How do I get my first job if I have no work experience and am in high school?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Max Allen



How do I get my first job if I have no work experience and am in high school?

There are two main things to keep in mind as a high school worker, and a few things I wish I had known when I started:

  • Are you ready to work

AND

  • Do you want money or do you want a job?

Being ready to work is more than being physically ready. My first job was working in cornfields the summer of my ninth grade. He worked every day (yes, that means not on weekends), rain or shine, walking through the cornfields for 4 to 10 hours a day. I wasn't really physically ready for work, but most of it was being mentally unprepared. He wasn't used to the idea of ​​having to be there every day.

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There are two main things to keep in mind as a high school worker, and a few things I wish I had known when I started:

  • Are you ready to work

AND

  • Do you want money or do you want a job?

Being ready to work is more than being physically ready. My first job was working in cornfields the summer of my ninth grade. He worked every day (yes, that means not on weekends), rain or shine, walking through the cornfields for 4 to 10 hours a day. I wasn't really physically ready for work, but most of it was being mentally unprepared. He wasn't used to the idea of ​​having to be there every day. I didn't like that he walked to my stop at 6:20 in the morning to make sure I was on time. And that was during the summer. Now I work in fast food, and I know there are some nights that I might not finish until around one in the morning, but I still have to get up and go to school in the morning. Are you mentally ready to juggle school work, household chores, shifts, and family responsibilities? If you are already struggling or do not feel very comfortable,

It also means that you can know when you shouldn't try too hard. I've taken a few days of mental health just to recover and catch up on class work. But that can't be every day, so you have to learn to balance. I work variable hours, so I can do up to 21 hours on a weekend, or just three throughout the week. On average, I work between 12 and 14 hours. I have a friend who normally works 19-20 hours a week. Five to eight hours may not sound like a lot, but even working takes something away from you. Not to mention, we all know we had an assignment that we started at midnight the night before, but you may not get that option because you have to work.

The difference between wanting money and wanting a job is huge. Sure, the paycheck is the reason you keep coming back, but the job offers something too. The advice I have given above comes from experience. I can handle a lot more now than I could before starting work. I know that if I wanted to quit my job, I have the skills to find another source of income. I earn points on applications and interviews for being a student with a part-time job who also pursues the most rigorous studies available to him. Love it. I love being (partially) financially independent. I can go out to dinner with my friends without begging my parents for a few bills.

But if you are only there for the money and you don't care where it comes from, then a job is not for you. You are an unskilled worker in the eyes of the job market, which is synonymous with cheap. You will try to apply to jobs for which you have no business because they pay you well. They probably won't hire you and you will almost certainly be fired. Asking your parents for an allowance would be a route that will save a lot of people the headache.

Other than that, be sure to expose yourself as much as possible, drop off your resume in person, and keep trying until you step foot in the door.

Obviously, you could look for work or do a job yourself, as some have suggested.

Or you can volunteer. What are your interests? Volunteer at an animal shelter, local hospital, food pantry, church outreach network, senior center, or any non-profit organization in your area. Do it responsibly. Put in a significant number of hours a week for a significant number of months. Arrive on time. Do whatever they need to: sweep, stack, file, answer the phone politely, be assertive, find ways to help them achieve their goals (check with your supervisor before doing anything important), discuss it with your family.

Keep reading

Obviously, you could look for work or do a job yourself, as some have suggested.

Or you can volunteer. What are your interests? Volunteer at an animal shelter, local hospital, food pantry, church outreach network, senior center, or any non-profit organization in your area. Do it responsibly. Put in a significant number of hours a week for a significant number of months. Arrive on time. Do whatever they need to: sweep, stack, file, answer the phone politely, be assertive, find ways to help them achieve their goals (check with your supervisor before doing anything important), talk about it with your family and friends and in your community .

If you have coding and math skills, take a challenge on Kaggle (Your Home for Data Science) or HackerRank or other competition. Employers will respect any accomplishments you have there. If you don't have any of those skills, use the free resources on the internet to get some. Or get some writing and speaking skills.

The main point is to show initiative, commitment, responsibility and skills. Employers will respect that.

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