How do I respond "tell me about yourself" as a B.Com graduate when applying for a web developer job?

Updated on : December 7, 2021 by Benjamin Francis



How do I respond "tell me about yourself" as a B.Com graduate when applying for a web developer job?

There is no relationship between "Tell me about yourself" and "Web development".

The fact that most people ask about you is to understand what stage of life you have gone through and in what way. This has to do directly with the jobs they will provide you. The job demands a new you. Correct ! Of course. You need to do your best. Generally, a person with "grabs things quickly" and works faster with good results.

The point NOW is whether it makes any sense to talk about ourselves, which is not yours. So this remains the same. Now what matters, above all, is how you describe it.

Web industry or any industry in the sense, wi

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There is no relationship between "Tell me about yourself" and "Web development".

The fact that most people ask about you is to understand what stage of life you have gone through and in what way. This has to do directly with the jobs they will provide you. The job demands a new you. Correct ! Of course. You need to do your best. Generally, a person with "grabs things quickly" and works faster with good results.

The point NOW is whether it makes any sense to talk about ourselves, which is not yours. So this remains the same. Now what matters, above all, is how you describe it.

The web industry, or any industry in the sense, will focus more on its technical aspects. It's like capturing the keywords in your paragraphs or sentences.

It is better to start. . .

  1. The latest technology and achievements in web development. If you are cooler, try to show that you can be a great advantage to them.
  2. Then describe the things that you are good at (things related to technology).
  3. Tell them how you came to choose this field. What has motivated you to choose this file (this is the most complicated), since the interviewer will get to know your priorities and decisions that you make in your life.
  4. Try to use more content with fewer words. Remember that timing is everything and the interviewer is not interested in the story, they are interested in the facts.
  5. Make it precise.

Thanks

This is Gourav Sharma

  1. Don't undermine your BCom title. You may be asked to do so at the interview, if the interviewer is trying to act smart.
  2. Review your financial fundamentals before the interview. You may be expected to have an overview of the financial situation globally, so you should know this during the time of the interview.
  3. Some of my friends at B.Com earn a lot after 8-10 years of IT careers. So the degree doesn't matter in the IT industry.
  4. Stop worrying, start preparing for your interviews. The more you prepare for mock interviews, the better your chances.

Tell them what you are ... what makes you choose web development as a career and the effort you have put into it! that's enough! If you have a true passion for programming and have developed some of the necessary skills, you will get the job!

Look at "Tell me about yourself" like an icebreaker. A chat session of a few minutes to eliminate any discomfort that may exist when two strangers meet for the first time in a stressful situation. It can shed light on the direction of the interview.

Here is a summary of my usual answer.
What I do, where I am now. What wonderful things I am working on.
How did I get there? Why did I get there? What wonderful things I did.
A comment on a couple of amazing things I've done.
A line about early life, school, college, additional activities.
What wonderful things I love to do when I'm not great

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Look at "Tell me about yourself" like an icebreaker. A chat session of a few minutes to eliminate any discomfort that may exist when two strangers meet for the first time in a stressful situation. It can shed light on the direction of the interview.

Here is a summary of my usual answer.
What I do, where I am now. What wonderful things I am working on.
How did I get there? Why did I get there? What wonderful things I did.
A comment on a couple of amazing things I've done.
A line about early life, school, college, additional activities.
What amazing things I love to do when I'm not doing amazing things at work.

This shouldn't seem like a rehearsed dialogue. This shouldn't be totally spontaneous, so you will have to put in too many fillers. Don't get carried away by enthusiasm. Do not be boring.

Here is an example (not my data). You may fit into Computer Science terminologies from your experience.
I am John, a second year graduate student at Hogwarts University. I currently work with Professor Snape and my postgraduate research is related to experimenting with the effects of non-bitter healing potions on energy levels in humans. During this project, I learned about advanced statistics, pattern recognition, and used HTML / CSS for the data entry front-end, MongoDB for the backend storage, and R language for data analysis. I also participated in a research project on the development of a potion to heal burns from the fire of Mordor with Professor Gandalf from the Middle-earth Research Center.

I have been excited about open source. During my undergraduate years at Westeros State University, I have contributed to a popular CMS that is being used by government entities such as the official website for Kings Landing and corporations such as Wayne Enterprises. I was part of the organizing body of a national programming contest. I was also selected in Google's Summer of Code but couldn't commit to it as I won a 2 day trip to Mordor which was a great opportunity to experience the world and expand my horizon. I spent my early years in South Park, Colorado and used to participate in the annual enactment of Civil War. I also love to read, play the guitar, and dress up as Eric Cartman for fun.

All recruiters have asked this question almost every time they meet a new candidate. You shake hands, they ask you to sit down. You sit and smile. They ask this question. You begin,

"Hello. My name is ___. I currently work at ____ as ____. My education credentials include ........."

<BORING>

They somehow keep their smile and wait for you to finish while you speak whatever comes to mind at the time.

This is not the correct way to start a conversation.

Rather than a formal introduction, think of your two-minute response as a tool to connect with the interviewer.

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All recruiters have asked this question almost every time they meet a new candidate. You shake hands, they ask you to sit down. You sit and smile. They ask this question. You begin,

"Hello. My name is ___. I currently work at ____ as ____. My education credentials include ........."

<BORING>

They somehow keep their smile and wait for you to finish while you speak whatever comes to mind at the time.

This is not the correct way to start a conversation.

Rather than a formal introduction, think of your two-minute response as a tool to build a connection with the interviewer, the company, and the future growth of all parties involved. This is an opportunity to show that you can fit perfectly into the culture. Show that it is interesting. Show your skills.

In all the interviews I have attended, the questions begin with what I mentioned in the part about me.

If you're cooler, make sure everything you've done differently from other candidates shows up at this point.

You can start on the lines of ...

Hi there. I am _____ and I am here as a candidate for position ____ on your team. I will finish my B.XX. on _____ for June 2018. As part of my course, I have worked on a project where we build _____ using ___ and ____. It was a great learning experience both technically and socially, as we had to balance the distribution of work within the team and continually seek guidance from professors and industry experts.

This is the point where you start to highlight your skills and accomplishments.

Other than this, I have represented my colleges in ______ and won the award. I also trained in ______. Apart from these, I usually spend my weekends working at ______ (or playing something, or some volunteer activities). Last week I was on a 50km bike ride which was a great test of strength and endurance.

Finish by pointing out where you are and where you want to go further.

That is all I can share. I am looking for an entry level position at _______ that can give a great start to my career. I will be happy to answer any questions you have.

Make sure this part of the interview is never impromptu. In the meantime, it shouldn't seem overly rehearsed either. You should already have a list of 100 things to share in your mind, of which 10-20 can be shared in the interview depending on the situation.

Whenever we face an interview, the most common question we hear is tell me about yourself or introduce yourself.

To better answer the question, you must first understand why they do it in the first place.

the interviewer is not looking for the trip of a lifetime. Rather, the question is to make you feel comfortable and it is a way for them to relax in the actual interview and get a general idea of ​​who you are.

It is important to remember that while the question is definitely about you, it is also about why you are a good fit for the position. With this in mind, your answer should detail

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Whenever we face an interview, the most common question we hear is tell me about yourself or introduce yourself.

To better answer the question, you must first understand why they do it in the first place.

the interviewer is not looking for the trip of a lifetime. Rather, the question is to make you feel comfortable and it is a way for them to relax in the actual interview and get a general idea of ​​who you are.

It is important to remember that while the question is definitely about you, it is also about why you are a good fit for the position. With this in mind, your response should detail experiences relevant to the position you are applying for and highlight you as the perfect candidate. So depending on how you answer, it will help the interviewer decide what to ask next. This is your chance to make a lasting first impression.

If you think this question is complicated, you are not alone. As you prepare for the answer, remember that the key part here is not only describing your personal life, but also your professional one. On that basis, I listed a few points here in two categories

Be sure to give professional and relevant answers to the position for which you are applying. This way you can respond. See the following example for newborns:

  • Hello, my name is Lily Taylor. I am from New Delhi / I am from New Delhi but currently I live in Mumbai.
  • I finished my studies from SND High School in 2015.
  • I graduated from NIT University in 2021 with a BE in Computer Science and Engineering / I completed BE in Computer Science and Engineering from NIT University in 2021.
  • Completed graduation with 87% / Maintained a GPA of 6.
  • As a computer science student, I am passionate about learning new programming languages ​​and am currently good at the Java programming language. During my graduation, I was part of a student-initiated group where we conducted workshops for other students on innovations in the computer industry.
  • In my spare time / free time I like to read books and play cricket.
  • As I come to my family, there are 4 members including me. My father is a teacher and my mother is a housewife. My little brother just showed up in the 12th grade.
  • Well, I don't have any real life work experience, but now I am looking forward to taking advantage of all that I learned and gaining practical experience.
  • Thank you for giving me the opportunity to introduce myself.

If you have experience, you should focus more on explaining past experience effectively because that is what the interviewer is looking for. If you want to check the example to get an experienced one and some other details on how to prepare an answer, you can watch my video where I provided some other details.

So these two examples are simple, short but the most effective at the same time. Hope this is helpful to you at least to leave a lasting first impression.

When I was preparing for the interviews, this was the most difficult and time-consuming question to prepare. This will be asked of you first in any job interview you request.

Framing a short, impressive answer takes time. I had read many examples on the internet and on Quora before deciding what to tell an interviewer about me.

Generally, a good response is something that should take about 2 to 5 minutes. You have to judge how much time the interviewer is willing to spend on this question. For ex. During my interview with Goldman Sachs, the interviewer asked me to explain in

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When I was preparing for the interviews, this was the most difficult and time-consuming question to prepare. This will be asked of you first in any job interview you request.

Framing a short, impressive answer takes time. I had read many examples on the internet and on Quora before deciding what to tell an interviewer about me.

Generally, a good response is something that should take about 2 to 5 minutes. You have to judge how much time the interviewer is willing to spend on this question. For ex. During my interview with Goldman Sachs, the interviewer asked me to explain in 2 minutes while, at McKinsey, the interviewers were not in such a rush.

So it all depends.

Points to remember when describing yourself:

  1. It is not necessary to repeat every point on your resume.
  2. Divide the answer into parts.
    1. If you are just out of college, start with the name of your college and the CPI (if it's worth mentioning). Then mention your values ​​as you used to say in this line: "I believe that I am a diligent person and setting personal goals and achieving them gives me an immense sense of satisfaction."
    2. Then I would talk about my internships / projects and the skills I acquired from them. Skills like working in a challenging environment, etc. along with technical skills.
    3. I would then add my PORs, extracurriculars, sports experience, hobbies, etc., which are not mentioned on my resume, and a summary attached to any experiences.
  3. Remember to always tell the truth. Interviewers are much smarter than you. A counter question that is not answered properly can leave a negative impact during interviews.
  4. It is up to you to mold your prepared response and present it in front of the interviewer. For ex. Tech profiles don't want to know about your extracurricular activities and would be more interested in learning about your programming skills and projects. Consulting profiles would like to know your multifaceted side. So know your role and then prepare yourself.
  5. Also, try to focus on saying things that are not on your resume and mention the skills you learned from that particular experience.
  6. Practice this in front of the mirror no more than 2 to 3 times before the interview. You don't have to clutter it up like you used to do on school days. It should come out naturally.

All the best!

PS: There is no set rule for describing yourself during interviews. You can talk about yourself in any way that makes you appear confident and prepared for the interview. I had done a lot of research myself while preparing the correct answer for myself. So take your time!

"Tell me about yourself": it is the most brown question to begin not only with an MBA interview, but also with any other interview at any stage of life. It doesn't matter how clichéd this question is, but it sets the direction for the entire interview.

To be honest, interviewers, in most cases, don't have time to check your profile and they also have an idea of ​​how to move on with the conversation with your answer to "Tell me about yourself."

Let's discuss how to prepare for this answer for an MBA interview, especially.

Introduce you

Your introduction should be som

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"Tell me about yourself": it is the most brown question to begin not only with an MBA interview, but also with any other interview at any stage of life. It doesn't matter how clichéd this question is, but it sets the direction for the entire interview.

To be honest, interviewers, in most cases, don't have time to check your profile and they also have an idea of ​​how to move on with the conversation with your answer to "Tell me about yourself."

Let's discuss how to prepare for this answer for an MBA interview, especially.

Introduce you

Your presentation should be something different and exclusive. Grab the attention of interviewers by advertising in a novel way. Always remember one thing; you should know the meaning of your name.

Talk about your academic credentials

Don't just talk about where you have studied, what were your graduating colleges, etc. Highlight earned grades (only if they can be mentioned, otherwise you should always skip). Your academic scores should definitely be promising if you've made it to the interview round from a top-tier high school.

Leadership experience is important

As you face an MBA interview, don't forget to talk about the events that reflect your leadership experience at any level. Whether it's your annual school function or any other life event where your leadership could help you succeed, you must mention it. The intake panel puts the most weight on this feature of yours.

Awards and accolades you bagged

Always mention any awards or recognitions you received for outstanding performance in academic or extracurricular activities. Strengthen your profile and testify to your nuggets of brilliance. Always make sure of the names of the awards you received and for what achievement.

Work experience (if you have any)

Most MBA applicants have adequate work experience of at least 2-3 years. Speak out about the nature of your job, your organization, your responsibilities, and your accomplishments. You will witness the cross questions of the interviewers while talking about your ex-job; so be prepared for the same.

Discuss your family history

Now comes the family, your parents and siblings. Start with the occupations of your father and mother. Give an idea of ​​what your siblings are doing. How many of your siblings are older and younger? You can also include the same. Well, this is a part of the answer that interviewers show less interest in.

Hobby activities you enjoy

"Persistence. Perfection. Patience. Power. Prioritize your passion. It keeps you sane."

Discussing your favorite leisure activities is also an imperative part of this answer. You can manipulate the facts a bit here. Mention only intellectual hobbies and be aware of the hobbies you are declaring. Let me explain you. Suppose if you say that your hobby is reading, then you should have all the information about the genre of books you read, your favorite writers, your publications, etc.

You can also talk about the social works you do or if you are associated with an NGO.

I think for your two minute answer I have put a lot of effort here and now I am going to close my answer. You will have to take some calls in real time synchronized with the environment.

The interview takes practice. When I advise candidates on how to interview, it is a process that usually takes me a few hours (at best). If they really want the job (and that's something that I, a recruiter, evaluate up front), they'll show the signs long before we get to the introduction stage.

One of the things that seemingly EVERYONE wanted to hear during my interviews with Facebook or Amazon or Bynder is my style and how I close out a candidate. My rule is to close the candidate at the end of the first call. To do that, I will take all the time in the universe (that is allowed) to chat.

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The interview takes practice. When I advise candidates on how to interview, it is a process that usually takes me a few hours (at best). If they really want the job (and that's something that I, a recruiter, evaluate up front), they'll show the signs long before we get to the introduction stage.

One of the things that seemingly EVERYONE wanted to hear during my interviews with Facebook or Amazon or Bynder is my style and how I close out a candidate. My rule is to close the candidate at the end of the first call. To do that, I will take all the time in the universe (that I am allowed) to chat with that person and help guide them in their career search, EVEN IF IT MEANS TO HELP THEM GET ANOTHER JOB WITH ANOTHER COMPANY. (And I really mean it).

I love what I do for a living because of this, because in my heart, I like to help people in the (albeit very limited) set of abilities that the Cosmos has gifted me with. (Still ... honestly, I would have loved a better body and maybe a little bigger wedding rig, but sure ... I guess baking cookies and recruiting is a perfectly adequate substitute for that!) get a voluntary commitment (I have to psychologically lead them to that answer without letting them know I'm doing it), then I won't send them to the client and will try very hard to help them find the right place for their personality type and skill set. I need to hear general buy signals right away.

Those signs of acceptance, of course, could be lies. Lies happen in interviews. In fact, lies in interviews are SO normal that as a recruiter I not only expect them, it almost annoys me if I do not find them in the places where they usually train. I don't envy people for lying; psychologically, we are programmed to lie and it is a very difficult psychological characteristic to overcome. What matters is that (a) their work history is 100% accurate and (b) that during the interview, I can find tricks to get them to open up to me and tell me the beans.

Therefore, you will almost always be asked the three hardest questions. I will give you MY answer. You should give yours.

"Tell us about you."

This should be your favorite question, but it's the one everyone hates the most. The reason it's hated is that it sounds like one of those tough psychological test questions ... and it isn't. The interviewer generally has no idea why this question is being asked. Most recruiters / interviewers ask it because they hear it so often that they think it's necessary. In a way it is, but neither is it. As a candidate, this is your chance to give your "elevator pitch." This is what I tell my candidates: this is a combination of a brief history of yours and your career. It's your elevator pitch where you stand next to the CEO of Google and have a short period of time to convince BOTH that what you do has value and that you are an interesting person.

What is mine

Oh Lord! Should I start with the moment I almost blew off my right hand as a 13-year-old playing with fireworks or just move on to fun? (Usually their eyes light up and I tell them the past story because, well, being an interviewer sucks and everyone's story is dumb and boring and they just want to not get bored with the candidate in front of them.) Well. What fun it is!

In my spare time, I'm a book reader, award-winning cookie baker, and I make my own crazy jam and preserves flavors. Dad wanted a quarterback, but he got a baker instead! At heart, I am an anthropologist, but I don't think I can call myself that because, unfortunately, I am only passing a postgraduate degree. Maybe one day! That said, I am fortunate that my passion in life translates quite well into a successful life as a Talent Acquisition SME. Talent acquisition (not just recruiting) is something I have about twenty years of experience with; helping companies as large as Verizon, Goodyear and Progressive not only find a certain type of candidate,

In the world of recruiting and recruiting, it's also a pretty tricky puzzle. There is a team that is missing a piece of their puzzle and that piece is causing them pain. They call me so that I can take the pain away from them and not only find them the right candidate, but while working with them, I teach them how to put the puzzle together faster, more efficiently while making the process pain free. I teach them how to hold that puzzle together, functioning at a higher level for longer periods of time. A recruiter finds an employee. A Talent Acquisition Professional teams up and teaches them how to keep growing even when the helpdesk professional has left.

I jokingly tell people this all the time: in the right role, I am priceless. However, in the wrong role, like all pieces of a puzzle, I am a giant waste of company resources. So if he's just a talent scout, I'm definitely not your man. I'm also not the type you stick with in long meetings. At Talent Acquisition, my job is to decode the company and teams, identify and refine the idea of ​​what an optimal candidate for each position looks like, and then teach recruiters how to identify those people. We remove most of that blueprint from team leadership (who have a LOT more pressing issues on their plate) and then help them through the selection process. By doing it this way (instead of the way above),

Closing one: Soooo… I'm basically in human trafficking!
Closure 2: Plus, I bake cookies and bring them in for informational meetings ... which probably explains why my clients schedule them even when no candidate is at stake. <feigning an epiphany> Hey. I guess I should have understood earlier.

You should have a sixty-second "elevator pitch" ready. Should be:

  • Some brief details about you outside of work that are moderately relevant, maybe a little humorous, and ABSOLUTELY MEMORABLE.
  • Those details should be reflected in what you do for a living;
  • The highlights of what you do for a living in such a way that if you explained them to your really older grandfather or grandmother, they would have no trouble understanding you;
  • There should be a memorable conclusion to your elevator pitch that you can reach the line bordering on suitability and not cross it. A joke is fine. Whatever it is, you must have a final joke for your elevator speech where after all the pitches have been given, they will remember:
    • “Who was that guy who said he was involved in human trafficking? I almost laughed. "
    • "Oh yeah. You know what? He really did a great job of explaining the difference between 'just a recruiter' and a 'technical support professional who can see the big picture and offer what we're looking for.'
    • "Oh God. That guy who talked about cookies. Let's bring him back. He had a good pitch ... but I want to try those cookies."
      (And yes ... I really do make cookies for meetings.)

IMPORTANT NOTE: In a world where 20 people like you with similar abilities interview ... who are the most remembered? Well, the ones with great skills maybe. But the one with great skills and an interesting joke / anecdote that everyone will remember (because believe me, they will forget my name, but they will NEVER forget, "Oh yeah, that guy who told us how he almost blew his hand ...") to call. Actually, it is a black magic psychological trick as a mnemonic device. They will remember if they liked / hated you, but in a sea of ​​candidates who liked them, you have created a bright light for yourself: "Oh, Sure. The guy who bakes cookies. " Or, “Oh, shoot. I loved that guy who mentioned he nearly blew his hand off when he was 13. "Proceed with caution,


"Why do you want to work here?"

This should be very easy for you. Hopefully, before your interview, you've done some research. Oh ... haven't you? Well then you suck. He had an interview with Okta scheduled for last Thursday; Zillow Group for last Friday. I was waiting for the final "counter offer" (we were at that stage) from Facebook and my rule was, "Keep interviewing until someone makes a great offer."

Okta was really at the top of my list and Zillow had just come out of nowhere. So to describe why I wanted to work there, I did my research. FIRST, this is not misleading. Upon learning about the company prior to the interview (which I did), I decided it was either a great place to work or a bad place. Based on that research, these two guys made the list (and many others didn't). So you should Google videos made by that company and find out if they are a fun place to work!

I interviewed Bynder and fell in love:

Working at Okta:

Working at Salesforce

So, here is a sample of mine:

The obvious answer is that I am looking for professional growth. But more specifically for Okta, it is twofold. So as a member of Talent Acquisition I started Googling "Bay Area best places to work" and started using YouTubing with company names, pleasantly surprised that Okta kept popping up! There are corporate videos that will always look good, but one of the fun things this led me to was a lot of testimonials about Okta. The other interesting thing is that Okta was the subject of one of my research papers at university a few years ago the total truth, and how to make systems more secure and find ways to make them work for people in all locations will be one of the biggest challenges we face in IT for decades to come. Okta is at the forefront of that process and, well, according to the wacky YouTube videos,

You should do research that includes:

  • Reading a dozen articles about that place,
  • View your "about us" videos online,
  • Watching their “what it's like to work here” videos (and talking about them will earn you points in an interview!),
  • Go to their Wikipedia page and read about them,
  • Go to their "About Us" page and read their story and learn as much of their corporate verbiage as possible and incorporate those values ​​and terms into your conversation with them.
  • Find TED talks and news interviews where your corporate directors have talked about the company.

Then in his "Why us?" answer, incorporate details about that research. It doesn't have to be a bloody final job. It should be one or two paragraphs long (5-10 sentences total). It should contain a bit about your corporate culture and why it is important to you; how you will fit into that culture and improve your business by having it there.


"Why are you changing jobs?"

This should be direct and to the point. You can give them a short answer, but I tend to keep it factual. The reason is that you have already explored options with previous answers, this should be some quick data on where you are working (or where you were working) and what precipitated you.

Oh, so I am married to a medical professional. She has been in the process of interviewing for a nursing leadership position at Stanford and Kaiser. It's all really unexpected, but these are the kinds of changes that keep life interesting. As I progressed through that process and it seemed like I was going to get a position, I realized that I had better consider my career options.

I believe I work for one of the largest professional and personnel services companies in the United States; with leadership and ethical values ​​that I rarely see anywhere. But sadly, it's a relationship that won't work out if I move to the West Coast. My goal has been to find a company that reflects similar values ​​that matter to me in terms of being ethical in general for the community in which it is located and that is building an interesting future when it comes to technology. And that brings us to ... pause ... your Facebook? Hey. I've never heard of you. What do you do again?

<slight smile when I get his attention>

You don't have to close like this. The dash of humor you display MUST reflect the personality of the person sitting across from you and the values ​​of the company. If you went to a Key Bank interview doing that, you probably wouldn't impress them too much. They tend to be suffocating (but there's nothing wrong with a very light and funny joke or two, as long as they don't derail the interview). Facebook? That interview was so fun, so casual, and so funny that I'm honestly giving you the highlights of a multi-hour interview where we spent an inordinate amount of time laughing and telling stories.

You MUST have the ability to increase or decrease your behaviors. You should reflect their body language during the interview. You MUST find that boundary between two a lot and enough and try to step into "too much" without passing. Why? Because if you DO NOT cross that border, that means that by default you will have done something a bit daring and VERY MEMORABLE. The key in interviews is to be remembered NOT just for your outstanding skills (breaking news, there are plenty of such people), but for your incredible personality and ability to lift the mood in the room. That last part can be extremely limited depending on the behaviors of those who interview you,


One last thing. When I interview and because of my needs as a human being, I don't reign in the Dan Holliday. I try to let my abundance of professional skills shine through. But because I'm at a level in my career where my story is big enough to support me AND I know my own personality in such a way that I can't (ABSOLUTELY CAN'T!) Work in a congested team, boring and crisp, instead let any potential employer see my humorous style right from the start. I want to get disqualified for it instead of hiding it and ending up on a team that will make me feel miserable and that I won't fit into. I want them to see Dan Holliday as a quirky team builder, resourceful and thriving in iterative environments where people act like humans all the time. So, for me, I refuse to change my communication style during interviews;


For other useful details, see:

  • What are Dan Holliday's experiences in hiring US and non-US candidates? Did you find any difference in their personalities or abilities?
  • What are the best tips for writing a resume?
  • Does the maximum length guideline for a resume still apply?
  • What are the best fonts to use on a resume?
  • What's the worst typo you've ever seen on a resume or other important document?

I interviewed Microsoft, Google, LinkedIn, Flipkart, Franklin Templeton and deleted them all. I have worked with all of these companies.

I gave more than 70 interviews in large and small companies, in India and the US, in a very exhausting job search process after my MS. After that, I took three breaks in my career and interviewed many more companies. Names include Walmart Labs, Target, InMobi, CA Technologies, Karvy, Open Text, Mindtree, BCG, Intellecap, Directi, Leo Burnett, IMRB, Nielsen.

I didn't usually clarify interviews when I started giving them, but with better skills and inte

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I interviewed Microsoft, Google, LinkedIn, Flipkart, Franklin Templeton and deleted them all. I have worked with all of these companies.

I gave more than 70 interviews in large and small companies, in India and the US, in a very exhausting job search process after my MS. After that, I took three breaks in my career and interviewed many more companies. Names include Walmart Labs, Target, InMobi, CA Technologies, Karvy, Open Text, Mindtree, BCG, Intellecap, Directi, Leo Burnett, IMRB, Nielsen.

I didn't use to clarify interviews when I started giving them, but with better interview skills and insight over the years, I have clarified each and every interview I've given in the last 3 years, in part because I've become very selective. with whom I interview. I received offers from Target, Open Text, InMobi, and a few others, but I accepted them from companies I've worked with.

Here are some of the best practices that I recommend using for presentations:

  1. Don't start with your name. The interviewer already knows.
  2. Don't say where you are from in the next sentence. The interviewer may not know the town / city where most of us come from. Focus on passing on your work history.
  3. I like to start with an informal word, like "then." The idea is to keep the conversation going and not make it look like you've recited a paragraph. This is not a living school. Other words could be 'safe', 'good'.
  4. Start with what you are currently doing.
  5. Then mention your last most recent experience.
  6. Use "I" or "we" as it was. If you lead the project you are talking about and guided your stakeholders, use 'me'. If the project was led by someone else, use "we". Be clear from which position of responsibility you were operating.
  7. Just highlight one important thing that you want to highlight or that is unique to each job.
  8. Then mention more past experiences, if any.
  9. You do not need to reveal your entire history if it is too long. Just talk about the jobs relevant to this job, but mention that you worked in another similar domain before for X years.
  10. Many of us have the urge to say everything in the introduction, don't do that. If you made a career change, you don't have to go into detail in the introduction. Save it for a later question.
  11. You can mention roughly how long you worked at a particular company. I refrain from that, instead I like to give more importance to what I worked on.
  12. Mention your impressive titles.

Here's my introduction during the LinkedIn interviews, which is my current job. So I was working with Flipkart.

That is why I currently work with Flipkart as a Senior User Researcher. Your payment page is my competition. I recently worked on their co-branded card with Axis Bank. Prior to this, I worked with Google as part of their Next Billion Users (NBU) team at GPay. It was a product made for India, for new Internet users, so I did a lot of research in Tier 2 cities. Before that, I worked with Microsoft on a combination of design and research functions. I was working on Visio, an enterprise diagramming product. I was previously a data analyst for a few years at Franklin Templeton and a few other companies. I have a couple of master's degrees from the University of Illinois and the National Institute of Fashion Technology.

If you are a student and don't have much experience to talk about, here is another presentation of me when I was changing careers. Back then I was mainly pitching myself into my career and personal projects. I remember this particular interview at CA Technologies for a UX position where I impressed the interviewer. He was very positive with me and said, 'I see you've been using your time very well.'

My last job was at Franklin Templeton Investments, where I worked as a data analyst. Before that, I did a master's degree at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. I studied advertising. Research courses were part of the program and I did some projects around design research. I worked at Franklin Templeton for two and a half years. However, I realized that that field was not for me and I did not enjoy working in an Analytics role. So over the past year, I have invested time in working on what interests me. I've done some self-projects in design, one on ABC and one on XYZ. the XYZ was made for a start-up. ABC was approximately ____ (one line) and XYZ was approximately ____ (one line).

Nota importante: Mis autoproyectos suelen ser muy detallados y los apoyo con un portafolio, haciéndolos muy reales, no solo algo de lo que estoy hablando.

Lessons are same here, except for these additional ones:

  1. If you are not doing anything currently then start with ‘My last job was…’
  2. Come directly to your education and what specific course you studied that prepared you for the job you are applying for.
  3. Then mention any tiny-teeny work experience. It could be in college, in a startup, in the past.
  4. State why you are interested in this position. Are you passionate about this field? Or you were in a different field that didn’t work for you? Do you find this interesting? The answer has to be unique to you as it has the potential to give you an edge over other applicants.
  5. Tell the interviewer how you developed your skill set- self-projects, reading, hackathon, created something? Show them samples.

With this crisp introduction, you've given enough material to the interviewer to ask for more. Now take a pause and let them do their job.


Addressing questions in comments/DMs: My self-projects can be found on my Medium profile where I write about my profession. If you look at the older articles, you would find 5–6 self-projects.

For those of you asking about how to bounce back from the career break, I leveraged Linkedin each time to find a job. Here are answers on this:

Anshul Agarwal's answer to Has LinkedIn helped you get a job? If so, do you have any tips?

Anshul Agarwal's answer to How do I find a job on LinkedIn?

Anshul Agarwal's answer to How do I find a job on LinkedIn?

1.Your name

Sir/Mam,I am Shraddha Pandey.

2.Your hometown

I belong to Gwalior, Madhya Pradesh

3.Your schooling

I did my schooling from “abc” school with aggregate of “x”% in tenth and “y”% in 12th.

4. Your graduation and higher degree (if applicable).

I have completed my "cde" college graduation with a total of "z"%.

5.- name and occupation of your father

My father's name is "___", he is a doctor.

6.Your reason for being there

I want to see myself as part of their company somewhere at a good level (just to impress them, it is necessary).

7.Your strengths and weaknesses (tell them about 5-6 strengths and some weaknesses)

  • Stre
Keep reading

1.Your name

Sir / Mom, I am Shraddha Pandey.

2.your hometown

I belong to Gwalior, Madhya Pradesh

3.Your schooling

I did my school education "abc" with a total of "x"% in the 10th and "y"% in the 12th.

4. Your graduation and higher degree (if applicable).

I have completed my "cde" college graduation with a total of "z"%.

5.- name and occupation of your father

My father's name is "___", he is a doctor.

6.Your reason for being there

I want to see myself as part of their company somewhere at a good level (just to impress them, it is necessary).

7.Your strengths and weaknesses (tell them about 5-6 strengths and some weaknesses)

  • Strengths
    • Obsessive worker
    • Adaptable (esto también le ayudaría a asegurar su trabajo)
    • Ambidiestro (si lo eres)
    • Entusiasmo
    • Integridad
    • Creatividad
    • Disciplina
    • Paciencia
    • Respetuosidad
    • Determinación
    • Dedicación
    • Honestidad
    • Versatilidad
    • Trabajador de equipo

(Don't you start to count your weakness like short tempered,clumsy and all).Use these lines as your weakness…

  • Weakness
    • Sometimes I become a bit emotional whenever I look at any poor person.
    • Sometimes,I start thinking about the consequences of the things that I have completed.

8.Your hobby(I am telling you mine)

  • Writing
  • Playing and learning guitar.
  • Reading
  • Travelling

Don't use any kind of exaggeration in your hobbies or any part of introduction.

9.Your projects (If he asks)

Tell them about your minor and major project(Remember this part of introduction can assure your selection).

10.Your curricular activities that you mentioned in your resume.

11.Awards and achievements

12.End your answer with an inspiring thought (It would be more better if you use your own inspiring thought)

Best wishes ❤

Shraddha ❤

This is one of those icebreaker questions that can be answered a million ways, but I think you should be prepared with a 20 second answer and move on.

The interviewer already has your resume, he already has an idea of ​​who you are, he's just breaking the ice and is actually giving you a chance to take the lead here, so don't waste it.

This is your chance to take control of the interview and turn it into a conversation, rather than where it is likely to be headed: an inquisition.

So comment on something about yourself and then incorporate it into the reason you are interested.

Keep reading

This is one of those icebreaker questions that can be answered a million ways, but I think you should be prepared with a 20 second answer and move on.

The interviewer already has your resume, he already has an idea of ​​who you are, he's just breaking the ice and is actually giving you a chance to take the lead here, so don't waste it.

This is your chance to take control of the interview and turn it into a conversation, rather than where it is likely to be headed: an inquisition.

Así que comenta algo sobre ti, y luego conviértelo en la razón por la que estás interesado en la empresa, ¡y luego hazle una pregunta al entrevistador!

“I’ve been in plumbing for twenty years and have seen just about every pipe-fitting you can name—so that’s why I was interested in Pipes-R-Us. Is this vacancy because you’re growing the company, or is it replacing someone?”

(Now, I probably wouldn’t lead with that question, but you can see how you can start directing things from here on out—or at least be an active part of the two-way conversation!)

Too often I let the interviewer lead the meeting. Too often I think I’m there at their disposal—when really we’re both present to discover if there’s a mutual match.

Come to the interview with more questions than you can possibly ask in 30 minutes—and prioritize them, so you start with questions that gather the most information, but also guide the interview toward your strengths.

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