How do I install genymotion on Ubuntu?

Updated on : December 4, 2021 by Jay Walker



How do I install genymotion on Ubuntu?

Download the latest genymotion installer for ubuntu from:

https://dl.genymotion.com/releases/genymotion-2.8.0/genymotion-2.8.0-linux_x64.bin

Now go to your folder where you downloaded genymotion in a terminal.

Normally it would be

  1. cd $ HOME / Downloads  

Now write

  1. chmod + x genymotion-2.8.0-linux_x64.bin 
  2. ./genymotion-2.8.0-linux_x64.bin  

And the installation will start now.

you have a lot of trouble on genymotion dude try memu rooted emulaor ... you can select the fastest emulator android version so far ... watch this video for a complete guide

Docker allows developers to package their dependent applications and packages in a lightweight, portable container, and then publish to any popular Linux machine, so it can be virtualized.

Docker is an open source application container engine, based on the Go language and following the Apache 2.0 License.
Docker allows developers to package their dependent applications and packages in a lightweight, portable container, and then publish to any popular Linux machine, so it can be virtualized.
The containers use the litter box mechanism and do not have an interface with each other, which is similar to an iP

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Docker allows developers to package their dependent applications and packages in a lightweight, portable container, and then publish to any popular Linux machine, so it can be virtualized.

Docker is an open source application container engine, based on the Go language and following the Apache 2.0 License.
Docker allows developers to package their dependent applications and packages in a lightweight, portable container, and then publish to any popular Linux machine, so it can be virtualized.
The containers use the mechanism of the litter box and do not have an interface between them, which is similar to an iPhone application. The performance cost of the container is very low.

1. System

The following versions of Ubuntu are supported.

  • Eoan 19.10
  • Bionic 18.04 (LTS)
  • Xenial 16.04 (LTS)

2. Uninstallation

Before installation, run the following command to uninstall the previous version.

  1. sudo apt-get remove docker docker-engine docker.io containerd runc 

3. Install Docker

Docker can be installed in a number of ways. Here it is to install via repository.

Update the apt package.

  1. sudo apt-get update 

The installation package allows apt to use the repository over HTTPS.

  1. sudo apt-get install \ 
  2. apt-transport-https \ 
  3. certificates of ca \ 
  4. curly \ 
  5. agent-gnupg \ 
  6. common software properties 

Add the official Docker GPG key.

  1. $ curl -fsSL https://download.docker.com/linux/ubuntu/gpg | sudo apt-key add - 

Verify the key with fingerprint.

  1. sudo apt-key fingerprint 0EBFCD88 
  2. pub rsa4096 2017-02-22 SCEA 
  3. 9DC8 5822 9FC7 DD38 854A E2D8 8D81 803C 0EBF CD88 
  4. uid unknown Docker version (CE deb) 
  5. sub rsa4096 2017-02-22 S 

Configure the Docker repository.

  1. sudo add-apt-repository \ 
  2. "deb arch = amd64 https://download.docker.com/linux/ubuntu \ 
  3. $ (lsb_release -cs) \ 
  4. stable" 

Install Docker.

  1. sudo apt-get install docker-ce docker-ce-cli containerd.io 

Verify that the installation is complete.

  1. root @ ubuntu: ~ # sudo docker run hello-world 
  2. Hello from Docker! 
  3. This message shows that your installation appears to be working correctly. 

4. Create an NGINX container with Docker

To run

  1. Docker run -it nginx 

to unload a container.

To run

  1. docker ps 

to check the container in operation.

  1. root @ ubuntu: ~ # docker ps 
  2. CONTAINER ID PICTURE COMMAND STATUS CREATED PORT NAMES 
  3. 165a6fb2ad38 nginx "nginx -g 'daemon of…" 2 hours ago Up to 2 hours 80 / tcp intelligent_herschel 

To run

  1. Docker inspect 165a6fb2ad38 

to check the details of the Ngnix container.

Find the IP in

  1. IP adress 

and run

  1. curl 172.17.0.2 

to check if Nginx is running.

To run

  1. docker exec -it 165a6fb2ad38 bash 

to access the container.

  1. Genymotion requires VirtualBox to be installed on your Linux system for it to run. To learn / install VirtualBox on your machine, you can read the post about it here. Procedure to install VirtualBox on Linux.
  2. Now, to deploy Android machines in Genymotion, we need a genymotion cloud account, which can be obtained for free by registering at this Genymotion Cloud registration URL.
  3. Now we have to download Genymotion first, after registering, please login to the Genymotion site and download the Genymotion machine renderer from here, depending on the Linux distribution and build you are using
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  1. Genymotion requires VirtualBox to be installed on your Linux system for it to run. To learn / install VirtualBox on your machine, you can read the post about it here. Procedure to install VirtualBox on Linux.
  2. Now, to deploy Android machines in Genymotion, we need a genymotion cloud account, which can be obtained for free by registering at this Genymotion Cloud registration URL.
  3. Now, first we have to download Genymotion. After registering, log into the Genymotion site and download the Genymotion machine renderer from here, depending on the Linux distribution and build you are using 32 or 64 bit.
  4. Now go to Terminal on your Linux by menu or by typing "Ctrl + Alt + T".
  5. Now in the Terminal, navigate to the Directory where the downloaded Genymotion image is present Let's consider that the downloaded image is present in the Downloads folder. Now type these commands in terminal.
  6. cd ~ / Downloads /
  7. Now, Genymotion will be installed as shown in the following figure
  8. Now, run Genymotion from VirtualBox or from the Menu. Alternatively, you can run it from the terminal by running
  9. Now Genymotion appears, log in with the Genymotion account we registered earlier and click Create new virtual device or "Add" button.
  10. You will see several Android images listed below, select the one you want to emulate and click Next
  11. The Android image will now be downloaded to the machine and saved for future use, after downloading. Just select the Android image that is present on your system and click the "Play" button.
  12. The Android image you want will be implemented, now you can play games, install Whatsapp, etc. and do anything with your own Linux device right on your PC

Bluestacks, as of now, is not available for Ubuntu. I guess what you need is an Android emulator to run Android apps on Ubuntu.
There are a few other alternatives you can consider:

  • Genymotion - is an open source Android virtual machine project. It is fast, highly customizable, and very easy to use. After installation, you can choose the version of the operating system to download and you can customize its appearance in Ubuntu. So far the best Android emulator I have found after Bluestacks. In addition, it is also available for Windows. However, one must have VirtualBox installed on the computer in order to run
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Bluestacks, as of now, is not available for Ubuntu. I guess what you need is an Android emulator to run Android apps on Ubuntu.
There are a few other alternatives you can consider:

  • Genymotion - is an open source Android virtual machine project. It is fast, highly customizable, and very easy to use. After installation, you can choose the version of the operating system to download and you can customize its appearance in Ubuntu. So far the best Android emulator I have found after Bluestacks. In addition, it is also available for Windows. However, one must have VirtualBox installed on the computer to run the emulator (download it from the given link or from the Software Center). You can follow the instructions given by Sushant Pankaj in his answer.
    Read more here: Genymotion Link to VirtualBox: Downloads - Oracle VM VirtualBox
  • Android Virtual Device (AVD): AVD comes bundled with the Android SDK. Usually it is used by application developers to test their applications and therefore it can also be used as an emulator. However, it is sometimes slow and buggy.
    How to Run Android Emulator on Ubuntu or Debian - Linux FAQ
    Download Android Studio and SDK Tools
  • Bluestacks on Wine: Wine is used to run Windows applications on Ubuntu. I'm not sure if Bluestacks can work on that. Some of the Windows applications may not run in Wine or may not work well. So it is completely your choice if you want to use Wine. However, I would not recommend using it.
    Wine can be downloaded from the Software Center or from the link provided:
    https://www.winehq.org/

I think practically all that is happening here is overthinking.

How do you install Ubuntu? The Ubuntu installer makes this as easy as it comes.

So, find the layout and flavor of your choice. If it has to be Ubuntu, I would suggest Ubuntu Mate.

Download the live image for your architecture. They are most likely 64-bit these days. When in doubt, research your CPU (and if necessary, your motherboard). Go with the LTS (long term support) version, which is currently 18.04.

Download and use some suitable application, like the universal USB installer, for example, to put the image on a USB stick. I AM

Keep reading

I think practically all that is happening here is overthinking.

How do you install Ubuntu? The Ubuntu installer makes this as easy as it comes.

So, find the layout and flavor of your choice. If it has to be Ubuntu, I would suggest Ubuntu Mate.

Download the live image for your architecture. They are most likely 64-bit these days. When in doubt, research your CPU (and if necessary, your motherboard). Go with the LTS (long term support) version, which is currently 18.04.

Download and use some suitable application, like the universal USB installer, for example, to put the image on a USB stick. IMPORTANT: Data that has been on the USB memory before will be lost. So, make sure you don't have any important data.

In case you are using secure boot, disable it first (BIOS setup).

Then start from your USB stick. The one-time start menu does the job. In case you don't know how to access the boot menu in one go, you will have to look it up for your particular motherboard. Because there is no standard and different vendors use different keys for different devices. Some examples are ESC (ASUS netbook), F8 (ASUS PC, AMD), F9 (HP PC), F12 (Dell laptop, Intel) and some more.

Now your motherboard is likely to make the right choice in terms of UEFI vs Legacy BIOS or it will give you the corresponding options in the boot menu.

Use the live system (first option, "try Ubuntu"), NOT the installer. Not only will you have the option to test it first and the installer will be there too. Unlike the pure installer, it will provide you with an out-of-the-box operating system. Which makes things much easier. For example, in case you need it, because you have problems or questions, you can simply open a browser and do your search.

So, open the installer and just follow the steps. As mentioned above, the Ubuntu installer makes this as easy as possible.

If you have any questions, such as how to install alongside Windows, just open a browser and hit Google, Youtube, or whatever you want. Usually Firefox is ready to use.

If the machines can boot from a USB stick and the USB stick allows partitioning, then yes.

I have done this with Fedora; with Ubuntu, it should be similar. Put the USB stick in the machine, as well as your boot / install media (in my case: another USB stick). The installer should detect and allow you to clean the disk and format it. In my case, I was working with an older BIOS-based system, so I created only a / boot and / (root) partition and overridden it to not create or use a swap partition (because that can wear out cheap USB SD devices very fast). In a modern UEFI BIOS, your installer

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If the machines can boot from a USB stick and the USB stick allows partitioning, then yes.

I have done this with Fedora; with Ubuntu, it should be similar. Put the USB stick in the machine, as well as your boot / install media (in my case: another USB stick). The installer should detect and allow you to clean the disk and format it. In my case, I was working with an older BIOS-based system, so I created only a / boot and / (root) partition and overridden it to not create or use a swap partition (because that can wear out cheap USB SD devices very fast). In a modern UEFI BIOS, hopefully your installer is "smart" enough to do the right thing.

Afterwards, I had to fiddle with some firmware (BIOS) settings to bypass the "no hard drives" error message and automatically boot from the USB stick directly.

Some firmwares do not allow USB booting (or will always show a menu asking for confirmation first), and some USB drives are not allowed to partition (they always have a single FAT partition, which is useless in this case). You can test the former just by starting a LiveUSB or something like that; and in the latter case, just open Gnome Disks, try to make some partitions on the disk, delete them, reconnect them and see if they are still there.

There are 2 methods through which you can install C ++

Command line method.

Do this in your terminal:

sudo apt-get update

to update your package list with the latest version of g ++ enter your password and press Return and then,

Do:

sudo apt-get install g ++

to install g ++.

Method 2: user interface method

You can also install it from the Software Center. Type "Software Center" on the dash and then type g ++ in the search bar after the software center opens with hints and then click install and enter your password.

Yes.

The reason you see so many guides telling you to install Windows first is because they want to avoid guiding you through the GRUB reinstallation process later. In legacy BIOS systems, the way bootloaders have to work is to install their first stage in the first 440-446 bytes of the MBR, then use that stage to load subsequent code so that it works properly as a bootloader. .

When you install Ubuntu, it will install the GRUB bootloader there as usual. Then if you install Windows later, it will install NTLDR stage 1 and overwrite GRUB.

This doesn't mean that nothing is broken, it just means

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Yes.

The reason you see so many guides telling you to install Windows first is because they want to avoid guiding you through the GRUB reinstallation process later. In legacy BIOS systems, the way bootloaders have to work is to install their first stage in the first 440-446 bytes of the MBR, then use that stage to load subsequent code so that it works properly as a bootloader. .

When you install Ubuntu, it will install the GRUB bootloader there as usual. Then if you install Windows later, it will install NTLDR stage 1 and overwrite GRUB.

This doesn't mean that nothing is broken, it just means that until you fix it, you won't be able to start Ubuntu.

By installing Windows AND THEN Ubuntu, you are saving yourself some time.

You can follow this procedure if you install Windows after Ubuntu: Grub2 / Installing - Community Help Wiki

With UEFI systems, this isn't a big deal, because bootloaders work in a fundamentally different way, and ultimately more flexible and less crappy. Instead, a boot loader just makes one entry in the EFI variables, and then another EFI variable is used to set the boot priority, setting the default boot loader first. Windows will simply set your bootloader as the highest priority. You can literally change it back in the UEFI settings on your motherboard, or you can use something like efibootmgr or the UEFI shell to reset it. However, you will not have to reinstall ANYTHING.

You need to have Ubuntu on a CD or a flash drive, therefore they provide an ISO file, which is a CD image. You can burn the ISO file to a CD or a USB stick.
To use a pendrive, use a tool like UNetBootin or Yumi.

Once you have ubuntu on a USB device or CD, change the boot options to boot from that device (usually done in the boot options menu which can be accessed by pressing f1-f12 when your computer boots).

Other Guides:


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