How do I get a programming job where I make $ 150,000 + a year?

Updated on : January 21, 2022 by Maliah Ross



How do I get a programming job where I make $ 150,000 + a year?

I just turned down a $ 250,000 job offer to stay at my $ 150,000 job, so maybe I can talk about this.

The answer is brutally simple. How important are your skills to the bottom line, how replaceable are you, and how likely are you to leave?

If the chance of you leaving is zero, you will get a modest annual salary increase. You won't see big jumps in salary until you have a competitive offer.

At that point the other two factors come into play. There will be some cost to replace it, but if your abilities are not unique and you are not considered to be making a critical contribution, that replacement cost

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I just turned down a $ 250,000 job offer to stay at my $ 150,000 job, so maybe I can talk about this.

The answer is brutally simple. How important are your skills to the bottom line, how replaceable are you, and how likely are you to leave?

If the chance of you leaving is zero, you will get a modest annual salary increase. You won't see big jumps in salary until you have a competitive offer.

At that point the other two factors come into play. There will be some cost to replace it, but if your abilities are not unique and you are not considered to be making a critical contribution, that replacement cost will be quite low and the counter offer will reflect this. The same is true if your abilities are unique but do not directly contribute to the end result.

If your skills are unique and critical, and you have a competitive offer, that's where you will see your salary increase by 50% or more. If you're doing that every two to three years, then it's not hard to get $ 300k - $ 600k as a programmer (or, in my case, optimizing for non-salary benefits, which means a lot more to me right now).

How do you develop unique critical skills?

First, you need to work somewhere where your skills are important. There is no point in becoming a 10X programmer in a company where a 2X programmer is all they need (and all they are willing to pay for).

Second, you need to anticipate what your manager needs and what your manager needs from your manager. You will be appreciated if you do what they tell you, but there are many programmers who are happy to do that, that is not a unique skill. Get the big picture, uncover business issues and coding issues, and be seen as the coder who comes up with ideas and executes them.

Third, make everyone around you better. Spread the credit and take the blame. Don't hoard information and don't become the choke point, that only reduces the cost of letting go.

Lastly, and least importantly, know how to code well enough that those skills aren't the ones holding you back. Coding skills are great, but they are fairly common and not that expensive to buy. Finding someone who can "see beyond the horizon" or convert a team or design an architecture that is easier to maintain is much more difficult and much more critical to the success of a business. Finding someone who can influence customers is even more difficult and critical. So yeah, make sure your coding skills are high enough that they're never a problem. But if you have the option of making a series of customer visits to the site or learning another programming language, get out there and talk to your customers.

Jeffrey Fox has published a book called "How to Become a CEO." There are many things that are surprisingly relevant to someone trying to move up the career ladder. I highly recommend it, even (especially) if you never want to get into management.

It's unrealistic to expect $ 150k at this point in your junior programming career.

The highest-paying programmer jobs are likely to be in systems design for high-speed market trading, but you'll need advanced degrees in computer science and finance, and many years of experience to get these jobs. And they are incredibly stressful. I dont think it's worth it.

On average, you can expect salary increases of about 3-4% per year if you stay in the same job at the same company. At that rate of increase, it will take about 30 years for his salary of $ 50,000 to reach $ 150,000.

If you are ambitious with change

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It's unrealistic to expect $ 150k at this point in your junior programming career.

The highest-paying programmer jobs are likely to be in systems design for high-speed market trading, but you'll need advanced degrees in computer science and finance, and many years of experience to get these jobs. And they are incredibly stressful. I dont think it's worth it.

On average, you can expect salary increases of about 3-4% per year if you stay in the same job at the same company. At that rate of increase, it will take about 30 years for his salary of $ 50,000 to reach $ 150,000.

If you have ambitions to change roles or change companies, you may get a 10-20% salary increase per move. Stay at each job for two years, so you can learn from it before moving on. At this rate of increase (4% annual increase, except for the 20% increase every 3 years), it will take approximately 14 years to reach $ 150K.

His starting salary of $ 50,000 seems a bit low. You should research what the market rates are on Salary.com or Glassdoor.com. For example, the median salary in America for a "Software Developer I" is nearly $ 60K, according to Salary.com. If it had started at $ 60K and advanced as I described above, it could reach $ 150K in 11 years.

Also consider that location is an important factor. The highest salaries for programmers are in San Francisco, perhaps 35% higher than the US average, but the cost of living there is equally higher, so you end up without a better lifestyle. If you can work in SF but commute from out of town, you can save more money. Do some searches for "affordable places to live in the bay area." Keep in mind that affordable often means low crime or high crime, and long trips can be exhausting.

The median salary for a "Software Developer I" in San Francisco is $ 72,000 according to Salary.com. If I had started with this salary and progressed as I described above, it could reach $ 150K in 8 years.

Read a book on wage negotiation. Liked Negotiating Your Salary: How to Make $ 1000 a Minute: MA Jack Chapman. Learning to negotiate well can save you years in increasing your salary.

Pay attention to your professional growth. Look for opportunities to gain in-demand technical expertise, which you'll then use as a lever to shop around for a more senior job. If you can't get that experience on the job, spend your free time doing freelance projects and learning state-of-the-art technology. I say "invest" here deliberately, because you will get a reward for the time you put in.

Read on about tech trends. Sometimes, if your time is exceptionally good, you can learn a skill that is in high demand, such as mobile programming today. What will it be in 2 to 5 years? No one knows for sure. People ask that question frequently on Quora, but they are basically asking for divination. Just do your best to learn good basic skills in programming methods, software design, debugging, teamwork, architecture. Then you can apply those skills to any new language or platform that emerges.

Should you try to be self-employed? This is complicated. If you're good at marketing, you may be able to take up your time and earn twice your usual hourly wage. But the risk is that you have gaps between contracts and have to pay for your own vacation, health coverage, and payroll taxes. It's a lot of work being a freelance programmer, you're basically running yourself as a sole proprietorship business.

You can get a career boost if you go into management. You practically leave coding behind and move on to supervising, recruiting, budgeting ... you can earn more, but that's a different career and it's not for everyone.

I've seen programmers switch to a sales career. If you can become a high-priced software sales engineer, you could earn a lot in commissions. But again, it doesn't suit everyone's personality.

Wherever you go, take advantage of 401 (k) and employee stock purchase programs (ESPP) where available. These can help you stretch your earnings a bit more.

Treat stock options like a virtual game. It's fun to imagine becoming a millionaire in a startup, but remember that most startups fail and then stock options are worth nothing.

Work hard on projects that you enjoy. Why in the projects that you enjoy? Because if you don't enjoy them, you will burn very quickly. What if your job is not exciting? Strip him for a year or two and then move to a company where you will believe in work and enjoy it.

In the meantime, look for open source projects that you find interesting. Contribute as much as possible. Or work on your own projects. Create some applications. Or both. Either way, work on projects and get them done. Don't just make a new one each week for resume creators. A company is not going to put you on your resume,

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Work hard on projects that you enjoy. Why in the projects that you enjoy? Because if you don't enjoy them, you will burn very quickly. What if your job is not exciting? Strip him for a year or two and then move to a company where you will believe in work and enjoy it.

In the meantime, look for open source projects that you find interesting. Contribute as much as possible. Or work on your own projects. Create some applications. Or both. Either way, work on projects and get them done. Don't just make a new one each week for resume creators. A company is not going to leave you because of your resume, but because of your real-world skills. So build them as much as you can.

Also, companies love to see you show in your spare time because then they know that you really enjoy it.

You can also start taking master's classes if that's more your style.

But in the end it will be your skills and experience that will take you to that level, and the best and fastest way to do it is to spend time with it. Have you heard of the 10,000 hour rule? If not, you should check it out. Basically it takes 10,000 hours to master something. So the faster you get to that, theoretically, the sooner you'll be worth that $ 150k / yr.

Hi

, I think you are doing this the wrong way, there are artificial intelligence jobs that pay between £ 400-500 per day, but this requires the appropriate level of dexterity to work.

These types of posts are far from my mind at the moment, in the junior stage it is a time consuming problem solving point, a baby first crawls and then learns to walk. If you are looking for those kinds of salaries, you will need to have a very good C ++, preferably without using anything before the C ++ 11 standard, you will also need to practice Boost.

Needless to say, you will need a very solid understanding of reinf

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Hi

I think you are doing this the wrong way, there are artificial intelligence jobs that pay 400-500 pounds a day but this requires the right level of dexterity to work with.

These types of posts are far from my mind at the moment. In the junior stage it is a point to solve problems that takes time, a baby first crawls and then learns to walk. If you are looking for those kinds of salaries, you will need to have a very good C ++, preferably without using anything before the C ++ 11 standard, you will also need to practice Boost.

It goes without saying that you will need a very strong understanding of reinforcement learning, supervised learning, and unsupervised learning algorithms for contemporary neural topologies, backpropagation techniques, and neural network algorithms. neural network testing and training, linear separability testing, and multi-layer deep learning. It is not enough to know the algorithms, but you should know whether a neural algorithm will work in a new situation and how to design and implement effective neural algorithms. Neural algorithms are modeled in the brain, which is a series of networks, and adjust themselves by propagating backwards.

You will need great skill in evolutionary algorithms, Solis Wets, single solution metaheuristics (algorithms that do not require a specific hypothesis), understand the No Free Lunch Theorem (NFTL), and know how to apply the NFLT algorithm. Most of the time it's just figuring out which theorem to apply in which context, the NFTL doesn't work well in continuous optimization problems. This is just one example, there are many artificial intelligence algorithms to use, each with its own unique derivation and in a novel situation, you must derive the appropriate algorithm to suit the occasion.

Optimization problems are generally easy to formulate and translate into mathematical algorithms, but solving them is challenging. Even in simple mathematical algorithms, who still has time to calculate the Hessian matrix and solve a problem with many variables analytically?

Then there are the traditional heuristic algorithms, the S algorithm and the Rosenbrock, Nelder-Mead algorithm, etc., these algorithms seek by exploring the gradient in uncertain areas to find a plausible sweet spot, this is a big problem in high modality problems where there are many local optimum, because you have to code an algorithm in your code that searches using the gradient but there are thousands of local optimum,

The next best option would be a stochastic algorithm that you would implement in your code, but you need to know the tradeoffs of stochastic algorithms compared to heuristics, a stochastic algorithm that basically looks for the global space instead of looking for the gradient, this method produces results that they are optimal compared to heuristic search algorithms, but these algorithms are not optimal relative to gradient and as such may require additional mathematical fine tuning.

An artificial intelligence engineer must be well versed in various mathematical algorithms and how they work in certain contexts and what kind of algorithm can be used in a new situation. Then the performance of the algorithm and how to code these algorithms correctly in your implementation to avoid poor performance and stay within the computational budget, in fact when designing a mathematical search algorithm all of these need to be considered.

Therefore, an artificial intelligence engineer with that salary must know contemporary neural networks and evolutionary algorithms and how to correctly optimize neural networks and population-based search algorithms, and how to correctly formulate algorithms in novel situations. .

I am an artificial intelligence engineer, but I think that with that salary you have to know several areas and excel in them. I'm an artificial intelligence engineer so this is based on artificial intelligence and basically half of what we do is math and the other half is programming :)

The labor market follows the rules of any other market in a capitalist society; mainly, supply and demand.

"Programming" is a large industry spanning many different disciplines and practices, with a wide gap in experience and knowledge between the least capable and the most capable programmers. We can deduce which jobs will pay the most by applying supply and demand.

A combination of two factors will produce the highest salary. One, the greater the number of candidates required to meet the current industry need for a given set of criteria, the higher the salary tends to be. Two, the bottom n

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The labor market follows the rules of any other market in a capitalist society; mainly, supply and demand.

"Programming" is a large industry spanning many different disciplines and practices, with a wide gap in experience and knowledge between the least capable and the most capable programmers. We can deduce which jobs will pay the most by applying supply and demand.

A combination of two factors will produce the highest salary. One, the greater the number of candidates required to meet the current industry need for a given set of criteria, the higher the salary tends to be. Second, the lower the number of people (in absolute terms) who are actually capable of meeting a certain set of criteria, the higher the salary tends to be.

Of course, for the highest salary offers, you need both factors to work for you. If you have a very particular skill cross-section that only a dozen people in the world could qualify for, but the industry demands, say, 2 or 3 positions that meet those criteria, you may not be able to get one of those highs. - paid jobs. You may still be able to get a job, doing a higher demand job that doesn't use your specialized skills, but it won't pay as much.

On the other hand, if you possess skills that are in extremely high demand, where the industry seeks to hire thousands of people like you, your salary will be a function of how many qualified applicants are coming in to meet this demand - if there are only a few hundred you, and the industry is looking for thousands, your salary will be high. If there are a few thousand jobs and hundreds of thousands of well-qualified candidates, they will greatly reduce your salary offers.

Now when I mentioned "criteria" above, note that:

  • "Skills" (things you know or can do) and "experience" (how long you've been in the industry) aren't the only criteria that matter.
  • Experience can sometimes have a negative connotation, if you are looking to hire young people, because less experienced work tends to be less paid work and a company may feel that it cannot pay the salary that an experienced person asks for.
  • Some jobs artificially restrict your pool of candidates significantly due to business requirements or operating conditions that have nothing to do with what you know or how long you have been employed in the software industry. For example, jobs that require a government clearance tend to be much more difficult for companies to fill (and therefore pay more for the same skill level) compared to jobs that do not require a clearance, because getting high levels of government authorization is difficult. intensive, and not everyone qualifies (specifically, non-U.S. citizens are often excluded from the higher levels of clearance, which prevents most foreign-born citizens from competing with you for those jobs; and even a significant percentage of U.S. citizens have had enough trouble with the law in their past that they '


That said, setting your sights on get rich quick while trying to adjust to a particular industry that appears to be paying well can backfire on you. Many people simply lack the skills, qualifications, and / or experience to be able to earn $ 150K / year no matter what they do.

That amount is well above average for an individual and is more than the median household income in the richest state in the U.S. Given that $ 150K / year is well above average, it stands to reason that if it were easy and common to possess the qualifications or selection criteria that would allow you to land a $ 150K / year job, then this figure would be much closer to the median individual salary, rather than well above average. But if it were average, then your purchasing power at $ 150K would tend to adjust accordingly; what I mean is that the prices of the most common items would be inflated in kind, and you would be no more or less better off than you make $ 50k today.

Trying to earn a high salary is a relatively honest and simple way to earn more money, compared to trying to pick winners on the stock market, gambling, etc. Yet even with this seemingly pedestrian effort to earn more money, most people (by definition, due to the statistical distribution of wages) will find that, even with years of deliberate effort on their part, the opportunity to earn Close to $ 150K / year can be difficult to reach for your entire career.

You must be worth $ 150,000 + pa! In my experience with programmers, some are worth ten or twenty times more than the average - they will do something in a few days that others claim will take months.

You have to be one of those guys ... then it demands a lot of money ... if you don't get it ... move until you get it

That is a lot of nonsense. There may be some temporary wage inflation due to some large companies paying a ton of money to the most important people and moving the curve.

The median household income in Palo Alto is about $ 160,000. That is usually with two wage earners.

Palo Alto residents earn the third highest median household income

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