter. Let's see what can happen to that. How will your boss react? Sometimes it helps to think, "How would you react?" Remember, though, in this case, your reactions will lean more towards what you want to happen than what they are likely to do. So you tell your boss. He might say, “Okay. We'll throw it away. "But you've probably already told HR and anyone else involved. Even if it's a small business, you're still at least the business owner or your boss. How will they respond when they hear you did it alone? to negotiate a higher salary?

They have already started planning their departure. When I tell you, I know you would like them to say, “Oh, we get it. You can keep your job, we like to work with you ”, but the chances of them saying that are slim. Even if they do, their relationship at the company will have changed.

The first thing they will think is that the letter was a lie. They will not see it as a hoax, but as if he wrote something that was not true.

I am not trying to give you a hard time, but it is important to understand how you will view this event. They took your letter at face value. They had no reason not to. Think about it: you wanted them to think, "Oh, he's going away, so let's pay more." So you fulfilled half of your intention: they took it seriously. The bad news is that instead of trying to make you stay, they decided to let you go. (So, I wanted them to take it seriously, I just wanted them to respond differently than they did.)

From their point of view, you wrote something and they took it at face value. If you tell them, "I didn't mean to do that," then from now on, whatever you tell them, they'll wonder if that's what you mean or if you're just trying to get them to do something. specific. It will be extremely difficult for them to trust you from now on.

If they let you stay, they will probably keep looking for a replacement for your position. Even if you don't, they just aren't going to trust you now like they did before.

With that in mind, do you want to continue working there? Do you want to work somewhere where the boss wonders whether he should trust you or not? You were trusted by default, but now you've earned mistrust. That puts you in a bad position if you stay there.

Second, you can lie to them and say, “The other job failed. Can I stay? "You may think it is a smart way to solve the problem and stay in your job, but it is very likely that they will say," We are already in the hiring process. "Also, if they ever find out, somehow , which was a hoax, they will trust you even less than if you just tried to explain it to them.

Third, and all of the above leads to this, you can go ahead, find a new job, and leave. If you don't, then your boss won't value you like they used to. The best thing to do is understand that it was not wise, that it would have been better to negotiate with them directly.

You might consider talking to your boss and saying, "Things didn't go according to plan, so would you consider writing a reference for me?" You may be lucky enough to get a letter of reference. At this point, if you get a good reference from them, that's all you can hope for within the bounds of reason. Even if they let you stay, they are not going to trust you and will plan to replace you ASAP.


Addendum: David Stafford pointed out something he wishes he had included. If his boss wanted to retain him, he would have started negotiating. He didn't, so the company wasn't that keen on keeping the person. That's another reason you need to go ahead and quit that job. If they really wanted to stay with him, they would have talked to him about it.


Another thought: There are a series of questions on Quora that address the topic of what to do if you get a job offer and tell your boss, and he gives you a counter offer. You may want to look up these questions. The consensus is that if you get a good offer and you tell your boss and they counter offer, no matter how good it is, you better leave. Your boss knows, at the time, that you are looking for other jobs or thinking of quitting. They don't know how long you'll stay or how long it will take to get a better offer, so they can act like they want you to stay. However, the truth is that they basically want you to stay until they can replace you.

With that in mind, saying you've found a better position or are thinking of leaving is a negotiating tactic that will almost always make things worse for you.


EDIT: Please PLEASE note that this is one of many answers to this question. When you comment on it, you are answering the answer and not the question. If you have an answer to the original question, write it as an answer or comment on the question. I, as the author of this answer, am NOT the person who asked the question and not someone who would attempt to mislead an employer in the manner described.

As a former hiring manager and employee who applied for and received each of the requested raises, I feel I have enough experience to respond. The answer to your question: it is not. Don't tell them you wrote a letter that was not sincere, especially one about quitting. Imagine standing in your employer's shoes and hearing, "I really didn't mean that, I was just hoping you would get the hint and pay me more." As a manager, that would really bother me. I would feel like you are provoking me and would happily let you go, especially if your position fills up easily. Most are.

If you want

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As a former hiring manager and employee who applied for and received each of the requested raises, I feel I have enough experience to respond. The answer to your question: it is not. Don't tell them you wrote a letter that was not sincere, especially one about quitting. Imagine standing in your employer's shoes and hearing, "I really didn't mean that, I was just hoping you would get the hint and pay me more." As a manager, that would really bother me. I would feel like you are provoking me and would happily let you go, especially if your position fills up easily. Most are.

If you want to stay, look (actively, don't wait) for an opportune moment to mention that you would consider staying if they can outbid the other offer (even if there is no offer - at this point by giving a false resignation we have already breached the honesty policy).

My first piece of advice to keep going is to be clear and direct. You basically gave them an ultimatum without letting them know what was at stake. Nobody is a mind reader. After receiving your letter, hopefully they love you so much that they will immediately offer to pay you more if you stay. Most likely I think that if you write a letter indicating that you will quit smoking, most will believe you.

My second tip is to ask for a raise. I know it's intimidating and honestly, unless you've been there for at least a year, I wouldn't even try. But if you deserve it, your employer knows it's coming (or happily wonders why you haven't asked yet). Be prepared for a no if you don't have a reason. Appearing for x number of days / years is not a very good reason and / or does not justify a large increase; you are expected to attend to get paid what you are currently being paid.

When I ask for raises, I have facts and figures ready. As a hiring manager, my proof of deserving a raise included some quantifiable factors. Usually this was how many people I hired and retained in x amount of time, how many new clients I got in x number of days, what this has done with earnings and any other extras, above and beyond, no including tasks like my-job-description that I have done. When it was in sales it was similar; how many sales have I made now compared to then, how much more money did I make with my boss. I also mention any defects or lack of performance, and what I have been doing and will do to correct it. Show why you are worth it. My bosses are usually quite impressed with the preparation and, in the end, they have very few options, Unless they want me to go In which case, you can bring your information well prepared to the next interview.

Go ahead and hang on! None of it is worth the stress, or all the hatred of the Quorans.

I have had this exact situation with an employee. We conducted your review and showed you that even though your performance was not up to scratch, we were offering you territory that would allow you to perform well and grow within the company.

He misunderstood (I think), which means we thought he was the only one who could do this and tried to negotiate a raise (also based on misinformation from a headhunter). We refused, and therefore he thought he would try to corner us in a situation where his threat to leave would make us change our minds.

That did not happen. But unfortunately he started the

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I have had this exact situation with an employee. We conducted your review and showed you that even though your performance was not up to scratch, we were offering you territory that would allow you to perform well and grow within the company.

He misunderstood (I think), which means we thought he was the only one who could do this and tried to negotiate a raise (also based on misinformation from a headhunter). We refused, and therefore he thought he would try to corner us in a situation where his threat to leave would make us change our minds.

That did not happen. But, unfortunately, he started the ploy and had to keep supporting it. We could feel that he didn't want to leave, because instead of accepting our rejection, he kept suggesting how we were making a big mistake by not agreeing to his terms, that he was the best and we would regret it. In the end, when that didn't work out, it started to get personal and he wondered how we could look in the mirror, that when we were so profitable we weren't giving him what he thought he deserved.

Now let's say you had decided to withdraw your resignation; It was already presented as a flight risk for us. No employer wants an employee who leaves in search of a better opportunity, and we can often live in denial that this happens. However, that threat is never real, until someone posts a resignation letter.

Then everything changes.

The relationship between you and the employee is fundamentally based on trust. The moment a tactic like this is used, that confidence is damaged or at least stretched to near the breaking point.

The employer will assume that you are always looking to leave and therefore will avoid giving you more responsibility because you will run the risk of flight. When you have less responsibility, unconsciously, you will be left out of the process and feel like you are being denied the opportunity. Eventually you will leave and would have wasted everyone's time in the process.

The only suggestion I can offer as an employer is to be honest. That goes a long way in trying to repair trust with your employer. Yes, he may be the kind that looks bad and talks to you, in which case you might consider whether you want to work with him. However, if he appreciates your honesty, he may be willing to give you a second chance.

While it will still seem like a flight risk, your honesty about your enjoyment of such work and your commitment to advancing the business can at least put you in a good position.

Good luck.

Oh my oh my oh my… The innocence and ignorance of youth!

WHAT THE HELL WERE YOU THINKING?

Where were your friends and parents when you put the stamp on that letter?

You didn't realize that employers pay you to use it. Unless there are barriers to entering your level of knowledge… experience or skill, then you are expendable and infinitely replaceable… often with a cheaper candidate for your job.

There is no loyalty beyond the pay package.

Before quitting or leaving a job, it is always wise to have a job to go to. It acts as a safety net or as leverage and justification if you want a

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Oh my oh my oh my… The innocence and ignorance of youth!

WHAT THE HELL WERE YOU THINKING?

Where were your friends and parents when you put the stamp on that letter?

You didn't realize that employers pay you to use it. Unless there are barriers to entering your level of knowledge… experience or skill, then you are expendable and infinitely replaceable… often with a cheaper candidate for your job.

There is no loyalty beyond the pay package.

Before quitting or leaving a job, it is always wise to have a job to go to. It acts as a safety net or leverage and justification if you want a raise. The promised salary from your new job proves your point that you don't get paid. Your employer then has the option to stop paying you and raise your salary or to let you go and find another desperate fool to employ in your place with the low salary you no longer wish to bear.

Over time, inflation erodes the value of the currency. In 10 years, the value of your currency will be cut in half due to inflation. That is why annual salary reviews are essential. An annual increase of 1 or 2 percent is common to adjust for expected inflation. This is a fact and does not need justification for employers or aggressive attempts at leverage such as threats of resignation.

To justify a salary increase that far exceeds inflation, it was necessary to justify its greater value to the company.

Are you in possession of a recently awarded degree in economics that has significantly enriched your employer's business? Did you get a degree in chemical engineering that allows you to join the research team and find new drug treatments to sell to the world? These are examples of significant increases in your economic value to a business. If you're in sales ... did you show that you consistently and significantly outsold your counterpart sales team because of your magnetic personality?

If not, besides loving yourself ... why do you think you are such a popular product? Your employer disagrees. Perhaps now you can make the point clear to him before he loses the additional income that your job brought him.

You do not know? I can not say it? ……

In that case, it is obvious that you are of no value to your business. The best thing to do ... if you don't have a job to go to ... is to have a private meeting with the person you quit and humbly confess your mistake. Telling them privately that you just wanted a raise and was wrong about the way you did it.

There is a possibility that your boss is a human being and understands that there was no animosity in his intention that his ego would force him to rise to the occasion by brutally calling his bluff.

If you seem devastated and humble enough and explain your motives well enough, there is a chance that you will save yourself the trouble of placing an ad instead.

Adding humiliation to unemployment is not a big deal and is worth the risk as it will be one on one and will avoid much of the embarrassment and humiliation, as well as the stark consequences of not having a salary.

Employers create their wealth by using workers to get the job done while organizing the 'great capitalist fraud' by arranging to legally divert the profits you all create to enrich yourself at the expense of your quality of life and the erosion of your life chances. This is life.

Proof of this are the vacations abroad they take ... the villas in the Mediterranean ... the beachfront houses ... the yachts they own but never sail on ... the small planes hidden in the hangars from the rural airfields that never fly.

Look at your watch and your shoes. These are dead indications as to wealth and spending legally diverted at your expense.

Hope you get an idea now. If you are unlucky enough to get laid off so your employer can save money with your cheapest replacement ... then use unemployment time to sit back and rethink your situation.

Perhaps you will study further to raise your level of experience and create barriers to competition from other job applicants. Remember ... no employer is interested in you having a degree in English, history, etc. Your new qualifications should be vocational and useful in the workplace, distinguishing you from the competition.

Perhaps the world of work is a waste of your life. I didn't gain anything by chasing moonbeams. I have arthritis in all joints and lung problems from breathing dirt to prove it. I would have had a better chance leaving the UK and risking it as a penniless chancer in the 70s by going to Spain to live and work in the sun and find opportunities there, for example.

Now you have to think a lot about the life you want to live. Put aside the propaganda of the stereotypes of work and society and ask yourself what you want your life to be like. We create our own opportunities and life experiences and if you don't exceed your intellectual capabilities with your ambition ... then you can be successful. You may have to acquire skill and skill to do so or take a leap of faith into the abyss.

These are Jeffrey's random thoughts. Good luck!

Look, if you write a resignation letter, you should be good to go. It is not a good bargaining chip, because there is a high probability that you will leave the company soon, no matter what happens next.

If you want to boost the salary, you must have an open discussion with your manager. If it is a well-run company, they will listen to you. If not, well, it might be a good time to go anyway.

I flatly asked my manager if he was willing to be a reference for me as I was planning on looking for a new job. I meant it 100%. I expressly told management that I was not in a hurry and that I would stay

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Look, if you write a resignation letter, you should be good to go. It is not a good bargaining chip, because there is a high probability that you will leave the company soon, no matter what happens next.

If you want to boost the salary, you must have an open discussion with your manager. If it is a well-run company, they will listen to you. If not, well, it might be a good time to go anyway.

I flatly asked my manager if he was willing to be a reference for me as I was planning on looking for a new job. I meant it 100%. I expressly told management that I was in no rush and would keep them posted on any developments. I am quite picky about the positions I would consider applying for, so a few months later management came up to me and said they wanted to keep me and asked what it would take to be happy. I hadn't applied for any new jobs (because, again, I'm quite picky), so we were able to come to an agreement on something that everyone could be happy with.

I played 100% open cards and therefore did not lose the trust of my managers.

One thing that very few people seem to understand is that you cannot lose if you are honest about your actions and intentions. If the company doesn't like it, hell, you probably don't want to work there anyway. They will probably never offer fair compensation or a worthwhile career. If you are a well-run company and you are a valued employee, your concerns will be listened to.

My story is a little different but very close. I was working in a store and I was very happy working there and I loved my boss. The store across the street offered me a job making about $ 6,000 more a year. The benefits were identical and seemed to be a lot. I told my boss that I was going to accept the job and I was giving him two weeks' notice before my departure. He told me that he fully understood it and wished me the best.

As the date approached, I noticed that my wife and I had scheduled a vacation and she was unable to change her date. So I crossed the street and explained to my new pro

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My story is a little different but very close. I was working in a store and I was very happy working there and I loved my boss. The store across the street offered me a job making about $ 6,000 more a year. The benefits were identical and seemed to be a lot. I told my boss that I was going to accept the job and I was giving him two weeks' notice before my departure. He told me that he fully understood it and wished me the best.

As the date approached, I noticed that my wife and I had scheduled a vacation and she was unable to change her date. So I crossed the street and explained to my potential new boss that I would have to start 30 days instead of the 15 days notice I had given him. He was very angry and said you mean you will start on June 1st and not May 15th. I said yes, that is correct and explained the reason for my change. At that moment he was furious. He continued to enthuse that he would start May 1 or not be employed.

Then I turned to him and thanked him for the offer and hoped he didn't have any hard feelings. Then I left his office, crossed the street, and told my current boss that I would stay if that was okay. He said "grab your apron and get to work." with a smile on his face. We worked together for another 10 years.

The company was bought by another company. The store across the street closed about 3 years after I decided not to go to work there. I knew that if the new boss and I couldn't set a start date, the road ahead was going to be pretty bumpy. It was one of the best decisions of my life. A few months after returning to work in the same place, I was offered a management position with the benefit of a company vehicle and a higher salary. I would say it was the good favor I had with my company and the inability of the other manager to work with his employees. Best of luck.

A friend of mine did the same as you and had later thoughts. As an HR professional, I was very disappointed that she reacted and didn't take the time to talk about things. His boss was unwilling to give in to his bad judgment and had to find another job.

This is my thought: it is clear that you have changed your mind and want to recover from a very bad decision. I don't think lying is a very good thing and can come back to haunt you. The truth is that while you feel uncomfortable now and fear that your employer will take your letter seriously, I would recommend

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A friend of mine did the same as you and had later thoughts. As an HR professional, I was very disappointed that she reacted and didn't take the time to talk about things. His boss was unwilling to give in to his bad judgment and had to find another job.

This is my thought: it is clear that you have changed your mind and want to recover from a very bad decision. I don't think lying is a very good thing and can come back to haunt you. The truth is that while you feel uncomfortable now and fear that your employer will take your letter seriously, I recommend the following: Schedule time with your manager immediately and speak directly to him, not about the risky game you played, but about it. fact that you have had doubts and would like to retract the letter of resignation, in the hope that it will support your request. You should provide a compelling conversation about why you felt it was best for you to quit and what made you change your mind. Talking about this trick would be suicide

On your need for a raise: As long as you can resume your work, you may have placed a bullseye on your back. Work hard and think about what else you can do to make yourself loved and indispensable, whenever possible. Before your next assessment, do some homework about what the people who do their jobs get paid (Salary.com - Unlock the Power of Pay, glassdoor.com, etc.) to understand what the market thinks. You can tell your boss that you are interested in working for a salary increase and request a registration after 3 months, to find out if you are on target or wait for your next scheduled evaluation. If you don't know what the salary range of your job classification is, go to your human resources department and ask what the base and top salary numbers are.

So this is my advice to you

I once had a job and was inadvertently offered a higher paying job that I wasn't really looking for. But he was also a manager who worked hard day after day at my job, but he also knew that the grass is not always greener on the other side. So I didn't want my employer to find out and fire me for it, so I told him that I was offered this job that I was not looking for and they offered me so much and I wondered if I was staying here. anyway i could earn more instead of taking the other job and yes i got paid. Also if you want ge

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So this is my advice to you

I once had a job and was inadvertently offered a higher paying job that I wasn't really looking for. But he was also a manager who worked hard day after day at my job, but he also knew that the grass is not always greener on the other side. So I didn't want my employer to find out and fire me for it, so I told him that I was offered this job that I was not looking for and they offered me so much and I wondered if I was staying here. anyway i could earn more instead of taking the other job and yes i got paid. Also, if you want to get a raise, the best way to do that is NOT to resign once you deliver a resignation letter, they DO NOT have to keep you employed because they already have to make arrangements to replace your position and they do it BEFORE you leave. if they are in any way responsible, especially if that's just one of that position and then they know the license date they interview and then they tell them their start date. So they may already have someone ready in your place and you may not know it. So if that's the case then you won't be able to stay because you've been replaced, everyone in any job can be replaced. In my situation I was not in the position to run the business, but I did everything and something else.

"If it was anyone, I would pay them what we pay, but you've always been working harder and also doing a better job than ANY of the employees" and he's talking to his boss to get my husband to raise or at least try. to get him a hat raise because he has earned it more than he has.

people automatically think nowadays that they are irreplaceable and that they deserve more. So if you are honest with yourself, then you ask yourself this. Are you worthy of what you ask for? Are you going further? Is he worth more than other people or does he do exactly what he has to do and nothing else? Do you miss work? Do you cover someone if they need it? And then some other questions, this is all important when you are asking for a raise, it's not just that you've been there X amount of time, so you deserve to earn more.

I think by putting up a resignation letter just to pick it up instead of talking to the boss, the boss will probably tell you to technically go on that day that you are no longer an employee. The ONLY hope you have is to tell your boss these abs, make sure you do it VERY professionally.

I submitted a letter of resignation for this day and would like to speak with you about it. I would like to speak with you about continuing my employment here, as I already posted the letter on

If the boss says yes, the next thing to do is tell them that you don't want to leave the company but feel like you deserve more pay and maybe I can discuss with you why I think abs feel like I deserve more pay.

That's what I would do BUT at the same time and not knowing the OP as a person makes Answers like this very very difficult so you have to be ready to accept the no from bosses and criticism on how you are as an employee. If your boss says that you need to get better at these things first, then you need to be an honorable person and try to fix those things instead of giving them up again and they may say no as you had already written the letter.

that's my advice to you and I hope it helps you

Well my story is a bit strange, my boss Mr. Anondo Bhoyonkar Bandopadhyay was a curious case. He used to train the CEOs of our company through me. Although our company did not have a CEO, it did have a few directors. I could understand all his tricks and ticks since I was in a differentiated orbital much higher intellectually than him, but I never complained, since I don't know why I had such great love and respect for that person, perhaps while working. generated.

He used to design various tests for me, where I was a guinea pig from a biological laboratory, almost like the story in the movie Pr

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Well my story is a bit strange, my boss Mr. Anondo Bhoyonkar Bandopadhyay was a curious case. He used to train the CEOs of our company through me. Although our company did not have a CEO, it did have a few directors. I could understand all his tricks and ticks since I was in a differentiated orbital much higher intellectually than him, but I never complained, since I don't know why I had such great love and respect for that person, perhaps while working. generated.

He used to design various tests for me, where I was a guinea pig from a biological laboratory, almost like the story in the movie Predator, 2010. After each test, I used to give lessons to senior management, on what to do. and it should not be done. the game, etc. Sometimes I tend to act as if things were new to me (nothing was new for me already faced or such a situation was familiar to me), I am horrified (I have never been horrified or scared), I am learning new things (not learning anything new, what I knew everything including their experiment design), many times their experiment used to go away while, that's why I usually take them to tracks so that the intention with which I wanted the results is fulfilled, and that is where everything went wrong. As I was sending him signals of encouragement, he began to improve his experiments with more vigor and confidence. and as a consequence of the same, the price I had to give was my job. Over time his experimentation grew, almost after 10 months, he handed me a letter of dismissal, I was completely surprised by his act. He became very unmotivated, emotionally despondent, unable to bear failure sportingly, sank into depression for several months, received revival medication, and was finally shown the door. Never give a great interpreter a letter of dismissal, give him reason for demonstration, suspension and others, but not a letter of dismissal. I thought he was experimenting, he would reverse his decision in the early morning, but to date, he has not. I'm still looking forward to the same ……. He was very unmotivated, emotionally depressed, He could not bear failure in a sporting way, he sank into depression for several months, received revival medication, and was finally shown the door. Never give a great interpreter a letter of dismissal, give him reason for demonstration, suspension and others, but not a letter of dismissal. I thought he was experimenting, he would reverse his decision in the early morning, but to date, he has not. I'm still looking forward to the same ……. He became very unmotivated, emotionally despondent, unable to bear failure sportingly, sank into depression for several months, received revival medication, and was finally shown the door. Never give a great interpreter a letter of dismissal, give him reason for demonstration, suspension and others, but not a letter of dismissal. I thought I was experimenting he would reverse his decision at dawn, but to date, he has not. I'm still looking forward to the same …….

I thought you wanted Mr. Yes Roy, principal, to be called "good-hearted." Well, I knew that Mr. Yes Roy was not only "good-natured" but that he is as simple as a baby. But because I ? I am a simple person with high thinking, want to live a godly life. I am "Nobody", a "person without a face". Who am I to tell you this? I do not want to be "Demi-God" nor do I want to insult Mr. Yes Roy by commenting on him with idioms that could be a minor description of a good and humble being. I always wanted to be a professional, so I did not succumb to the pressure that was exerted on me. There were "gonesh preserve", "boron gonesh", "Pagla Dr. Khatua", etc., they could have turned them into the goat. Because I !!!

I had the uncanny ability to judge people the first day I met or spoke to anyone. He knew that Mr. Anondo Bhoyonkar Bondopadhyay was a good person, as was Mr. Yes Roy, the founder of his father and his peers, Mr. So Roy, Mr. Taklu Ghosh and last but not least important, Mr. Aashik Tipathy.

Returning to the original problem of resignation, I was forced to do so, I offered it until the last day on the advice of Mr. YR, since I asked for a relief letter. I was handed a termination letter, which was as good as a failed report card for me. To date I am dealing with it, since the day they gave me I could not sleep well at night, it is a nightmare for me. Why did they fire me? And on top of that without any clause or reason. A false reason was written for clause 10, which does not mean anything.

Yes, it was true that I want a raise, who does not want a raise that is also legitimate, but I never told anyone or threatened to resign for the same reason. It was beyond my dignity. If my parents ever hear that I have threatened to quit because of salary, they will die first instead of listening to it. I was born and raised in a famous zamindar family from Barisal, the great house of the Barisal mukherji, “Aste sal jaite sal tar e nam borisal”. Therefore, money was always a secondary option for us.

My organization promised me an 80% raise plus a high incentive with promotion after 3 months, 6 months passed and nothing was offered. The tenth dismissal letter was subsequently delivered. Strange. Totally unprofessional.

They didn't give me the raise due while I joined, they didn't give me my award as an incentive for solar energy, for cost reduction. Now they spent 11 months less income…. who will compensate for all my financial needs. My emotional needs …….

I've been in serious trouble since ……….

Disclaimer: I have annotated this article after hearing it from horse's mouth. It is a true story with fictional characters, so read with the mind of reading a story, read a real life experience, please don't take it by heart or mind and get depressed.

How do I tell my boss that my resignation letter was just a way to push for more pay and not really quit?

Present this in: Stable Door Locking Strategies, Part Two: Placing Screws in the Post.

"How do I tell my boss that ..."

First, you should have found out exactly what you wanted from your employer before sending a letter.

Next, you should have told your employer exactly what you wanted, along with a bit of "why" - where it would have taken you professionally and what benefits you may have accrued for the employer by playing along and providing what you wanted. for good measure.

My resignation

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How do I tell my boss that my resignation letter was just a way to push for more pay and not really quit?

Present this in: Stable Door Locking Strategies, Part Two: Placing Screws in the Post.

"How do I tell my boss that ..."

First, you should have found out exactly what you wanted from your employer before sending a letter.

Next, you should have told your employer exactly what you wanted, along with a bit of "why" - where it would have taken you professionally and what benefits you may have accrued for the employer by playing along and providing what you wanted. for good measure.

"My resignation letter was just a way of pushing for more salary and not quitting"

Oh. Well that's something quite different. With that being the case, this is where you will find that you have booked a first-class one-way ticket on the express nonstop service to Major Fuckupsville.

If you wanted more money, you could have said how much you wanted (maybe it's best to save it for later, in a face-to-face meeting), but you certainly should have said why you thought you deserved a raise, and what the company I could have won with it.

"They are taking it seriously"

Well, of course they are: you sent a letter of resignation!

What did you think they would do?

Fold it into a paper hat, then take turns wearing it to the office before presenting you with a cake while someone throws streamers while someone opens a bottle of Prosecco?

But you already know all this: everything is a bit 811; too little too late; your own firecracker has been used to move it to the lift position; 20:20 hindsight; one is always wiser after the fact; It seems like you've inadvertently gotten a little upset here, buddy, etc., ad nauseam.

What you really need, of course, are stable door locking strategies, part one: pre-mounting bolting. But we can keep that until there's another horse.

You can say it, but you just sent your career with them to hell. You played games with a very serious work aspect and you lose. Period.

What he does not show in his actions is confidence. Until your stupid choice, you trusted them to have a position for you. They trusted you to work their position and would pay you what they contractually agreed to pay. Your resignation, in an attempt to get more pay, violates that contract between you and the company. No matter how well you performed in your position, you violated the trust of that contract.

You are, or were, an e

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You can say it, but you just sent your career with them to hell. You played games with a very serious work aspect and you lose. Period.

What he does not show in his actions is confidence. Until your stupid choice, you trusted them to have a position for you. They trusted you to work their position and would pay you what they contractually agreed to pay. Your resignation, in an attempt to get more pay, violates that contract between you and the company. No matter how well you performed in your position, you violated the trust of that contract.

Is, or was, an employee. You don't run the business. You control nothing but your attitude and your performance at your job. You have no right to tell the business how to operate. You do not have the right to impose salary increases. You are not entitled to anything except the opportunity for a position that managers believe was qualified, and apparently performed satisfactorily, to help advance the future of the company. Now, all you have left to control is your attitude. You just controlled yourself and lost your job.

You are not trustworthy. If you are still working there, then they are being extremely nice to you, a measure of their appreciation. Usually with a trick like the one you did, a security officer would visit you, give you a box, and encourage you to pack up and leave right away. Everything you put in the box will be analyzed to determine if it is business or personal property. Any questions are resolved in favor of the business. Then you will be escorted to the door, you will carry your things, and there security may hold the door open to expedite your departure. Once you get out, you'll be gone. Turn around and you will see the door guarded by the security guard to prevent you from returning. They know they can no longer trust you.

Good luck finding another job; at least you will be older and wiser. And keep in mind that they are doing you a favor. If they kept you, their antics would become part of their record. Anyone asking for a referral will find that record and it could be part of the "recommendation." In this way they only report that he resigned. No further comments are required. You have the opportunity to invent your own scenario, truthful or not. That is something you have control over.

NOTE:

Katt Wilm graciously edited my fingers and spell corrections from too many late-night Quora sessions. I really appreciate the corrections and insightful findings. Obviously he was too tired to correct. Thanks.

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