How do I know if a work-from-home offer is legitimate and not a scam?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Caleb Reynolds



How do I know if a work-from-home offer is legitimate and not a scam?

Unless you have had a face-to-face interview at the company workplace, you will need a contract. In today's 'gig economy', never work on the basis of a handshake or a verbal promise. Talk is cheap. The contract should describe your job responsibilities, timelines for providing the service, compensation, and any other emollients (for example, bonuses for early job completion).

Even before signing the contract:

  1. check with the Better Business Bureau (BBB in the city where the company appears to be based), whitepages.com, yellowpages.com. Look for complaints from others wit
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Unless you have had a face-to-face interview at the company workplace, you will need a contract. In today's 'gig economy', never work on the basis of a handshake or a verbal promise. Talk is cheap. The contract should describe your job responsibilities, timelines for providing the service, compensation, and any other emollients (for example, bonuses for early job completion).

Even before signing the contract:

  1. check with the Better Business Bureau (BBB in the city where the company appears to be based), whitepages.com, yellowpages.com. Look for complaints from others with the BBB. IF not listed on BBB, whitepages.com, YP.com | The Royal Yellow Pages you should be suspicious.
  2. Look for a business license (which is a license to run a business) in the community where the business is based.
  3. Check with LinkedIn and Facebook and Twitter. Most legitimate businesses have a presence on all of these sites! Who are the directors of the company, that is, the owners? Look for those particular people on LinkedIn (it's the owner who would sign a contract). Check the references that others have posted about them; check your "connections". Are they in similar businesses (they probably should be…)? If you can't find the particular person on LinkedIn, which is used to recruit new hires by the HR people who work for the company, you should be suspicious.
  4. Is there a Legal Aid Society in your community? If so, ask them to review the contract.
  5. Ask the company for local references (the companies they have provided services to). Find out if those companies are satisfied with the services provided.
  6. Ask the company for the names and contact information of other local employees. Talk to them about how often they pay for services provided.

Those are just a few suggestions. I also like the suggestion already provided to your question.

Be careful; Do not let yourself explode!

Unfortunately, most work from home is not legitimate. They are multi-level marketing scams. Once you have sold your products to all the friends and family you have and cashed in for every pity sale you can get, the money runs out. That is unless you can force your friends and family to sell too, and put them in the same position you were in and get a few dollars from your sales.

Even for the legitimate ones, you need skills like coding or baking. Selling things on Ebay and Amazon is a legitimate home business. For the most part, if they do get close to you, the chances that they are kind of

Keep reading

Unfortunately, most work from home is not legitimate. They are multi-level marketing scams. Once you have sold your products to all the friends and family you have and cashed in for every pity sale you can get, the money runs out. That is unless you can force your friends and family to sell too, and put them in the same position you were in and get a few dollars from your sales.

Even for the legitimate ones, you need skills like coding or baking. Selling things on Ebay and Amazon is a legitimate home business. For the most part, if they do approach you, the chances of them being some kind of scammer are high.

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