How do I join Google?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Grayson Raymond



How do I join Google?

Google only supports talent, not only qualifies

if you are a computer science student and you want to work with google

As a programmer you must have good programming skills and you can join this and show your skills on Google Code Jam. Make a round of three if you eliminate all 3 rounds, then Google will organize the semi-final and final round in California. This is not easy to clarify, but you have passion, hone your skills and you can do it is difficult, but not impossible.

Another way to get a job in any field

How Google hires

There is no single type of Googler, so we are always looking for people who can br

Keep reading

Google only supports talent, not only qualifies

if you are a computer science student and you want to work with google

As a programmer you must have good programming skills and you can join this and show your skills on Google Code Jam. Make a round of three if you eliminate all 3 rounds, then Google will organize the semi-final and final round in California. This is not easy to clarify, but you have passion, hone your skills and you can do it is difficult, but not impossible.

Another way to get a job in any field

How Google hires

There is no single type of Googler, so we are always looking for people who can bring new perspectives and life experiences to our teams. If you are looking for a place that values ​​your curiosity, passion and desire to learn, if you are looking for colleagues who are great thinkers eager to take on new challenges as a team, then you are a future Googler.

you can also follow this link

  • Apply - Google Careers

Start with number one APPLY

Find your partner

Match your skills and interests to the jobs you are excited about and the problems you want to solve.

Focus on your resume

This is the first information we will see about you, so highlight your achievements. Here's how to frame them:

  • Align your skills and experience with the job description.
  • Be specific about the projects you have worked on or managed. Which it was the result? How did you measure success?
  • If you've had a leadership role, tell us about it. How big was the team? What was the scope of your work?
  • If you are a recent college graduate or have limited work experience, include school-related projects or courses that demonstrate relevant skills and knowledge.
  • Be brief: If there is additional information (such as a portfolio) that we need during the hiring process, your recruiter will work with you to collect it.

How does it work

Phone / Hangouts Interviews

During phone or Google Hangout interviews, you will speak with a potential colleague or manager.

For software engineering positions, your phone conversation / Hangout will last between 30 and 60 minutes. By answering coding questions, you will talk about your thought process while writing code in a Google doc that you will share with your interviewer. We recommend using a hands-free headset or speakerphone so that you can type freely.

For all other roles, your phone conversation / Hangout will last between 30 and 45 minutes. Be prepared for behavioral, hypothetical, or case-based questions that cover your role-related knowledge.

On-site interviews

Typically, you'll meet with four Google employees (some potential teammates and some cross-functional) for about 30 to 45 minutes each.

For software engineering candidates, we want to understand your coding skills and technical areas of specialization, including programming tools or languages, and general knowledge on topics such as data structures and algorithms. There is usually an exchange of ideas in these discussions, just like at work, because we like to push the thinking of others and learn about different approaches. So be prepared to discuss your solutions in depth. Overcome your own limits and find the best answer; This is probably how you work anyway.

For candidates outside of engineering, you will have the opportunity to highlight strengths in four different areas:

  • General cognitive ability: we ask open questions to learn how you approach and solve problems. And there is no one correct answer: what matters most is your ability to explain your thought process and how you use data to inform decisions.
  • Leadership: Be prepared to discuss how you have used your communication and decision-making skills to mobilize others. This could be taking on a leadership role at work or with an organization, or helping a team succeed even when you weren't officially the leader.
  • Role-Related Insights - We're interested in how your individual strengths combine with your expertise to create impact. We're not just looking at how you can contribute today, but how you can grow in different roles, including those that have yet to be invented.
  • Googleyness - Share how you work individually and as a team, how you help others, how you navigate ambiguity, and how you strive to grow outside of your comfort zone.

During the interview process, feel free to ask your interviewers for clarification to ensure that you fully understand their questions. And feel free to interview us too. Ask questions (about the job, about the team, about the culture) that will help you decide if the job will be right for you.

How to prepare

Interviews for all roles

Here's some advice straight from Laszlo Bock, our senior vice president of people operations.

  • Predicting the future - You can anticipate 90% of the interview questions you will receive. "Why do you want this job?" "What is a difficult problem that you have solved?" If you can't think of any, Google "the most common interview questions." Write down the top 20 questions you think you will get.
  • Plan: For each question on your list, write your answer. That will help them stay in your brain, which is important because you want your responses to be automatic.
  • Have a backup plan - Actually, for each question, write down THREE answers. Why three? You need to have a different and equally good answer for each question because the first interviewer might not like your story. You want the next interviewer to hear a different story and become your advocate.
  • Be Data Driven - Each question needs to be answered with a story that shows you can do what you are asked. "How do you lead?" should be answered with “I am a collaborative / decisive leader / whatever. Let me tell you about the time when I ... "
  • Practice: Everyone improves with practice. Practice your interview responses, out loud, until you can tell each story clearly and concisely.

Almost ready? Here are some last things you might want to know, based on what people often ask recruiters.

  • What to wear: For most of our interviews, the dress code is informal, but your recruiter will inform you of what is most appropriate. When in doubt, be yourself and wear what makes you feel comfortable.
  • How to structure your interview responses: When answering questions, it is important to show how you arrive at a solution, so think out loud.
  • Helpful questions to think about as you prepare: How do you work best, as an individual and as part of a team? What challenges have you faced at school or work and how did you solve them? Which of your skills or experiences would be advantages in the position and why?
  • Ask your interviewers for clarification if you don't understand a question, and feel free to take your time with the answers.

Apply for a job at Google

The first step to landing your dream job at Google is finding the perfect position to apply for. You'll find Google job openings on your Glassdoor profile, complete with job descriptions and salary estimates, where available. When you find the right job, you can also apply through Glassdoor by clicking the "Apply Now" button on the job listing page.

Google encourages applicants to "match your skills and interests with the jobs you are excited about and the problems you want to solve," according to its website. That being said, if you feel your skills ma

Keep reading

Apply for a job at Google

The first step to landing your dream job at Google is finding the perfect position to apply for. You'll find Google job openings on your Glassdoor profile, complete with job descriptions and salary estimates, where available. When you find the right job, you can also apply through Glassdoor by clicking the "Apply Now" button on the job listing page.

Google encourages applicants to "match your skills and interests with the jobs you are excited about and the problems you want to solve," according to its website. With that said, if you think your skills make you perfect for multiple jobs, you can apply for more than one job at a time. "You can apply for more than one position at a time, although we recommend that you narrow down your options to a few jobs that really match your skills, experience and interests," according to the site. "We will review your resume, and transcripts of interns and new graduates, to determine which is the best option."

Tips for Resumes and Cover Letters for Google

Convincing Google to hire you starts with a stellar resume and cover letter. Because Google favors candidates who are energetic, innovative, and willing to learn, your resume and cover letter should convey how you've shown initiative, ideas you've turned to reality, and your continuing education. But don't honk too much on your own horn: Google also values ​​intellectual humility, or the ability to recognize when you're wrong and adjust your ideas accordingly.

What is the best way to convey all this information? Showcase what you've accomplished on your resume and cover letter, quantifying the results and sharing details that go beyond simple job descriptions. Here's what it looks like: Imagine that one of your tasks in your current job is writing software documentation. But instead of including that as a must on your resume, think about the results of your efforts. Your documentation makes it easy for customers to use the software your company builds, and that's what you should write about in these documents.

And because Google values ​​data in the hiring process, use evidence to back up any claims you make. For example, don't just say you've improved the customer experience. Instead, use the available numbers to display it. That might look like this: "After the release of the new documentation, customer complaints dropped by more than 25 percent in just one month."

Talk to a Google recruiter

Many Glassdoor users report that their initial contact on Google was with a recruiter, and if that conversation went well, they moved on to interviews with Google staff. Otherwise, you may have the opportunity to speak with a recruiter at your college or university. "We host outreach events at hundreds of universities around the world to publicize our internships and opportunities for recent graduates," Google writes on its website. “Check with your college's career center to see if a Google representative will visit your campus. And while we can't visit every school, you can find and apply for all of our vacancies on our Students site. "

Another way to impress a Google recruiter is by asking the right questions. Ask questions that show you want to better understand the position, what the company culture is like, and how he or she will define success in the position. Some questions may include:

What are the daily responsibilities of the position like?

What are the values ​​of the company? What characteristics do you look for in employees to represent those values?

What is your favorite part of working at the company?

What does success look like in this position and how is it measured?

Are there opportunities for professional development? If so, what do they look like?

Who will I work closely with?

What do you think is the most challenging aspect of this job?

Is there anything in my experience or on my resume that makes you question whether I am a good fit for this position?

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