How do I get a software engineering job at Apple?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Jaqueline Cooley



How do I get a software engineering job at Apple?

The closest to safe shooting ways:

  • Go to a university that has an internship program that Apple participates in, get an internship from Apple, and do a good job there. (And if you can't get into Apple's internship program for one reason or another, get up close to one of Apple's peers or as close as you can get - do it in the park once you get there.) Better job. Request a letter of recommendation. Do not lose it, it is gold when looking for work.
  • Make friends with people at Apple, ask them to recommend that hiring managers review your resume. Oh make sure I say good things
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The closest to safe shooting ways:

  • Go to a university that has an internship program that Apple participates in, get an internship from Apple, and do a good job there. (And if you can't get into Apple's internship program for one reason or another, get up close to one of Apple's peers or as close as you can get - do it in the park once you get there.) Better job. Request a letter of recommendation. Do not lose it, it is gold when looking for work.
  • Make friends with people at Apple, ask them to recommend that hiring managers review your resume. Oh make sure it says good things (like a decade of experience).

The internship is probably more reliable, both require being very good at work.

It is also possible, but more difficult to achieve:

  • Work for a company that Apple probably wants to buy.

Also make sure you have a good answer for the most common Apple interview question "Why Apple?" Also frequently asked like "Why do you want to work at Apple?"

Good luck.

There is never a definite way to get a guaranteed job at the company you want the most. To begin with, I would recommend differentiating yourself from the rest, to do so I would say that networking is your friend, as well as putting some work in a portfolio or even on your own website, you can also apply and see where that takes you if you have an excellent resume with the requirements they are requesting. In general, meet people from the industry, develop your skills and find a way to show it, and I wish you good luck in that.

Guaranteed? Buy the company and hire yourself.

Realistically? Go to college, get an appropriate degree, be able to demonstrate why and how you will provide value to the company beyond what you want to be paid, apply for a job, complete the interview.

If you couldn't figure this out on your own, I'm not sure you're ready for a career as a software engineer.

Brother, if you have the ability to be part of Apple Inc., I can advise you to build something in your own country.

There is no need to serve others

Do something great for yourself instead of doing something for others.

This will stay on the ground because it can't do what it wants to do.

THE SKY IS THE LIMIT.

Remember these words

Think outside the box and come up with something computer-related. And I'm sure they will hire you.

Working for Apple has been idealized by the media, the movies, etc. People I met in the San Jose / San Francisco area had stars in their eyes when they found out I was working for All-Mighty Apple.

They sure have great employee benefits. The best. They have good food for the employees. They even pay for dinner for certain engineering teams, if they stay after 7. Each reward has a price. Staying up late pays off, even when you could easily finish your work and collaborations and go home. The balance between work and life is something that worries them, but it is not. In fact, they pretend to care about many of the

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Working for Apple has been idealized by the media, the movies, etc. People I met in the San Jose / San Francisco area had stars in their eyes when they found out I was working for All-Mighty Apple.

They sure have great employee benefits. The best. They have good food for the employees. They even pay for dinner for certain engineering teams, if they stay after 7. Each reward has a price. Staying up late pays off, even when you could easily finish your work and collaborations and go home. The balance between work and life is something that worries them, but it is not. In fact, they pretend to care about many things that they don't care about.

The talent search, interview process, and hiring process make you feel like you're about to work with a lot of brilliant people on things that are important to you. The fact is, you will be on a team that may or may not want to collaborate.

Each person is the "smartest person in the room." Everybody is a leader. It has its jerks who will turn to top management with every issue, and who will be rewarded for doing so.

I was the only Ph.D. in my team. My manager asked that no one call me "Dr." because that's not the "apple way". In fact, this happened because a team member complained that the team didn't know who was "in charge" because I was a PhD. Apparently, he was threatened. Interestingly, I discovered that there are many other teams within special projects that have PhDs and have no problems. I wasn't asking my team to refer to me as "dr." My "teammate" had a problem with being introduced as "dr" during meetings. He was supposed to be in charge apparently.

I made the mistake of questioning the data that had been collected. Part of my job was to analyze data and data collection methods. The data was not standardized, which is very simple. That one question put me on the bad side of my manager. He moved me to another team and had me work on projects that I really didn't want to work on. I sucked it, they put me in my place.

There are a lot of brilliant people at Apple, but there are also a lot of selfish traitors who want to see you fail, as with many corporate cultures.

Management wants to rest on their past laurels and tell you all that they have accomplished. They are considered as "gods" of the apple. One that I worked with actually told me that it would threaten the license of contract workers (nurses) that we use in data collection, among many other insensitive things.

What made me re-evaluate my life and my work schedule was that I was in a car accident on the way to work one morning after spending time at Apple. They were putting me in an ambulance and all I could say / think was that I needed my phone to call work. The EMS team and the police assured me that they would receive my phone and call. Still, as soon as they gave me my phone, I called, emailed, etc. from the hospital. It took more than two days before someone checked on me. Even then, it was probably just because I called again to say that I guess they didn't care that I was in the hospital.

That really put things in perspective for me. It shows how important it really is and how expendable and replaceable it is, even in Apple Corporate.

Because only a small number of humans are ideally qualified to be a software engineer.

I believe that the quality and quantity of highly competent software engineers will probably remain constant now and in the future.

Software engineering is perhaps the easiest way to make a very good living, but it only suits a small majority of people as it requires specific intellectual and personality traits. For example, software engineering requires a combination of creativity and attention to detail that often contradict each other. For me, it suited me well, but many others find that it is less than opting

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Because only a small number of humans are ideally qualified to be a software engineer.

I believe that the quality and quantity of highly competent software engineers will probably remain constant now and in the future.

Software engineering is perhaps the easiest way to make a very good living, but it only suits a small majority of people as it requires specific intellectual and personality traits. For example, software engineering requires a combination of creativity and attention to detail that often contradict each other. For me, it suited me well, but many others find that it is not optimal for their career.

There is also limited demand for average software engineers, as their work is secondary and limited in scope, typically in the areas of existing codebase support and quality assurance. Average software engineers are replaceable and of limited use.

That is why the quality and quantity of software engineers is essentially limited in the long term.

The ability to create and innovate by designing new solutions to previously unsolved difficult problems is what matters in the end in terms of maximizing economic value and returns.

The typical functional option is to have a small group / team of 10x or 100x software engineers in a small venture capital - Silicon Valley funded by Wikipedia - Wikipedia Initial Public Offering - Wikipedia Startup Company - Wikipedia. I worked in 25 companies in 32 years, mainly in small startups in Silicon Valley: Wikipedia. The business economic model is stellar.

Creativity and excellence are what matters in the end, as a brute force with a large average group of software engineers does not produce anything of unique / high economic value.

High-tech developers are paid with good salaries and employee stock compensation, as Silicon Valley, Wikipedia is perhaps the most economically productive place on the planet.

Economically unproductive areas without high paying jobs have the unsolvable and intractable economic problem. There's only one Silicon Valley - Wikipedia and it's not moving anywhere as everyone in the tech industry has come and will continue to come here.

This is a big problem since Silicon Valley: Wikipedia will likely be the last place on Earth to have jobs for human workers. I wish the rest of the United States and the world would realize that this time it is different. Those jobs in Kansas will never come back.

Silicon Valley - Wikipedia drives automation that has been going on for decades and will continue as an irreversible process as ever cheaper, ever smarter automated machines permanently replace costlier human workers.

Jeff Ronne's answer to Is automation a friend or a foe?

"Never" is too strong, but I see where you come from and I have some theories.

First, some statistics. I went to Carnegie Mellon and some of my friends went to work at Apple as designers or engineers. Here are the stats for the class of 2015:

Electrical and Computer Engineering


Above Facebook (1) and just below Google (7). Note that a person entered the hardware, which you would expect to be completed by ECE students, not CS students.

Complete ECE statistics here

computer's science


Full stats here

Ok, so computer science students go to Facebook (15), Google (32), Microsoft (12), Pinterest, Airbnb, etc.

Design school


Not again

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"Never" is too strong, but I see where you come from and I have some theories.

First, some statistics. I went to Carnegie Mellon and some of my friends went to work at Apple as designers or engineers. Here are the stats for the class of 2015:

Electrical and Computer Engineering


Above Facebook (1) and just below Google (7). Note that a person entered the hardware, which you would expect to be completed by ECE students, not CS students.

Complete ECE statistics here

computer's science


Full stats here

Ok, so computer science students go to Facebook (15), Google (32), Microsoft (12), Pinterest, Airbnb, etc.

Design school


Again, not nothing, and it's definitely not statistically significant, but not as big as, say, Facebook or Amazon.

When I was in college, I never considered working at Apple as a recent graduate, even though I loved their products. I have friends at Apple who will disagree with me, but this is just a reflection of how personal my thought process was at the time:

  • Apple is an old-fashioned hierarchical corporate structure and they are quite honest about it.
  • You probably won't get a chance to shape the products you love for a while. So it's very implicitly clear that you'll probably be a small part of something small, which doesn't sound like all the fun things Facebook would say about "impact" etc.
  • Team assignment is opaque. Teams who like you will contact you and interview you. As a recent graduate, these are rarely the cutting edge things that excite you. Meanwhile, Facebook promises a boot camp where you can choose what excites you.
  • Product decisions are made top-down from Jony Ive. and company. so autonomy is not really expected.
  • Product development is slow and cautious and sometimes takes years. Young people disproportionately value speed and fast shipping.
  • The technical pile can often be old and cramped. They don't always use cutting edge frameworks and languages.
  • Apple is really secretive. Young people like to share what they do with their friends. They also go out when they ask the people who work at Apple what they do and cannot answer.
  • Apple doesn't pay much better. Google and Facebook are competitive on salaries, so it comes down to profit.
  • The perks on Facebook and Google sound cooler: free food, colorful things, office skating. These things sounded good at 22 years old. They still do it.
  • The median age is higher at Apple and it didn't help the impression of age and gender diversity when all the keynote speakers at highly visible product events are older men.
  • Most of the people you see succeeding at Apple come from overseas as seasoned hires, or if it was through the ranks, then they've been around for a long time. As a 21-year-old, you don't feel very well.


That's all I can think of from the top of my head. If anything else comes to mind, I'll update this. I think Apple just found a really good system to do great things and youth is not as much a part of their cultural DNA as Google or Facebook, and they are comfortable with that.

I can think of other really good companies that are like this, for example Netflix (see Why aren't there interns on Netflix?).

I worked at Apple for 2 years and change. I have been working at Google for a few years. This is a reflection of Apple in 2006 or so. These are my personal opinions, and they are just that: opinions.

Google and Apple are very different. Apple has a design DNA. Google has a technological DNA. You will feel this everywhere. Google is functional, it is about solving a difficult problem. Apple is about designing something that looks good, it's about selling it and making money.

Apple has a different feel. It's the "I'm cool" feeling. It's the look, we made this thing look cooler and prettier and now there's also ma

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I worked at Apple for 2 years and change. I have been working at Google for a few years. This is a reflection of Apple in 2006 or so. These are my personal opinions, and they are just that: opinions.

Google and Apple are very different. Apple has a design DNA. Google has a technological DNA. You will feel this everywhere. Google is functional, it is about solving a difficult problem. Apple is about designing something that looks good, it's about selling it and making money.

Apple has a different feel. It's the "I'm cool" feeling. It's the looks, we made this look cooler and prettier and now there are too many people vying for discounted things for their employees. Fundamentally, Apple was founded and run by a salesperson (Steve Wozniak was sidelined). And very good at it. Google was started and run by three types of Doctor of Philosophy degrees. It gives you a "knowledge is cool" feeling. The campus feels like a university.

My manager at Apple told me that it is a hardware company and that software is not the top priority. This affects Apple, and software engineering is undoubtedly a second-class citizen.

Working at Apple is like working in armies (not specific). Sure you may ask why you should jump into the river, but you better be soaked before asking that question. This may be an exaggeration, but again, it is my opinion. It's hard to be a troublemaker and controversial character at Apple.

Furthermore, as an individual collaborator, your access to information and people internally will be restricted. The company will look like a set of watertight compartments, which will magically stay afloat. Of course it isn't, but as an individual contributor, you won't see anything other than the things you should (for the most part) see.

When I joined Apple, I lowered the average age of my 6-person engineering group by about 3 years. And it is that the people of Apple will not appreciate how I formulated the last observation; like a puzzle.

If you are smart, ambitious and an engineer, never look up to the 95014. Never.

Like I said, these are my opinions. I am not making any legal claims.

Practice data structures and algorithms safely. I got a job offer from Google Warsaw right out of college. I mostly credit my experience of participating in many coding contests for that, as it helped me develop great problem-solving acumen. I will post my Google interview experience here:

I contacted a recruiter I knew to schedule full-time SWE interviews.

I had my first round online in October 2018. I was asked an easy tree problem and I was able to do it in 30 minutes. We then discussed how we could parallelize some of the parts of my solution for the same problem and t

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Practice data structures and algorithms safely. I got a job offer from Google Warsaw right out of college. I mostly credit my experience of participating in many coding contests for that, as it helped me develop great problem-solving acumen. I will post my Google interview experience here:

I contacted a recruiter I knew to schedule full-time SWE interviews.

I had my first round online in October 2018. I was asked an easy tree problem and I was able to do it in 30 minutes. We then discussed how we could parallelize some of the parts of my solution to the same problem and the interview concluded.

My second round online was in November 2018. If I remember correctly, it was about finding a way in a BST. We discuss the case in multiple ways, etc. and then I was able to find a semi-optimal solution. My interviewer gave me a hint and I was able to find the optimal solution and code it way ahead of time. I made it through this round and was invited for on-site interviews in London.

My on-site interviews took place in December 2018. In fact, I went to the wrong Google office in the morning! But since I left early, I had some extra time, so I ran to the right office and was able to arrive at the last minute. He was supposed to have 4 algorithmic interviews and a Googliness interview.

My first interviewer showed me the office. Then the rounds of interviews began.

For my first round I was asked a medium difficulty bit manipulation question. This round was pretty good and I was able to finish the round 5 minutes early.

For my second round they asked me a graphic question. I explained my solution and they asked me to write the code to build just the graph instead of solving the whole question. This round also went quite well.

Next, I had the googliness round. It's basically a behavioral round, so they asked me questions like what are my expectations when working at Google, what criteria do I use to prioritize projects, etc. This round was meh because I don't have a lot of work experience so I was only able to give slightly vague answers to questions. But I wasn't too worried because I think it's an experimental round that only happens in some Google offices (London is one of them).

I had my lunch break, ate light.

The third round was the hardest. It was a graphic question about permutation rings. It took me a bit of time to find the solution and I wasn't really sure about it. But the interviewer said my test was fine, so I coded it. I had 1-2 trivial errors that I fixed after the interviewer pointed them out. I think this was my strongest round as tough questions can go a long way in distinguishing algorithmic ability and my competitive programming background helped a lot here.

The fourth round was based on trees and basic probability. It was easy-medium and I was able to code without any errors so this round went well too.

After the new year I got a call from my recruiter saying that my interview scores were good enough to move on to the host search phase. In this phase, my recruiter basically tried to find a team on Google for me. I was paired with the Google Cloud team in Warsaw and got my offer in April.

As you can see, most of my rounds were based on data structures and algorithms, so my experience in programming competition helped a lot in clearing these rounds.

I recommend that you start entering coding contests right away. To get started, look at some of my answers:

Sameer Gulati's answer to How should I get started in competitive programming?

Sameer Gulati's answer to What made you good at competitive programming?

About 2-3 months before the interview, switch to troubleshooting at Leetcode, CareerCup, etc. to gain experience in solving interview problems. Having a little experience in competitive programming will make solving these problems much easier for you.

There are varying degrees of difficulty in becoming an engineer at Apple. First, if you have the right technical skills they are looking for and are talented, Apple will look for you no matter what college you graduate from.

Second, it's often not just a small technical skill. There is a possibility that they are looking for personal altercations that make you an excellent team player.

Lastly, they are probably looking for future leaders and the managers were creative too. There is one thing only to be technical, there was another thing to be creative and that is what they are looking for is creativity.

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There are varying degrees of difficulty in becoming an engineer at Apple. First, if you have the right technical skills they are looking for and are talented, Apple will look for you no matter what college you graduate from.

Second, it's often not just a small technical skill. There is a possibility that they are looking for personal altercations that make you an excellent team player.

Lastly, they are probably looking for future leaders and the managers were creative too. There is one thing just to be technical, there was another thing to be creative and that is what they are looking for is creative talent with technical ability.

It's hard to have all those skills and talents in one person.

Please forgive any punctuation, spelling or grammar errors. I am using Dragon NaturallySpeaking for iPhone.

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