How do I get a job at Google like new?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Meredith Hoffman



How do I get a job at Google like new?

Undergraduate university? It happens, but it is quite rare. (But then they hire other people without ever having been to college.)

Outside of graduate school, master's or doctorate? It is much more likely, but the odds are not good yet.

Most of them have given the answers, so I don't need to repeat the same.

However, watch the movie "The Internship" before entering the world of GOOGLE.

Best wishes

Yes!! For that, it must be minimal in IIT, NIT, or IIIT, or in the best engineering universities.

You must have great knowledge to get a job like new. They will do about 8 rounds.

For the experienced person, the number of rounds will be less and it will be easier to compare with the freshest.

At the end of 2017 I interviewed on Google. In the months leading up to the interviews, I prepared a lot. I would like to share how I think one should prepare for such an interview and give some advice.

Opinions are mine.

How to prepare

I like to separate the preparation into three parts:

  • Theory
  • Coding problems
  • System architecture questions

Theory

This includes everything that you are expected to know as a software engineer. Things like: complexity analysis, data structures, algorithms, bit manipulation, operating systems, multithreading, system architecture, numbers, how hardware and networking works, to name a few. the

Keep reading

At the end of 2017 I interviewed on Google. In the months leading up to the interviews, I prepared a lot. I would like to share how I think one should prepare for such an interview and give some advice.

Opinions are mine.

How to prepare

I like to separate the preparation into three parts:

  • Theory
  • Coding problems
  • System architecture questions

Theory

This includes everything that you are expected to know as a software engineer. Things like: complexity analysis, data structures, algorithms, bit manipulation, operating systems, multithreading, system architecture, numbers, how hardware and networking works, to name a few. It is a combination of things you will learn in school, from work experience, and reading books, blogs, research, etc.

You can find all my notes here:

  • https://github.com/orrsella/soft-eng-interview-prep

Coding problems

Most of what you will do during an interview is write code to solve various problems (other things will be technical discussions, questions about the system architecture, and your own questions). They will typically require a few dozen lines at most (difficult to put much more than that on a whiteboard in ~ 40 minutes). The best way to prepare for these is to simply practice and solve as many as you can.

The best resources I used to practice question coding are:

  • Coding Interview, 6th Edition
  • Elements of programming interviews

My recommendation would be to get at least one of these books and figure it out cover to cover. There are many other online tools such as LeetCode and various question banks. Once you are comfortable solving these types of questions, search Glassdoor for some real questions that you were recently asked during interviews at the company you are interviewing for.

System architecture questions

These are a completely different beast than coding questions. They are much more nuanced and involve much more talking / explaining and hardly any actual code. Preparing for these is more difficult and less straightforward, especially if you haven't worked on distributed systems before.

Rules

Some tips, in no particular order:

  • Write real code that works, not pseudocode
  • Opt for a conventional programming language (Java, C / C ++, Python, JavaScript) 5
  • Practice coding on a whiteboard6
  • Practice coding on paper (preferably blank, no lines)
  • Write clean code - use good names (classes / functions / variables) Show good modularity (classes / functions) Allow time for error checking and TODOextreme cases , even better to start with them (or add s for yourself) Yes you are clipping corners say it out loud and say what you would do if you had more time (eg in Java: I am using public fields for brevity here, but otherwise I would use getters / setters)
  • Use proper algorithms and data structures and be sure to state Big-O for all of them
  • When tackling a problem for the first time: make sure you understand the task. Repeat this to prove it to yourself and the interviewer. Don't start writing code right away! Ask questions about homework, inputs, assumptions, formats; Most of the questions are specified on purpose on purpose. Don't assume anything! Or say you are doing it Think out loud, share what you are thinking (brainstorm) Try to show how you think about the topic Silence is not good, lengths are bad Make sure the interviewer has a clear idea of ​​how you're doing it (so they can help!) Start with a simple example, then add the detailed ones. Clarify the problem function signature from the beginning.
  • The questions are detailed, they usually do not have an easy solution (although they can be simple)
  • Think about input validation, limitations
  • Think of test cases, run them to make sure the code is correct (but don't assume it is correct, really check as if someone else wrote it)
  • If the interviewer gave examples / suggestions, use them
  • When you're done, ask if you can refine your code, improve variable names, extract other methods, and so on.
  • Leave out the trivial parts as functions that you need to implement and only go back to them if you have the time.
  • After the first solution is completed, please try to improve it or try to find a different solution that is better (ex: recursion vs imperative code)
  • Assumptions can now change, so the solution must adapt
  • Bypass standard APIs if you're not sure it's okay, be sure to state so and provide a reasonable API to work with
  1. This, and many other things in this post, also apply to other technology companies: YMMV.
  2. I recognize that the hiring process for these companies is controversial and that many people do not believe that they really evaluate their experience as a software engineer. I am deliberately ignoring this and assuming this is what you want. If you want to get an offer from these companies, this is the "game" you will have to play.
  3. I am thinking of this from the point of view of an engineer with 3-10 years of experience. I guess if you are a recent graduate, the expectations are a little different.
  4. You would be surprised how useful they could be.
  5. You will most likely be able to program in the language you want, but you will be better off if your interviewer knows your preferred language and can help you if you get stuck. These options increase the chances of that happening. ↩
  6. Seriously, buy a white board to practice at home. It will make you feel much more comfortable with it and you will learn to better manage the space in it.

I worked for Google for about 4 years and from my experience, being interviewed for roles at Google many times, both before my employment at Google and afterwards, for different roles while working there, I can say that there are many factors that influence the decision. of hiring someone for a position and sometimes they are not fair. Here are some factors that many people are unaware of.

1 - Does Google hire the smartest people?

No. I can say that Google's hiring process is most of the time very efficient and they do not hire the smartest people, but the most suitable for a certain position.

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I worked for Google for about 4 years and from my experience, being interviewed for roles at Google many times, both before my employment at Google and afterwards, for different roles while working there, I can say that there are many factors that influence the decision. of hiring someone for a position and sometimes they are not fair. Here are some factors that many people are unaware of.

1 - Does Google hire the smartest people?

No. I can say that Google's hiring process is most of the time very efficient and they do not hire the smartest people, but the most suitable for a certain role. They are really smart. It's not just about your knowledge and skills, it's also about how well you perform in that position.

2 - Is the Google interview process very difficult?

Yes and No. It depends. It will depend on the interviewer, recruiter and how long the position has been open, how quickly they need someone for the position, and the skills of other candidates. Some interviewers want to hire a copy of themselves and in this case, no matter how good you are, if you don't share the same style and personality as the hiring manager, you won't get the job.

3 - Most of the time they have someone in mind for the role.

I can explain that in more detail later, but at Google they need to interview multiple people for a position. Sometimes they loved the first candidate and when you showed up for the interview they already fell in love with someone else. However, they are still obliged to interview the other candidates and sometimes they will do it very badly because they see it as a waste of time. In cases like that, you will probably walk out of the interview feeling like you won't get the job.

4 - Are you always looking to hire the best candidate?

Not always. There are a lot of insider recommendations for roles, and unless the person someone referred you is really bad and you're incredibly good at what you do, chances are you won't get the role.

Google is the company where I saw the highest number of Googlers friends, husbands, wives, boyfriends, girlfriends, brothers and sisters hired. In my team, at least 25% of the people have a family member or someone very close who works at Google.

5 - Heart rate can be very lazy

You have to think in terms of supply and demand to understand the recruitment process at Google. They have hundreds, sometimes thousands of people applying for a position on Google. They don't need to scout for talent (although most of the time they do), they already have millions of people wanting to work for them.

For that reason, recruiters are sometimes really disorganized and don't care much about you and can't send you enough information that you will need to perform well in the interview.

But that is not the rule. I believe that most of the time they do a decent job and in their defense they receive thousands of applications a month, 95% of the time from people who are not suitable for the position.

6 - You need to be lucky

I have a friend at Google who said that his technical interview questions were very similar to the questions he had been practicing in a book on technical interview questions. He was fortunate to be prepared to answer all the questions correctly and faster. I know another guy who is really normal, but who worked with a Googler at an agency and when a position became available they recommended him for the position.

You have to keep in mind that the hiring process in Google is not perfect. I think there is a lot of decision-making power in the hiring manager's hand.

7 - There are many average people

One thing you hear a lot during your first few months at Google is about imposter syndrome. Google has amazing people working for them and some of the brightest people I had the pleasure of working with I met at Google. However, there are also many average people. What you don't see is anyone below average. Everyone has at least enough skills to do a reasonable job. I think Google is good at providing a fertile environment for personal growth. It also challenges you to keep improving, but still, there are some folks who are happy enough to be on Google and not worried about improvement.

8 - Non-technical roles

Non-technical roles are the most difficult because it is difficult to establish the correct success metrics for a candidate. Technical roles are easier because 70% of the process is to show that you have great skills and your methods to solve a problem.

When it comes to non-technical roles it is very easy to get a false positive. It's not hard to cheat the process if you're really good at interviewing or the hiring manager isn't very skilled either. I worked for a large, well-known company where the team leader was not really trained and unprepared for his role, but his manager (the department director) was also untrained and unprepared. So if you're applying for a position where hiring managers are bad at what they do, chances are they will hire someone just as bad as they are. In my case, I was hired because someone else with great influence in the company decided that I was the right candidate.

9 - Googleness

You hear a lot about Googleness, but I think that as long as you don't do something really awkward or unprofessional during the interview, Googleness isn't that important. Googleness is a "metric" that shows how apt you are to work in the Google environment.

For starters, you will want to graduate before trying to apply for a job at Google India because otherwise it will be quite difficult to make up for the lack of a degree without at least five years of relevant work experience. After that, assuming you want to become a software engineer, you should be in a good place to apply for the job once you meet these minimum qualifications (and hopefully some of the preferred qualifications as well):

# 1 MINIMUM RATINGS (GOOGLE INDIA, SWE POSITION)

  • Bachelor's degree in Computer Science, Electrical or Computer Engineering, or equivalent practical experience
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For starters, you will want to graduate before trying to apply for a job at Google India because otherwise it will be quite difficult to make up for the lack of a degree without at least five years of relevant work experience. After that, assuming you want to become a software engineer, you should be in a good place to apply for the job once you meet these minimum qualifications (and hopefully some of the preferred qualifications as well):

# 1 MINIMUM RATINGS (GOOGLE INDIA, SWE POSITION)

  • Bachelor's degree in Computer Science, Electrical or Computer Engineering, or equivalent practical experience
  • 5 years of relevant work experience
  • Programming experience in one or more of the following languages: C, C ++, Java and / or Python

# 2 PREFERRED RATINGS (GOOGLE INDIA, SWE POSITION)

  • Computer science background, with competencies in data structures, algorithms, or API design
  • Experience automation and scaling of mobile or web backends
  • Experience with the development of full-stack or back-end applications
  • Knowledge of mobile application development on Android and detection technologies.
  • Ability to learn other coding languages ​​as needed

If you have these minimum qualifications, you should be able to apply for the job, while having the preferred qualifications makes the likelihood of being hired by Google India much higher. It would also be advantageous for your CS degree to come from an IIT, but having a CS degree is better than not having one regardless of where you come from.

Another thing you could do while preparing for your Google India interview would be to participate in a side project - I mention this because Google India will be much more interested in your application if you have been involved in a successful side project (developed an app with thousands of downloads in the Play Store, for example) because this means that it is capable of both developing software and attracting an audience.

Perhaps the most useful thing you could do to get the job, however, is to perform excellently in the Google India interview process. For this, you will need to prepare for three main topics that will be tested: soft skills, data structures and algorithms, and systems design.

# 3 SOFT SKILLS

I talk about this topic first because it will be one of the first to be evaluated by your interviewers, along with data structures and algorithms to a lesser extent. The interview process always begins with a phone interview where Google India will determine whether or not you are a cultural fit for the company, and it is important that you know how to show Googliness so that you can make a lasting impression so early in the interview. .

This topic is also the easiest to prepare. By having a solid understanding of DS&A fundamentals and by reading a book like What Color is Your Parachute ?, which is packed with unique case studies and approaches that you can use to learn how to demonstrate why you are the best candidate for the work, you should do well in your phone interview.

# 4 DATA STRUCTURES AND ALGORITHMS

This topic is the one that other candidates often prioritize, and for good reason: after all, you'll need to be pretty good at this topic to be able to answer the programming questions that are presented to you, most of which are moderate to Difficulty. hard. I suggest you tackle the theory of this topic first and the practice second.

Fortunately, you have many options for doing this when it comes to resources. For example, you could use a website like GeeksforGeeks, an online portal that acts as a library for a host of computer-related topics, and then you could use a book like Cracking The Coding Interview to solve programming questions specific to the company.

# 5 SYSTEM DESIGN

This topic is relevant because of Google India's interest in its candidates' ability to design scalable systems as a web-based company. This topic is also prioritized by other candidates (although perhaps not as much as DS&A), and the difficulty of these design-related questions will be on par with the difficulty of the other coding questions.

Ideally, you also want to tackle the theory of this topic first and the practice second. To do this, you can enroll in a course like Tech Interview Pro, an interview preparation program designed by a former Google software engineer that has two detailed modules on systems design covering concepts like load balancing, caching. , CDN, databases, redundancy. and replication, database fragmentation, and API design, and then you could use a site like CareerCup to find design-related questions and practice what you've learned.

Good luck with your interviews.

Practice data structures and algorithms safely. I got a job offer from Google Warsaw right out of college. I mostly credit my experience of participating in many coding contests for that, as it helped me develop great problem-solving acumen. I will post my Google interview experience here:

I contacted a recruiter I knew to schedule full-time SWE interviews.

I had my first round online in October 2018. I was asked an easy tree problem and I was able to do it in 30 minutes. We then discussed how we could parallelize some of the parts of my solution for the same problem and t

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Practice data structures and algorithms safely. I got a job offer from Google Warsaw right out of college. I mostly credit my experience of participating in many coding contests for that, as it helped me develop great problem-solving acumen. I will post my Google interview experience here:

I contacted a recruiter I knew to schedule full-time SWE interviews.

I had my first round online in October 2018. I was asked an easy tree problem and I was able to do it in 30 minutes. We then discussed how we could parallelize some of the parts of my solution to the same problem and the interview concluded.

My second round online was in November 2018. If I remember correctly, it was about finding a way in a BST. We discuss the case in multiple ways, etc. and then I was able to find a semi-optimal solution. My interviewer gave me a hint and I was able to find the optimal solution and code it way ahead of time. I made it through this round and was invited for on-site interviews in London.

My on-site interviews took place in December 2018. In fact, I went to the wrong Google office in the morning! But since I left early, I had some extra time, so I ran to the right office and was able to arrive at the last minute. He was supposed to have 4 algorithmic interviews and a Googliness interview.

My first interviewer showed me the office. Then the rounds of interviews began.

For my first round I was asked a medium difficulty bit manipulation question. This round was pretty good and I was able to finish the round 5 minutes early.

For my second round they asked me a graphic question. I explained my solution and they asked me to write the code to build just the graph instead of solving the whole question. This round also went quite well.

Next, I had the googliness round. It's basically a behavioral round, so they asked me questions like what are my expectations when working at Google, what criteria do I use to prioritize projects, etc. This round was meh because I don't have a lot of work experience so I was only able to give slightly vague answers to questions. But I wasn't too worried because I think it's an experimental round that only happens in some Google offices (London is one of them).

I had my lunch break, ate light.

The third round was the hardest. It was a graphic question about permutation rings. It took me a bit of time to find the solution and I wasn't really sure about it. But the interviewer said my test was fine, so I coded it. I had 1-2 trivial errors that I fixed after the interviewer pointed them out. I think this was my strongest round as tough questions can go a long way in distinguishing algorithmic ability and my competitive programming background helped a lot here.

The fourth round was based on trees and basic probability. It was easy-medium and I was able to code without any errors so this round went well too.

After the new year I got a call from my recruiter saying that my interview scores were good enough to move on to the host search phase. In this phase, my recruiter basically tried to find a team on Google for me. I was paired with the Google Cloud team in Warsaw and got my offer in April.

As you can see, most of my rounds were based on data structures and algorithms, so my experience in programming competition helped a lot in clearing these rounds.

I recommend that you start entering coding contests right away. To get started, look at some of my answers:

Sameer Gulati's answer to How should I get started in competitive programming?

Sameer Gulati's answer to What made you good at competitive programming?

About 2-3 months before the interview, switch to troubleshooting at Leetcode, CareerCup, etc. to gain experience in solving interview problems. Having a little experience in competitive programming will make solving these problems much easier for you.

Although many Google employees and people may say that getting a job at Google is the same as getting a job at any other company, I feel that it is different and difficult. The recruitment rate versus the applicants rate is very low compared to most companies. At least in Google Hyderabad it is like that.

To join Google off campus, you must have a thorough understanding of the skills required for that position. While many companies agree to hire an employee if they meet most but one or two of the requirements, Google is not compromising.

If you apply through the Google jobs page, the probability that you will receive a call is low. A very sticky thing

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Although many Google employees and people may say that getting a job at Google is the same as getting a job at any other company, I feel that it is different and difficult. The recruitment rate versus the applicants rate is very low compared to most companies. At least in Google Hyderabad it is like that.

To join Google off campus, you must have a thorough understanding of the skills required for that position. While many companies agree to hire an employee if they meet most but one or two of the requirements, Google is not compromising.

If you apply through the Google jobs page, the probability that you will receive a call is low. Google relies heavily on employee recommendation. So find a friend or person who is willing to recommend you. Now, one should not be confused between a Google employee and an outside employee who works for Google. This third-party role is common in the non-technical field, so when approaching a non-technical Google worker for reference, make sure they are direct Google employees. (No offense to third party employees, but Google HR hardly considers the reference to be an employee reference)

Another thing is that in case you have a good current job profile, update on LinkedIn with the projects and all the details and follow the Google page. In this case, if you apply for a job, your data is already at their disposal so that they decide to go further or not. I know few people who work at Google who didn't even apply, but HR based on their LinkedIn profile approached them.

Also choose the job you want to apply for. Do not mindlessly apply to all openings.

Once you have received a call, you will have a telephone interview. This is a basic interview to understand you and whether you will fit the position or not.

Unlike other companies, Google's hiring process does not end in a few days. It takes a month or two. Google conducts 6 to 9 rounds of interviews on different dates. Each round is knockout and grades are also assigned based on performance so that in the end the decision is clear.

In most roles, the employee who is working in that role will test your knowledge. He is then followed by the duties supervisor, who will assess whether he will fit into the team and whether he has original ideas for getting the job done.

And they will be the final HR interview. Google not only looks for someone who fits the role, but it looks for the one who is better than the role.

There are also several blogs that help you understand the Google interview process. Check Glassdoor to see someone who has posted a review for the same position you want to apply for. That will give you a better understanding as the processed interview differs depending on the fields and roles.

In case you can't get a call for the position, you can join the third-party Google role (genpact and several are there), then work hard and apply for the internal transfer. from a third party vendor, but I understand why I am emphasizing "verrryyyy few". (this is very long term and personally I would not recommend anyone to do so)

PS: The above lines are based on information received from friends who work at Google or colleagues who have previously worked or requested Google. I have personally never applied for Google until now so if someone says I am wrong it possibly could be.

Anyway I wish you all the luck to break up the Google interview and join the Google train. :)

hmm ... I also wish I had the opportunity to work for Google or Facebook ...: D

Google software engineers develop next-generation technologies that change the way millions of users connect, explore, and interact with and with information. His ambitions go far beyond searching. Your products need to handle information at the scale of the web. They are seeking ideas from all areas of computing, including information retrieval, artificial intelligence, natural language processing, distributed computing, large-scale system design, networking, security, data compression, a

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hmm ... I also wish I had the opportunity to work for Google or Facebook ...: D

Google software engineers develop next-generation technologies that change the way millions of users connect, explore, and interact with and with information. His ambitions go far beyond searching. Your products need to handle information at the scale of the web. They seek ideas from all areas of computing, including information retrieval, artificial intelligence, natural language processing, distributed computing, large-scale system design, networking, security, data compression, and User interface desing; the list goes on and grows every day. As a software engineer, you work in a small team and can change teams and projects as our business grows and evolves.

With his technical expertise, he manages the priorities, deadlines and deliverables of individual projects. You design, develop, test, implement, maintain and improve software solutions.

Responsibilities:
Provide technical and architectural leadership for one or more software engineering teams.
Architect, design and development (practical) of large-scale complex infrastructure systems.
Use your technical influence to drive innovation and engineering standards / best practices across engineering.


Minimum qualifications:
Bachelor's / Bachelor's degree in Computer Science or related technical field or equivalent practical experience.
4 years of relevant work experience, including large systems software design and development, with knowledge of UNIX / Linux and programming experience in C, C ++ and / or Java.
Programming experience in C ++ and / or Java.

Preferred Qualifications:
Bachelor of Science in Computer Science or equivalent practical experience.
4 years of relevant work experience, including programming experience in C, C ++ and / or Java.
A solid foundation in computer science, with strong competencies in data structures, algorithms, and software design.

Area:
The web is what you make of it, and the Chrome & Apps team is helping the world make more of the web. From open source professionals to user experience extraordinary, the team develops products like Chrome OS, Gmail, and Google Docs that help users connect, communicate, and collaborate with others. Its consumer products and enterprise platforms are giving millions of users in homes, businesses, universities and nonprofits around the world the tools that shape their web experience, and are changing the way they think about computing. ... In fact, it's something to brag about If you work for Google ...: D
Secret to getting a job at Google revealed
How we hire: Careers
professionals at Google Want to work for Google? Answer these five questions Above
are some links to amazing sites that will surely help you ...
Check them out ...
Hope this helped you ... All the best ^ _ ^

Google or Microsoft: a dream for many.

Terms and Conditions :-

I'm not at Google or Microsoft or have experience with them, but I don't know how I want to answer this question so badly. If you want something from a Google or Microsoft employee, please don't read my answer. Because I'm not going to talk about how they recruit, how many rounds, blah blah blah.

I am currently in my third year at B.tech, pursuing my bachelor's degree in computer engineering from the National Institute of Calicut.

I don't know when this question was first asked, but considering it's in the first place

Keep reading

Google or Microsoft: a dream for many.

Terms and Conditions :-

I'm not at Google or Microsoft or have experience with them, but I don't know how I want to answer this question so badly. If you want something from a Google or Microsoft employee, please don't read my answer. Because I'm not going to talk about how they recruit, how many rounds, blah blah blah.

I am currently in my third year at B.tech, pursuing my bachelor's degree in computer engineering from the National Institute of Calicut.

I don't know when this question was first asked, but considering that you are in the freshman year of your university (if you are not, at least someone who is enrolled will benefit from this).

This is something from my heart, and not from some wikipedia. so don't worry too much about typos.

Let us begin :-

Google or Microsoft: a dream for many.

On-campus placements: -

Not just at Google or Microsoft, getting into a company is a breeze if you are selected through campus locations. But Google or Microsoft will not direct or select Indian students from each and every engineering college. They will not come to any small or less reputable university (let's be frank). They will only take from the IITs and may be some of the best NITs. Even if you belong to those universities, you should be the best in your class. So let's remove this option.

Off campus: -

How to attract them: -

So this is the only option for you, me, or many other engineering students.

Google or Microsoft receive thousands of resumes daily. Who should they choose? Consider if you are the person sitting in the Google office and you have to sort the resumes, what would you do? Would you study the entire resumes of hundreds of thousands of people on a daily basis? Nerd! definitely not !! you will do some sort of classification on those resumes. Who would you prefer?

CGPA: -

1.) CGPA. They will definitely review your CGPA. If you have a good CGPA, they will most likely consider your resume and call you for interviews.

2.) But what if you don't have a good CGPA? Due to many factors, many engineering students fail to obtain a good CGPA. This cannot be undone. You can't go back to school, the full four years and get a high level of cgpa.

PROJECTS: -

1.) So this is the next thing on your resume that would attract readers. Do good projects. It is easy to say, but difficult to achieve. You can meet your seniors, or someone who works in major companies and start doing or at least thinking of some project from your second year. Don't be late and don't hesitate to ask. If you have good connections with your teachers, get some suggestions from them. Good projects, in my opinion, are something different. You have to do something different from what you have studied. This shows them that you have a good command of the theory and that you have the skills to apply that theory.

2.) When you have some good projects on your resume, there is a greater chance than having a good cgpa to consider your resume.

PRACTICES: -

Why should you do an internship?

1.) This is because many companies find training beginners a waste of valuable time. they expect employees to work for the company from day one.

2.) So when you do an internship in a field that interests you, you will get some experience in that field.

3.) When the person sees your resume. he thinks he already has some experience in this field and considering it would be a better option.

What would you do if you were in that position to select resume, would you do the same right?

GOOGLE CODE SUMMER: -

The program invites students who meet their eligibility criteria to post at most 5 applications that detail the software-coding project they wish to work on. These applications are then evaluated by the corresponding mentoring organization. Every participating organization must provide mentors for each of the project ideas received, if the organization is of the opinion that the project would benefit from them. The mentorsthen rank the applications and decide among themselves which proposals to accept. Google then decides how many projects each organization gets taking into account the number of applications the organization has received, and asks the organizations to mark at most that many projects accordingly.

If you have a certificate from this, you would require no other eligibility to get into any company.

Study about that from wikipedia.

How to perform well at interviews once your resume is shortlisted :-

Big companies provide you huge salaries. That means they expect a lot from you. So just with your college knowledge you cannot get into such companies. You need to work hard separately to get into such companies.

You need to do a lot of coding mainly.

Coding, Coding, Coding.

You need not learn all the computer languages. Just C. But you need to be a master at that. You can learn additionally one or two languages.

How to become an expert in coding :-

Right from your second year, start participating in coding competitions.(online).

Codechef, HackerRank, HackerEarth etc.

Initially you cannot solve, but as the days go by you can solve them easily.

Should have a good command in core subjects :-

1.) Data structures and algorithms

2.) Operating systems

3.) Database management systems

4.) Redes de computadoras

5.) Compiladores

6.) Diseño de lógica digital, etc.

Además, obtener una buena puntuación en la puerta te ayudará a aterrizar en una de las grandes empresas.

Y nunca te deprimas una vez que te rechacen, inténtalo de nuevo.

Todo lo mejor.

Para empezar, querrá graduarse de un IIT y querrá asegurarse de cumplir con los criterios de selección, donde CGPA juega un papel importante.

Sin embargo, si no proviene de un IIT, aún puede unirse a Google India. Solo tendrá que asegurarse de cumplir con las calificaciones mínimas del puesto de trabajo que está buscando.

Suponiendo que desea conseguir un trabajo como ingeniero de software, estos son los siguientes:

# 1 CALIFICACIONES MÍNIMAS (GOOGLE INDIA, POSICIÓN SWE)

  • Licenciatura en Ciencias de la Computación, Ingeniería Eléctrica o Informática, o experiencia práctica equivalente
  • 5 years of relevant work experience
  • P
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For starters, you'll want to graduate from an IIT, and you'll want to make sure you meet the selection criteria, where CGPA plays an important role.

However, if you are not coming from an IIT, you can still join Google India. You just have to make sure you meet the minimum qualifications for the job you are looking for.

Assuming you want to land a job as a software engineer, these are as follows:

# 1 MINIMUM RATINGS (GOOGLE INDIA, SWE POSITION)

  • Bachelor's degree in Computer Science, Electrical or Computer Engineering, or equivalent practical experience
  • 5 years of relevant work experience
  • Programming experience in one or more of the following languages: C, C ++, Java and / or Python

# 2 PREFERRED RATINGS (GOOGLE INDIA, SWE POSITION)

  • Computer science background, with competencies in data structures, algorithms, or API design
  • Experience automation and scaling of mobile or web backends
  • Experience with the development of full-stack or back-end applications
  • Knowledge of mobile application development on Android and detection technologies.
  • Ability to learn other coding languages ​​as needed

Once you have the minimum qualifications under your belt, you should be able to apply for the position without a hitch.

# 3 FORMAS DE SOLICITAR UN PUESTO EN SWE EN GOOGLE INDIA

After making sure you have the minimum qualifications for the job (and hopefully some of the preferred qualifications as well), you’ll want to send your application to Google India along with your resume and wait for it to be reviewed. There are three main methods that I can think of to apply for an SWE position at Google India:

  • Employee referral: This method involves having an employee from Google India refer your application and therefore making it stand out from all other applications that Google India receives each day. The best-case scenario here would be to have a friend who works as a software engineer at Google India do this for you, but you don’t necessarily need to know the person beforehand and you can find Google India employees willing to refer you through Facebook and LinkedIn.
  • Online application: This is the most common method of application as far as Google India is concerned: it involves heading to the Google Jobs portal, filling in the application details, and sending it alongside your resume. It’s the easiest way to apply for an SWE position, but it’s also unlikely to lead you to the interviewing process on its own due to how competitive the environment is. If you want to use this method, make sure you have a great resume that highlights any relevant work experience (or side projects if you’ve taken part in any).
  • Mailing Google India’s HR: This method involves finding Google India’s HR e-mail address (often through an ex-Google India employee) and contacting them directly. This method is the least likely to lead you to success, but if done correctly, it could lead you to the interviewing process with a huge advantage to show for it.

After your application’s been successfully reviewed and accepted, the interviewing process will begin.

You’ll need to study a few key topics to ensure you have an excellent performance. Those topics would be data structures & algorithms, systems design, and soft skills like communication and teamwork skills.

#4 DATA STRUCTURES & ALGORITHMS

This topic is often prioritized by other candidates because it’s essential to answer the programming questions you’ll be seeing. Among the most important concepts, you should study dynamic programming, shortest path algorithms, search algorithms, sorting algorithms, BFS, DFS, and arrays just to name a few.

Thankfully, there’s a ton of resources that you can use to study this topic. For example, you could enroll in a course like Tech Interview Pro, an interview prep course designed by a former Google SWE that has two in-depth modules on DS&A, and then you could use the programming questions from a site like HackerRank to practice what you’ve learned so far.

#5 SYSTEMS DESIGN

Doing well in design-related questions is also important because Google India is interested in a candidate’s ability to design scalable systems as a web-based company. Important topics to study here would be database sharding, load balancing, CDNs, redundancy and replication, and caching just to mention a few.

Like DS&A, there are plenty of ways you can approach the topic. For example, you could read a book like Designing Data-Intensive Applications, which is like the CLRS of systems design, and then you could use Cracking The Coding Interview to find design-related questions to solve with what you’ve learned from the book.

#6 SOFT SKILLS

This aspect is often ignored by other candidates because they don’t see how non-technical skills could have anything to do with a technical interview, but it’s crucial that you can efficiently communicate with your interviewer and that you’re capable of displaying Googliness.

Thankfully, this is the easiest topic to prepare for. To study this topic and everything you’ve learned so far simultaneously, you could use a website like Interviewing.io to engage in mock interviews with other software engineers (some of whom have worked in Google and Facebook before) while you receive immediate, objective feedback on your performance.

Best of luck with your interviews.

As someone who works at Microsoft, probably a more authoritative answer, you can judge for yourself later :)

  1. Have skills relevant to the jobs posted/ roles that people are being hired for.
  2. If you don't have the skills, but are looking to develop them, use LeetCode to get that level of understanding.
  3. Connect with people employed at Microsoft / Google, whether it's at job fairs, user group events, or publicly organized hackathons. Having an employee submit their resume to a recruiter for review / put into the hiring loop works much better than applying blindly to jobs posted online.
  4. If applicable
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As someone working at Microsoft, probably a more authoritative answer, you can judge for yourself later :)

  1. Have relevant skills for the posted jobs / roles people are being hired for.
  2. If you don't have the skills, but are looking to develop them, use LeetCode to get that level of understanding.
  3. Connect with people employed at Microsoft / Google, whether it's at job fairs, user group events, or publicly organized hackathons. Having an employee submit their resume to a recruiter for review / put into the hiring loop works much better than applying blindly to jobs posted online.
  4. If you are applying for a specific role, make sure you read the job description carefully before you apply, and make sure you actually have skills that are relevant to the role - As someone who does candidate screening and interviews for my team, it’s painful to have to go through 200+ applications to find out only 20–30 are actually relevant profiles, which will further get reduced in number during the screening interviews. Example- If you have skills as a computer technician for 15+ years, but no skills as a Program / Product Manager, there’s no way you’re going to get cleared for a screening/ loop. Make sure you read the skills needed for the advertised job before applying, this will actually save you loads of disappointment when you don’t hear back, because you had no skills that were a really required for the job.
  5. Get active in User Groups/ College groups hosted by these companies to understand the tech stack they use, and then build on those skills.

There’s no sure shot way to success, but if you’re good at what you do and have relevant marketable skills, you will definitely succeed.

Best of Luck!

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