How do I know if I am overqualified for certain jobs?

Updated on : December 7, 2021 by Anaya Jordan



How do I know if I am overqualified for certain jobs?

If you meet or exceed all required qualifications. Also, you will not receive calls.

Compare your qualifications and education with those posted for the job posting. If you meet or slightly exceed the requirements, you must submit an application.

I will share a personal story here. I once interviewed an IT recruiter for a sales position. The business was fairly new and progressive. They planned to rapidly expand in the area. The hiring manager showed me the refrigerator where they keep the beer for happy hour on Friday afternoon. Very Australian.

He had industry experience related to IT, implementation, training and sales of ERP and CRM. And a degree in Marketing Management with other sales experience. Everything seemed to be going well, until the interviewer pulled out the wonderful test.

I figured getting it right on this test would be

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I will share a personal story here. I once interviewed an IT recruiter for a sales position. The business was fairly new and progressive. They planned to rapidly expand in the area. The hiring manager showed me the refrigerator where they keep the beer for happy hour on Friday afternoon. Very Australian.

He had industry experience related to IT, implementation, training and sales of ERP and CRM. And a degree in Marketing Management with other sales experience. Everything seemed to be going well, until the interviewer pulled out the wonderful test.

I figured doing well on this test would be a positive note in my favor. And, because I was used to college entrance exams, midterms, final exams, and the GMAT and GREs, I thought I should quit. So, I finished the test in less than five minutes allowed and got 48/50 questions. I was proud of myself. He had never taken the test, but was familiar with the fact that the NFL combine used it to measure quarterbacks' intelligence.

Shortly after I got my results, the interviewer told me that I didn't fit in well for the position and thanked me for joining.

I was stunned. I thought the test was meant to find the best candidates.

However, on reflection I realized that sales is not a position that requires a lot of intelligence. In fact, intelligence can have a curvy relationship with sales success. That is, a salesperson must be smart, but not too smart.

The more analytical someone is, the less likely they are to persist in cold calling or stick to the script. Instead, a person overqualified for this position will begin to model target markets and communication methods in search of higher returns. This is a good trait to have in your data analysis or market research department. But you don't want your sales people to spend too much time thinking and researching. They should be calling, listening and selling.

Thus began my path away from sales and marketing to teaching.

On various job searches, I heard this answer and hated it. And then when I had to hire someone, I had to use this answer. This is what it means:

  • You are too advanced in your career for this position - if I'm hiring for an entry-level job, I don't want someone with a master's degree. That person will get bored with work, and bored employees tend to underperform over time.
  • If I give you this job, I guess if you find something more suited to your qualifications, you'll go away and take that job instead - I don't want to waste time training someone who's not at work for time.
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On various job searches, I heard this answer and hated it. And then when I had to hire someone, I had to use this answer. This is what it means:

  • You are too advanced in your career for this position - if I'm hiring for an entry-level job, I don't want someone with a master's degree. That person will get bored with work, and bored employees tend to underperform over time.
  • If I give him this job, I guess if he finds something more suitable for his qualifications, he will quit and take that job instead - I don't want to waste time training someone who is not on the job long term. . Nor do I want to stop someone in their career. If there is a better option, I hope you will find it.
  • People who are overqualified are not necessarily those with advanced degrees; They can be very fast and enterprising or super smart. But if I am hiring a receptionist, I do not want someone who is going to waste time thinking about news processes or ideas for my company. For that I hired managers. I want a receptionist to answer the phones and file the paperwork, or whatever routine work you assign to that person.


If you are told this in a job interview, the best thing to do is ask for feedback. Ask what specific qualifications the interviewer is referring to: a title? a previous project that shows you have too much potential talent? You can also ask, if you think I am not a good fit for this position, is there any other position in the company that I am more suitable for? Asking these questions shows that you are interested, and if possible, follow up with the interviewer later and thank them for their feedback.

Before jumping to conclusions, no, I don't add bitterness to interviews. Interviews are an opportunity, not a release event.

Overqualified is more silly, another excuse not to hire someone. It's time people were hired by what they know, not by whom, but that cannot be rationalized in an environment of people slapping on the back and spending their time accumulating "friends" who can take them somewhere. part, instead of taking night classes and getting more and more. knowledge. Networking means something to those who network.

God I love those excuses that the overqualified are dissatisfied and

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Before jumping to conclusions, no, I don't add bitterness to interviews. Interviews are an opportunity, not a release event.

Overqualified is more silly, another excuse not to hire someone. It's time people were hired by what they know, not by whom, but that cannot be rationalized in an environment of people slapping on the back and spending their time accumulating "friends" who can take them somewhere. part, instead of taking night classes and getting more and more. knowledge. Networking means something to those who network.

God, I love those excuses that the overqualified are dissatisfied and leave, as if young recent college graduates don't do the same because they want to "move up." Most of the "overqualified" have been working hard at jobs below them, yes, but they would love to move a little further up the food chain, instead of all the menial jobs they've been stuck with since 2008, now 11 years of jobs in which they are severely overqualified. After a decade of night shift, weekend work, maybe that weekday job would be a blessing, even if they are undervalued and underpaid. Why do you think they are applying, because they are happy with what they are doing? Every job gets easier the more you do it. Does that mean that no one stays at work for long? Explain how you came to that conclusion.

I guess bringing a lot of education and experience means little. For all of you experts who have rationalized skipping the overqualified, answer me this: you are overqualified, which is impossible, by the way. If you were to go to court to file a malpractice lawsuit, if your legal counsel was also a doctor, wouldn't you choose them because they are "overqualified"? Of course, no. If your mechanic was also an engineer, would you tell him he's "overqualified" to work on your car? Not really. Overqualified is more silly, another excuse not to hire someone. It's time people were hired by what they know, not by whom, but that cannot be rationalized in an environment of people slapping on the back and spending their time accumulating "friends." that they can take them somewhere, instead of taking night classes and getting more and more. knowledge.

You can read more of my thoughts on Quora at: https://www.quora.com/profile/Jeffrey-Jackson-44

Jeffrey neil jackson

BA, BA, BS, M.Ed., SHRM-CP

You are the architect of your life. Your life vision and grand purpose must be decided and committed by no one but yourself if you want to maximize the meaning of your life. In the right job, you will find that you are learning, growing, and getting closer to the best version of yourself.

Here are three signs that you have found the role that is truly best for you.

1) KEEP YOU alert

Great leaders love challenges. Innovators have an insatiable drive to build and create. Ultimately, you know you've found the right position when you're driven to solve problems, take strategic risks.

Keep reading

You are the architect of your life. Your life vision and grand purpose must be decided and committed by no one but yourself if you want to maximize the meaning of your life. In the right job, you will find that you are learning, growing, and getting closer to the best version of yourself.

Here are three signs that you have found the role that is truly best for you.

1) KEEP YOU alert

Great leaders love challenges. Innovators have an insatiable drive to build and create. Ultimately, you know you've found the right position when you're driven to solve problems, take strategic risks, and drive your organization to higher performance. When you commit to your job out of obligation and out of fear of risk or challenge, you leave at the end of the day feeling drained or anxious. When you've found a role that challenges you to level up your own leadership skills, you'll begin to anticipate the activity that drives production. You will feel pride, satisfaction, and a sense of vigor. You will go home thinking about the mission, not because you are worried, but because the work has harnessed your skills and involved you in the essence of who you want to become.

2) YOU CAN TRUST YOUR TEAM

You need to feel like your team is communicating and cooperating in all the right ways to make the company vision a reality. Strong trust in your team is built on a performance-based culture of excellence. Some companies try to build a foundation of false harmony to achieve operational excellence. They fill their office space with ping pong tables, snack rooms, and kegerators to appear competitive with Google-style job benefits and attract the best recruits. But nobody works for Google because of the free food. When your team is driven by excellence in its craft, by excellence in the rigorous disciplines required for the disintermediation of an entire industry, then, and only then, you can have top-down and bottom-up harmony in professional life. It's more,

3) YOU ARE WORKING FOR SOMETHING BIGGER THAN YOURSELF

Everyone wants the happiness of their professional role. This includes a sense of security and adequate compensation. A great salary, even if it is from a great name, could provide partial fulfillment. The most fulfilling roles are those in which you really feel connected to a mission that is bigger than yourself and you are being drawn to grow and expand your capabilities. A great company always has the vision of serving humanity at its core. Look for companies whose vision matches yours and you will have a lasting source of energy and passion for the job.

I'll be anonymous on this, please. Some possibilities: -

  • Employers generally want subjects to do their jobs, not brained heroes.
  • You're too old after working in the trenches for years as a dog.
  • Your boss is less qualified than you. You are a threat.
  • They don't like you for x, y, and z reasons. Humans are not exactly rational.
  • You can't stand it because you have a brain. So why do they ask you if you have a high 'EQ' another way to measure if you can hold out or if you are a 'team player'. Einstein didn't discover relativity because of his high EQ or being a team player, but they don't want Eins
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I'll be anonymous on this, please. Some possibilities: -

  • Employers generally want subjects to do their jobs, not brained heroes.
  • You're too old after working in the trenches for years as a dog.
  • Your boss is less qualified than you. You are a threat.
  • They don't like you for x, y, and z reasons. Humans are not exactly rational.
  • You can't stand it because you have a brain. So why do they ask you if you have a high 'EQ' another way to measure if you can hold on or if you are a 'team player'. Einstein didn't discover relativity because of his high EQ or being a team player, but they don't want Einstein.
  • You don't speak their languages ​​for example, Chinese banks only hire you if you can speak Putonghua fluently or maybe if you're Chinese.
  • Lily-Ann studied at Tsinghua Architecture, then MIT Physics, Harvard Business School MBA and finished with a PhD at Oxford, speaks 41 languages, is friendly, plays the cello, looks like a goddess, runs a weekly marathon and works 90 hours straight without complaining. She has wings. Yes, you are overqualified, but she is better than you, so they want her. It is Darwinian.

What do you do for a living? Double your efforts, improve and reorganize. Educate yourself. Only in times of trial and tribulation can we be a hero to ourselves. Fuck if they don't want you. It is their loss.

Job hunting is a learned skill, like playing tennis. A novice tennis player would fail if he faced an expert player and would not dream of participating in a tournament. You are a newbie to job hunting. What you have been doing to date has not worked. You need to learn to play and improve your chances of success.

You should consider hiring a job coach who can teach you how to search for work, write resumes, and interviews.

If you can't hire a job coach, at least read a few expert books. I recommend What color is your parachute? and job hunting for dummies. There are other worthy boos

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Job hunting is a learned skill, like playing tennis. A novice tennis player would fail if he faced an expert player and would not dream of participating in a tournament. You are a newbie to job hunting. What you have been doing to date has not worked. You need to learn to play and improve your chances of success.

You should consider hiring a job coach who can teach you how to search for work, write resumes, and interviews.

If you can't hire a job coach, at least read a few expert books. I recommend What color is your parachute? and job hunting for dummies. There are also other valuable books.

Here's something radical: If your master's degree is putting employers off, you can leave it off your resume.

Get a paid job, any job, even if you work at McDonalds. Employers prefer to hire people who are already employed. Turn that work experience into a better job and work your way up to a level that you think is appropriate for your education.

Get a volunteer job. Volunteer jobs teach you transferable job skills, help you network, get you used to the demands of a workday, and provide you with referrals. Volunteer jobs can be turned into permanent paid jobs. Public libraries, hospitals, nursing homes, schools, political parties, Habitat for Humanity, soup kitchens, etc. all need volunteers.

Good luck.

I've heard of people doing this because they want to improve their interviewing skills. Practice makes every activity better, and being interviewed and doing well is a skill. People are not automatically good at it.

As long as one of the parties does not waste time, the interview is not a waste of time.

Many seem to be on the employer's side, they shouldn't waste the employer's time… blah, blah, blah. But I know it happens that a boss wants to hire a particular person, but he also knows that HR is going to require that he interview multiple candidates. So this boss interviews people knowing that

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I've heard of people doing this because they want to improve their interviewing skills. Practice makes every activity better, and being interviewed and doing well is a skill. People are not automatically good at it.

As long as one of the parties does not waste time, the interview is not a waste of time.

Many seem to be on the employer's side, they shouldn't waste the employer's time… blah, blah, blah. But I know it happens that a boss wants to hire a particular person, but he also knows that HR is going to require that he interview multiple candidates. So this boss interviews people knowing he has no intention of hiring them before he meets them.

What is good for the goose is good for the goose. That is, if it is okay for an employer to interview someone with no intention of hiring them. Then it must be okay for a potential employee to interview a company from which they have no intention of accepting a position.

Well, honestly, this situation will always prevail. There will always be someone more qualified than you!

But that's not your problem or at least it shouldn't be.

That others are more qualified does not guarantee that they will get that particular job. In fact, for every job there is a set required qualification criteria, and if someone is more qualified, recruiters never actually hire them. That said, you should also do your bit: prepare well for the interview:

  1. Find out more about the company you have applied to.
  2. Learn so much in detail about the job you are applying for.
  3. Prepare your answer
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Well, honestly, this situation will always prevail. There will always be someone more qualified than you!

But that's not your problem or at least it shouldn't be.

That others are more qualified does not guarantee that they will get that particular job. In fact, for every job there is a set required qualification criteria, and if someone is more qualified, recruiters never actually hire them. That said, you should also do your bit: prepare well for the interview:

  1. Find out more about the company you have applied to.
  2. Learn so much in detail about the job you are applying for.
  3. Prepare your answers on why and how you fit in for the position. (Needless to say, this will help you mentally believe that you are destined for that role, and once you do, it can convince the interviewer)
  4. Go and attend that interview with a warm smile.


So, summing it up here, you need to be the center of attention. Have faith and confidence in yourself at all times (including during the interview). Keep learning and improving your skills. Always do justice to your work and it will be worth it.

And yes, one last thing, don't let an interview rejection stop you.

It is the only way you will learn as it is very rare for companies to hire someone with the experience, unless you are lucky enough to be hired immediately after college for whatever reason. I'm in the IT field, I spent money out of pocket to learn something that I knew I wasn't going to get from my current employer lots of false promises, so I took the initiative. At the time, it was the right thing to do, as I found myself out of work a few months later. With what I learned, I was able to get a job for something that was not qualified simply because I was able to pass the technical exam.

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It is the only way you will learn as it is very rare for companies to hire someone with the experience, unless you are lucky enough to be hired immediately after college for whatever reason. I'm in the IT field, I spent money out of pocket to learn something that I knew I wasn't going to get from my current employer lots of false promises, so I took the initiative. At the time, it was the right thing to do, as I found myself out of work a few months later. With what I learned, I was able to get a job for something that was not qualified simply because I was able to pass the technical interview and I also said that I had done it in my previous job not really. When i got the job,

If you are not competent enough, don't be embarrassed, it will usually come out during an interview. I interviewed a guy who claimed to have had the experience based on what he did on his resume. He couldn't even answer simple questions that I knew wouldn't even haunt him with questions anymore, he just passed it on to my manager.

Good luck with what you decide.

You cannot “know” if you are considered to be overqualified unless the employer tells you that they consider you to be overqualified for a particular position.

With that said, you can assume that if you are applying for an entry-level (bachelor's) internship, and you're a graduate student with four years of s / w experience, you might seem overqualified for some positions.

There are plenty of resume tips on Quora and elsewhere. My simple advice is to tailor your resume to the position. You should avoid intentionally lying or misleading the recipient, but to improve your chances of getting an interview

Keep reading

You cannot “know” if you are considered to be overqualified unless the employer tells you that they consider you to be overqualified for a particular position.

With that said, you can assume that if you are applying for an entry-level (bachelor's) internship, and you're a graduate student with four years of s / w experience, you might seem overqualified for some positions.

There are plenty of resume tips on Quora and elsewhere. My simple advice is to tailor your resume to the position. You should avoid intentionally lying or misleading the recipient, but to improve your chances of getting an interview, apply for the internships that best suit your skills / experience. Then tailor your resume to fit more closely with the job posting. Avoid adding too much additional experience or irrelevant information. If the employer is looking for an intern, keep your resume geared to the level of experience you are looking for. If you have more experience than your resume indicates, that should make you an even more effective intern. But your resume should get you to the door for an interview first, so tone it down if necessary.

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