How do I get an IT job in Japan?

Updated on : December 4, 2021 by Dylan Shaw



How do I get an IT job in Japan?

To not only get a job in Japan, but also to be able to perform, Japanese language ability is an important factor. If you have good IT skills and good Japanese language skills, getting a job in Japan is not difficult.

There are many recruitment agencies in Tokyo that mainly focus on bilingual candidates. I will give some examples below.

However, if you have some niche skills like AI / Machine Learning / RPA, even without the Japanese capabilities, you would have a chance.

But don't be put off by what I mentioned above, if it doesn't fall into the two categories mentioned above.

Keep reading

To not only get a job in Japan, but also to be able to perform, Japanese language ability is an important factor. If you have good IT skills and good Japanese language skills, getting a job in Japan is not difficult.

There are many recruitment agencies in Tokyo that mainly focus on bilingual candidates. I will give some examples below.

However, if you have some niche skills like AI / Machine Learning / RPA, even without the Japanese capabilities, you would have a chance.

But don't be put off by what I mentioned above, if it doesn't fall into the two categories mentioned above. In recent years there have been some changes in the Japanese market. A few years ago the language could be a real handicap, but now there are some Japanese companies that don't care about the Japanese language at all. Better to have, yes, not without that is fine for them too. This has been a nice change.

Some of these companies are the following:

1. Rakuten: you can say that they are the Amazon of Japan

2. Mercari - Japan's largest community-driven marketplace with over JPY 10 billion in transactions made on the platform every month.

3. Fast Retailing - A $ 20 Billion Company. In addition to its main subsidiary Uniqlo, it owns several other brands, including J Brand, Comptoir des Cotonniers, GU, Princesse Tam-Tam, and Theory.

4. Line: They are the WhatsApp of Japan

Rakuten employs a large number of people.

So to summarize, you can reach out to recruiting companies that primarily deal with bilingual candidates (but are not limited to bilinguals). His clientele are mainly employers who also need English. Examples can be:

ReachExt KK

Michael Page Japan

Robert Walter

etc.

Or you can directly refer to the careers pages of the direct employers I mentioned above. The suggestion in this case is that you should keep checking your work pages regularly as different types of requirements keep popping up.

And then don't give up. I wish you the best.

Japan has traditionally been very conservative in allowing foreigners to enter, live and work there.

Japan's Interior Ministry says that more than 70 percent of Japanese inns and hotels that did not welcome foreign guests last year also do not want to have them in the future.

Source: Japan's lack of affection for foreigners?

Japan has one of the lowest fertility rates in the world. Add to that a very long life expectancy and an alarmingly high suicide rate, especially among young men, the country is in dire need of skilled young workers who can lead the country into a future driven and dominated by s

Keep reading

Japan has traditionally been very conservative in allowing foreigners to enter, live and work there.

Japan's Interior Ministry says that more than 70 percent of Japanese inns and hotels that did not welcome foreign guests last year also do not want to have them in the future.

Source: Japan's lack of affection for foreigners?

Japan has one of the lowest fertility rates in the world. Add to that a very long life expectancy and an alarmingly high suicide rate, particularly among young men, the country is in dire need of skilled young workers who can lead the country into a science-driven and dominated future. and technology.

Source: The Economist - The old and the old

The Japan Immigration Office has a popular work visa called a highly qualified professional visa.

Eligibility for this work visa is based on a point system, and there are 3 main categories in which you can accumulate your points

  • Advanced academic research
  • Advanced technical and specialized skills
  • Advanced business management activities

Source: Japan Visa Guide

This work visa is aimed at IT / Technology professionals. There are 2 other visas, including the work visa and the general visa.

This Japan visa guide should come in handy.

Your best bet as an IT professional is to find an employer who will sponsor your work visa in Japan, on a job board like VisaOk, and then move there and immerse yourself in the culture and life there.

The Japanese are generally very courteous and friendly.

Hawaii is also a very short plane ride from Japan, so you can really enjoy life in Japan!

How amazing that you are looking for work in Japan!

According to the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare of Japan, the work of non-Japanese in the field of information technology in Japan has increased by 56%!
Most of their citizenship is Chinese or Korean.

However, the fact that the Japanese are looking outside their country to recruit new people is already something.
There is currently a huge shortage of IT workers here. It is quite normal to hire a freelancer abroad to cut costs.

On top of that, Japan has had its record of visa applications in 2016 (a 15.7% increase over the previous year and the highest since 2007).

Keep reading

How amazing that you are looking for work in Japan!

According to the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare of Japan, the work of non-Japanese in the field of information technology in Japan has increased by 56%!
Most of their citizenship is Chinese or Korean.

However, the fact that the Japanese are looking outside their country to recruit new people is already something.
There is currently a huge shortage of IT workers here. It is quite normal to hire a freelancer abroad to cut costs.

On top of that, Japan has had its record of visa applications in 2016 (a 15.7% increase over the previous year and the highest since 2007).

To answer your questions, you can do the following:
1. Register with all HR companies located in Japan, recruiters can help you.
2. Apply directly to IT companies located in Japan.
3. Start with an internship in Japan.

Make sure you have some sort of portfolio ready like Github.

Let me know if you need help! You can always message me for more information.

All the best!

1) Go to meetings. The best two for you are:
Tokyo iOS Meetup
Hacker News - Tokyo (Disclosure - I run this)

2) Show people the cool apps you've made.

3) Mention that you are looking for a job in the market.

4) Wait.

Thanks for the A2A.

Noa's answer is good so I'll just add something to that.

If you are looking for a job in a Japanese company, it would be very helpful to have an N1 certificate in the Japanese language proficiency test. That would look good on your resume (and is required for foreigners in certain companies).

Another good place to look for IT jobs is daijob.com.

Good luck!

column. Graduated from Tarlac State University Entrepreneurial degree in bus

willing to work the night shift, hardworking, good listener, respect for the elderly, good moral character, quick learner, easy to work, can drive four wheels and motorcycle. He can speak english. I want to stay in Japan. 46 years married and have 3 children.

Yes it is, especially for experienced professionals.

I worked in two companies that did not require Japanese skills at all, at least in many departments. One in the automotive industry, Mitsubishi Fuso Truck and Bus Corporation (Daimler AG), and another in the technology industry, Rakuten Inc. (which I am currently working on). Also, I know many foreigners who worked here without knowledge of Japanese.

I put the name of both companies because, if you want to apply to companies that do not require Japanese, these are some of them. (Remark: If someone gets a job because of my answer, please beg

Keep reading

Yes it is, especially for experienced professionals.

I worked in two companies that did not require Japanese skills at all, at least in many departments. One in the automotive industry, Mitsubishi Fuso Truck and Bus Corporation (Daimler AG), and another in the technology industry, Rakuten Inc. (which I am currently working on). Also, I know many foreigners who worked here without knowledge of Japanese.

I put the name of both companies because, if you want to apply to companies that do not require Japanese, these are some of them. (Remark: if anyone gets a job because of my answer, please let me know in some way, maybe on LinkedIn, I'd love to know. I'll also put up some job search lessons below that I hope can help someone.)

The point is, if you're not good at Japanese, you should have years of experience and a good profile to make up for it in some way. Of course, again, there are exceptions. I dare say I was one of them. I had no years of experience (despite internships) and I still got a job in one of the largest companies in Japan, with no knowledge of Japanese.

I say this because, for people like me, there is hope. You should have a job search strategy. So, here are some tips:

1) If you are inexperienced, build it however you can.
- If you are still in your home country and you are not in a rush to come here, I would recommend that you try to work in a company there before, and at least have something to show companies when you are here.
- If you are here as a student, try to do as many practices as you can. Even though many companies don't consider internships a real experience, it's better than nothing, right? And it can open doors for you. Also, get involved in activities that allow you to meet people and discover your passions: student organizations, competitions and anything that can make you learn something, especially with people, and also express who you are in your CV. Remember: people hire people, not CVs, so it is possible to show who you are by the activities you do. Examples of activities you can do as a student in Japan: hackathons, tech events / meetings, Hult Prize Foundation (if you are interested in social entrepreneurship), AIESEC (I was never actually part of any activity in Japan,
- If you are here working in factories, restaurants, etc., don't be afraid to keep looking for opportunities. I worked in a factory before and I saw a lot of people with great profiles who stopped looking for opportunities, not believing that they can. The longer you don't realize that you can, the more difficult it becomes.

2) Target companies and positions that might fit your profile.
This is important. Many people, including me at some point, applied for so many companies and positions that I saw. But, as you can imagine, there are limitations for non-Japanese speakers.
Below you can find some companies that do not require Japanese, at least for some positions.
- Recruitment sector: many foreigners who did not have as much experience work as recruiters. Unfortunately, I was looking for COVID-19 jobs on occasion, so as you can imagine, they get more selective at those times, and most of them weren't hiring or were only hiring with industry experience, which didn't require of them. training. Hopefully, by the time you're reading it, the situation has improved, so here are some company names to apply for: Robert Walters, Robert Half, Michael Page, Randstad, Wahl + Case,…
- Consulting companies: Yes, they hire people without Japanese, but yes, it is really difficult. If you are inexperienced, the chances are really low. But still, you can get close to those companies, I got an interview for one of them, so you might have a chance. Companies to check: BCG, Accenture, Frost & Sullivan,…
- Technology companies: again, a lot of people who don't know Japanese, but a really competitive industry. Companies to check: Rakuten, Google, Microsoft, Apple,…
- Financial industry. Companies to verify: BNP Paribas
- Automotive Industry. Companies to verify: Mitsubishi Fuso Truck and Bus Corporation (Daimler AG), Nissan, BMW, ...
Actually, there are likely to be jobs in any industry, whether the business is global, or is targeting international people in some way. My recommendation is to search LinkedIn for your destination position and put "Japan" as the location, and verify the profile of foreigners. Check if they don't have a high level of Japanese and list all their companies. You don't even need to contact them, even though some of them can give you valuable information by reviewing your CV.

3) Recruiters can help you get a job.
My recommendation is to keep your LinkedIn page up to date and add as many recruiters as you can (look for people who work at Michal Page, Robert Walters, Randstad, Wahl + Case,…). You don't even need to message them. If they think your profile is interesting and they have a job, or might have one in the future, they will contact you and probably schedule a call with you. One thing about Japan is that recruiters in Tokyo lack good professionals, so they don't need to contact you if they think your profile is good enough. Calls with them can be really revealing. I got a lot of my job search knowledge from recruiters' calls. Little insights into the market and the companies I can fit into that completely changed my job search journey. They can also put your profile in the company's database and contact you later. By the way, this is how I got my job. I was contacted by a recruiter at first, he didn't have a chance at the time, but he put my CV in his company database. A few months later, another recruiter contacted me and got me an interview.

4) Of course, if possible, learn Japanese.

Ideally, of course, you should learn Japanese, get more opportunities, and get the best of the country.

But the truth is that learning Japanese takes a lot of time and dedication, especially for Westerners. To have a good level of Japanese (JLPT N2 - upper intermediate), at least two years of intense study would be required. Really intense, almost full time I would say. It has some exceptions, of course, of people who immerse themselves in Japanese settings, love the culture, and / or want to be here for their entire lives. But yes, it requires a lot of time and motivation. Motivation that people who intend to be here for a few years and time that can sometimes be devoted to other priorities, such as technical studies, for example, which can be useful in any country, do not have.

When I came to Japan, I came as a transfer student from Brazil. I studied at a university whose language of instruction was English and all my colleagues were international students. I would have two years of study at the university and of course I hope to be fluent in Japanese by the end of these 2 years. That's when I spoke to a professional counselor and he told me that at the end of 2 years, I should aim for an N3 level of Japanese. N3 is intermediate level and doesn't really make much of a difference when looking for a job. For job search, most of the time they are: you speak fluent or it doesn't matter. I also spoke with many people who spent years in Japan, working people who did not learn the language properly. So that's why I changed my strategy to make the most of these 2 years and get hired.

In short, some of the jobs you can get if you don't have Japanese:
1) English teacher (especially if you are a native English speaker)
2) Recruiter
3) Programmers, designers and other technical professionals
4) I work in a large international company , if you have experience and a good profile
5) Jobs in factories, restaurants, convenience stores, ...
There are other possibilities, I met entrepreneurs, researchers, psychologists, teachers of other subjects, cooks, but these above are the most common for those who They don't speak Japanese, from the people I met over the years.

Thanks for A2A!

It largely depends on the ** skill set ** you have and the ** job market ** for that skill. Of course, it is easier to get a job if your skill matches the demand and if you are good at the Japanese language.

In my opinion, the difficulty of the job search mainly affects the following factors:

1. Japanese language skills. If you live in Japan, you will have to deal with Japanese in many situations. Having less or no Japanese skills will make you a "kind of" handicap in communication. If you are an employer, it makes sense to hire people who can understand your i

Keep reading

Thanks for A2A!

It largely depends on the ** skill set ** you have and the ** job market ** for that skill. Of course, it is easier to get a job if your skill matches the demand and if you are good at the Japanese language.

In my opinion, the difficulty of the job search mainly affects the following factors:

1. Japanese language skills. If you live in Japan, you will have to deal with Japanese in many situations. Having less or no Japanese skills will make you a "kind of" handicap in communication. If you are an employer, it makes sense to hire people who can understand your instructions quickly and accurately. There are also jobs that don't require a lot of communication in Japanese, but are generally jobs in a specific niche.

2. Visa. In Japan, a work visa does not automatically mean that you can work in any industry or position. For example, I have an engineer visa (as of now) and it limits me to working as a teacher, public worker, or any non-tech related job. While some companies are willing to help with the visa, most are not. In most cases, the first question an interviewer will ask you is what type of visa you have and he / she can decline immediately before anything else for this reason.

3. Work experience. If you only have a few years of work experience in your industry, that is also a disadvantage unless the company has no other option to hire. In my earlier conversation with a Japanese colleague, people consider themselves professionals in their field if they have been working in it for at least 5 years. If you have 10 years of experience or more, you may be considered even if you don't have enough knowledge of Japanese.

I can only write about IT because it is my industry. As far as I know, Japan has a shortage of IT talent, especially bilingual ones. Apart from Tokyo, Osaka and the Kansai region are also suffering from this IT talent shortage and are even experiencing a regional brain drain as the younger population tends to move to Tokyo while working.

I have heard a recent trend that the salary of tech workers is starting to rise due to this shortage. As foreigners, we can take advantage of the trend in our favor if we know it and are willing to take advantage of that opportunity.

(I'm not good at English, so feel free to suggest editing my grammar if you find anything inappropriate. Thanks!)

Yes, of course!

Generally N3 and some skill for employment - (for example - Some programming skills, management skills or web development skills, or some specific technology related skills are required) are the basic requirement. So you have both. You should be able to get a descent job.

Now it is necessary to understand that N3, is considered equivalent to the level, in which the candidate can speak in the business context. So are you capable of doing that? Will you be able to pass two general interviews, one that tests your general speaking skills and the second that tests your technical ability in Japanese?

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Yes, of course!

Generally N3 and some skill for employment - (for example - Some programming skills, management skills or web development skills, or some specific technology related skills are required) are the basic requirement. So you have both. You should be able to get a descent job.

Now it is necessary to understand that N3, is considered equivalent to the level, in which the candidate can speak in the business context. So are you capable of doing that? Will you be able to pass two general interviews, one that tests your general speaking skills and the second that tests your technical ability in Japanese? If the answer is Yes, you should be able to overcome the short list and the hurdle of the interview.

Second, you are talking about digital marketing. This will require you to be able to read the kanji at a higher level, as well as post your views in Japanese. Understand the nuances of language in the local / colloquial context, etc. This is a critical and very important job for any company. This requires a native level of Japanese. So are you comfortable with that? If the answer is No (which is likely), I will recommend that you continue to learn more Japanese. Preferably start communicating with native speakers in read / write. Read native Japanese language newspapers - web articles, etc. And also understand the local spoken language. If it's already N3, it shouldn't take long.

Third, I looked at his profile. Says BA Economics. Although this is not Red Flag. It conveys that you may not have any technical knowledge. So where and how have you learned digital marketing? Especially SEO, etc.? Do you understand analytics focused on digital marketing? Do you understand the management of portals / web pages, etc.? How much professional or practical work experience do you have? This will play a crucial role in your interview and starter pack. So if you don't have a solid technical background. Learning or getting certified in digital marketing / associated analytics / or some related field like marketing or social media or analytics can help you accelerate your career.
In any case, if you don't have relevant work / professional experience and good certifications, you can start from scratch and move on.

Lastly, Pune is abuzz with Japanese businesses and Japan-related opportunities. Look in the right places.

I hope this helps.

I see a bright and good future for you. All the best.

You can check the job boards at GaijinPot.

But in my opinion, you are doing this the wrong way. Change your thinking to that of a busy manager on a very limited budget. First HR and then manager / staff will look for ways to eliminate you, not help you get a job.

Even with western flag companies, there will always be a bias towards Japanese speaking people (especially if you can read it ... which is incredibly rare for gaijin).

I wouldn't pressure you to look for English teaching jobs in Japan given your undergraduate degree, but consider the obvious that it will be much easier for you to see.

Keep reading

You can check the job boards at GaijinPot.

But in my opinion, you are doing this the wrong way. Change your thinking to that of a busy manager on a very limited budget. First HR and then manager / staff will look for ways to eliminate you, not help you get a job.

Even with western flag companies, there will always be a bias towards Japanese speaking people (especially if you can read it ... which is incredibly rare for gaijin).

I wouldn't pressure you to look for English teaching jobs in Japan given your undergraduate degree, but consider the obvious that it will be much easier for you to look for work in your field of choice in Japan, if you have already managed to move to Japan. with some other kind of work. This reduces the concern of company managers for you as an unknown and foreign quantity. Nobody wants to have to tell their own boss, "Oh, I was wrong to hire that guy and spend a ton of money to bring him to Japan, only to find that it just isn't going to work for X / Y / Z reasons" .

Particularly in Japan, where management is based on consensus, it will almost always be easier for them to say (roughly, but very, very politely): "You have great skills, but we have decided to take another direction in hiring." That way, they don't lose the reputation of their peers and managers, and they don't have to answer painful questions about wasted money and effort. It is your safest and "conservative" path to choose.

Decide what your reasons are for wanting to work in Japan and find a way to get to Japan before looking for work there. While you're there, don't hang out with expats, look for ways to immerse yourself in Nihongo and master it along with cultural understanding of why things work the way they do in Japan. Then they will be more likely to see you as one of those few foreigners who adds real value to the companies you are interested in joining.

Thanks for the A2A!

This question is relative or case by case. Difficulty finding work in Japan varies greatly based on the following factors:

  • Knowledge of the Japanese language. Definitely, someone who knows the language very well and is almost close to the native level can find a job more easily than someone who does not know a greeting in Japanese.
  • Skills and years of experience. The person who has very specialized skills and has years of experience can get a job pretty quickly. The Japanese treasure the years of experience that an individual has in their industry. I've seen foreigners pay a lot
Keep reading

Thanks for the A2A!

This question is relative or case by case. Difficulty finding work in Japan varies greatly based on the following factors:

  • Knowledge of the Japanese language. Definitely, someone who knows the language very well and is almost close to the native level can find a job more easily than someone who does not know a greeting in Japanese.
  • Skills and years of experience. The person who has very specialized skills and has years of experience can get a job pretty quickly. The Japanese treasure the years of experience that an individual has in their industry. I have seen foreigners getting high paying jobs in Japan with almost no command of the Japanese language. The twist is that they have 15 years of experience in IT and building core IT infrastructure.
  • Demand in labor. If a certain industry is falling, of course, the demand for labor is lower, so the opportunity is lower (the salary will also be lower). Conversely, if an industry is booming, demand is really high (and wages will increase as supply is limited). An example is the cloud and data center industry. As more companies adapt to the cloud, more data centers are needed to build and operate. More opportunities have opened up, but specialists in this field are limited, so people in this area tend to get jobs pretty quickly (and may even have an above-average salary).
  • Work history. If one has moved to several companies in a year or two, recruiters may be suspicious and think that there is a problem with that person.
  • Finally, the person himself. If the person cannot handle rejection well after an interview, or the person does not know proper manners in Japan or does not know how to act and speak during the interview, then getting a job is definitely difficult.

(Feel free to correct my grammar and words, English is not my mother tongue).

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