How do I decline a job offer to stay with a current employer?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Jake Lee



How do I decline a job offer to stay with a current employer?

It depends on the reason for your decision. If you simply tell them that you decided to stay with your current employer, they will feel like you've wasted your time. If there is something at work that you did not like, you can send it delicately. Equally if it were compensation.

It's better to focus your reason on something you learned or happened during the interview process rather than something you might have discovered before the interview.

If you let me know what the reason is, I can help you with the wording.

The best way to do this is to include the following three key points in your conversation:

  1. A funny thank you
  2. A well thought out justification
  3. Forward moment

Thank you The
first thing to start with when you decline a job offer is a sincere thank you to the person who extended the offer. Be sure to communicate that you appreciate the offer and state that you respect both the organization and the other person; do not make it appear that the position was below you or that you did not give the offer serious consideration and consideration. .
Rationale
Here is your rationale for

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The best way to do this is to include the following three key points in your conversation:

  1. A funny thank you
  2. A well thought out justification
  3. Forward moment

Thank you The
first thing to start with when you decline a job offer is a sincere thank you to the person who extended the offer. Be sure to communicate that you appreciate the offer and state that you respect both the organization and the other person; do not make it appear that the position was below you or that you did not give the offer serious consideration and consideration. .
Fundamental reason
Then comes your rationale for turning down the job. This is the most difficult aspect of the conversation, but also the most important. There are countless reasons why a job won't fit perfectly and many of them are perfectly plausible and valid. Others may be harder to justify or express (it's hard to refuse because the hiring manager is an idiot or because you can't bear to leave the West Coast).
Even if your rationale deviates from politically correct or socially acceptable, 99% of the time you can communicate even the most sensitive reasons in a tactful and professional manner. Here's some helpful language on five common reasons you might decline an offer:

  • External factors: geography, family, time. It is always easier to blame a decision on someone or something else: If issues beyond your control prevent you from accepting a position, be honest: "Unfortunately, I cannot make the change due to family obligations." Or, "As much as I am interested in the position, I have decided that this is not the right time to uproot my family and move to the other side of the country."
  • Money - It's absolutely okay to turn down a position that doesn't pay well (enough). You are allowed to say, "I wish I could make it work, however I need to have a higher level of compensation. I'm sure you will understand."
  • Lack of Skills / Qualifications: If you don't have the necessary skills to get the ball out of the park or if you suspect that you are being set to fail, then the best way to retire is to say this: "After much consideration, I have decided that I cannot overcome expectations realistically and that I would never want to join an organization where I can't deliver on promises and deliveries. "
  • People Problems: You can't tell someone that they or your colleagues don't like you, but you can use "cultural adjustment" as a starting point when your personality doesn't match a team or organization. For example, "I respect the work that all of you do, but I don't think it is right for me personally. I will keep looking for something more relaxed / more entrepreneurial / with a flatter organizational structure, etc..
  • Dead End: If a job is attractive today but won't get you in the right direction toward your ultimate career goals, you have the right to say so. People will generally respect your long-term career goals. "As much as I'd love to join the team, I really need to get some fundraising experience so I can transition to a development role in the next few years. Truth be told, the program director position isn't going to do that. for me."

Moving Forward
Once you've given a serious reason why you turned down the position, thank your counterpart again and offer to stay in touch or wish them luck with the hiring process. You may acknowledge that you would like to be aware of new opportunities or review the situation if your external factors change. It's not crazy to think that the employer who fires today may be attracting you in the future, so keep the relationship positive and the door open.

Depends on the situation.

There are people who will tell you that it is unethical.
There are people who will tell you to do what is best for you.

The truth lies somewhere in between.

Look, the basic facts of life are these.

We live and work in a capitalist society.
Workers are commodities, particularly in STEM roles, but now pretty much everywhere.
Accepting a role and withdrawing after accepting is totally acceptable. It's all how you approach the discussion.

If, after considering the role, you decide that you have changed your mind, it is best to make that decision now during acceptance.

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Depends on the situation.

There are people who will tell you that it is unethical.
There are people who will tell you to do what is best for you.

The truth lies somewhere in between.

Look, the basic facts of life are these.

We live and work in a capitalist society.
Workers are commodities, particularly in STEM roles, but now pretty much everywhere.
Accepting a role and withdrawing after accepting is totally acceptable. It's all how you approach the discussion.

If, after considering the position, you decide that you have changed your mind, it is better to make that decision now during the acceptance phase than after you have left your current job and started your new one.

Most of us are very busy. We don't usually take the time to consider what it really means to take the job. Often times, this understanding does not occur until you are about to give your notice at your current job, or prepare to be mentally and physically ready to begin a new role.

If you are in ANY doubt as to whether this is the correct position, the answer should be NO. Never enter a new role with reservations or feeling that you need to continue in the new role JUST because you have accepted it. That's not a good sign. You should NEVER commit to something as important as blame-based or "compensation" employment.

There are many legitimate reasons to retire after accepting a new position.

  1. New to the area and unfamiliar with the location and the company.
  2. Excessive travel commitments, including "super commute" (3-4 hours a day).
  3. Contract roles vs. permanent. Nobody really wants to be a contingent member of staff.
  4. Inadequate benefits.
  5. Limited time off or no pay.
  6. Joining a 'project' vs. joining a team and / or a company.
  7. Great pressure from recruiters and account executives working on commission. If they don't close a sale by hiring you, they don't make money.
  8. Limited / no opportunity to advance.
  9. Money (and this is usually at the top of the list, but not the most important consideration after a certain level).
  10. Ability to be in control of your own destiny.
  11. Responsibility to the family for the presence, stability and enough energy to be available and not be brain dead from work or the stress of travel.
  12. The ability to live a life outside of work.

I recently accepted an offer and canceled my acceptance. An outside recruiter put a LOT of pressure on me to make a decision before finishing the interviews and final offers. I was asked to make a decision before I could properly evaluate the opportunities. This is, of course, exactly what they were hoping for with an aggressive push to 'close' my candidacy.

So I made a bad initial decision when accepting the offer. After several offers came in, I had to evaluate them against each other on their own merits. I realized that I had made a big mistake with my engagement. I withdrew my application after 2 days of acceptance. At the same time, the company I agreed to work for made an aggressive effort to get me started the same week, even after I told them I already had a job that I hadn't announced yet. This was a red flag and my radar was active and it made me see this situation from a different perspective. In hindsight, it is clear that this was a tactic for me to start immediately so that there were no other offers up for grabs. Pushy sales tactics often produce highly unpredictable results.

As I sat down to prepare to give notice to my current employer, and to begin to be mentally and logistically ready to take on the new role, I realized that I would be signing up for a 4+ hour commute every day. He was new to the area and didn't understand the time commitment involved in commuting to and from work.

In hindsight, both the recruiter and the account executives knew what I was committing to in terms of travel. They also knew that this was not a viable work trip. No one in their right mind would sign up for that unless they had no other alternatives. They pushed to 'close' the sale because that is the business they are in.

I realized that there was no possible way I could endure that kind of trip. The next morning, I sent an email and explained that I could not accept the position and that I would be retiring.

The setback of the account executive was initially very strong. When I agreed to speak to her on the phone, things calmed down. I explained to him that an aggressive "closure" of my candidacy really was a disservice to all interested parties. If he took on the role, he would end up quitting shortly after. No one could handle that kind of commute. It was a Lose / Lose situation. I would lose my current job, I would lose my new job, and I would be unemployed. The client employer would lose the resource they desperately wanted, and the recruiter and account executive would lose the revenue. In all likelihood I would end up burning several bridges, including my own, in the process.

We agreed to let the acceptance fail. They weren't happy, but it's my choice.

Sometimes there are circumstances beyond the control of the candidate that result in the rejection of an accepted offer.

Pushy sales and closing tactics from AE's and recruiters can produce highly unpredictable results. For them, they just want to put an approved body in a chair so they can collect commissions and waste.

Good recruiters, account executives, and hiring managers know that it's not just about the sale. They will give you the time you need to make the best decision for your own needs and circumstances. If you don't accept the offer, they usually agree to that too. People come and go from companies every day. It is a great risk to force someone to take on a role that they are not comfortable with, for whatever reason. Good managers know that a single bad hire can ruin a team.

It is up to each person to assess their own needs and tolerance for risk. Rejecting an acceptance is totally fine. It is your life, your family, your money that depends on this decision. Honor has nothing to do with it. You cannot eat cheap nobility.

Is salary the only reason you are turning it down, or is there some other reason the offer has soured (I mean, if you are getting an offer, it stands to reason that you made the effort to apply and interview, so he must have been interested at some point).

If money is the only reason, you don't have to turn down the job outright. Simply respond to say, "Thanks for the offer, but I'm afraid I really can't take the position for a salary of less than $ X," where "$ X" is your absolute minimum acceptable wage.

This is not going to be a negotiation where you come and go a lot,

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Is salary the only reason you are turning it down, or is there some other reason the offer has soured (I mean, if you are getting an offer, it stands to reason that you made the effort to apply and interview, so he must have been interested at some point).

If money is the only reason, you don't have to turn down the job outright. Simply respond to say, "Thanks for the offer, but I'm afraid I really can't take the position for a salary of less than $ X," where "$ X" is your absolute minimum acceptable wage.

This will not be a negotiation where you come and go a lot, that does not benefit either of you. The person making the offer has their hands tied as to what they can offer or made you a low offer. And that's great, you can't blame them for that, because they have to do what's best for them in the long run.

And you don't want to try and give them an impromptu number in the hopes of coming and going a few times and getting the salary you want. They probably don't need it as much, so if you tell them what your lowest acceptable number is, they:

  • Accept that figure, or
  • Accept their counter offer as if you politely declined their initial offer.

It will almost certainly be the only offer and counter offer that will take place in the vast majority of salary negotiations. One of you entered the interview process with a very different understanding of the salary being offered / demanded, and there is really only one significant exchange after that. If they come back with a new offer that is still low for you, you will leave. If they give you a higher offer and you decide to fight back, they are much more likely to leave because every day they waste negotiating with you is another unproductive day where the job they are hiring for is not getting done, so they are losing. . money. And if they make a new offer and you counter with something that is clearly reducing them, they will leave too.

So that's the point that you give your lowest acceptable claim: no one wants to waste your time, least of all you. If they are unwilling to comply with your demand, he walks away. At the same time, letting them know very clearly what the lowest salary you can accept is lets them know that you are serious and that you know how much your time is worth to you (you may not know how much it is objectively worth in the job market, but that too help: if you want a CEO salary for a post in the mailroom they know there is too great a disparity to overcome. But if they tried to offer you an associate level salary for what you clearly understand as an intern, or senior position They can see that you are not desperate or an idiot if you stand your ground and insist on a realistic salary demand.

First, decide if you really want the job.

Yes, the salary is too low, but if you wouldn't mind doing the job at a significantly higher rate, you may want to think about what that rate is and give it to you. You may be missing out on an opportunity that is worthy of your skills at a living wage. Employers often don't know what a "good" wage rate is and just throw in numbers to see what happens. However, if you really are someone they loved, they will likely go back to HR and the right people to get approval that matches your desired pay rate (as high as possible).

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First, decide if you really want the job.

Yes, the salary is too low, but if you wouldn't mind doing the job at a significantly higher rate, you may want to think about what that rate is and give it to you. You may be missing out on an opportunity that is worthy of your skills at a living wage. Employers often don't know what a "good" wage rate is and just throw in numbers to see what happens. However, if you really are someone they loved, they will probably go back to HR and the right people to get approval that matches their desired salary rate (no matter how high it is).

Hiring people is often about solving a problem and if investing more money in a problem solves it, companies will often consider it more than suffering losses in business if they don't fix the problem.

Email example:

<name of recruiter or hiring manager>,

I appreciate the offer, but it would be too low and not worth it for me. Could you increase the salary to $ X?

Sincerely,

<your name>

This message is short and if you want to know why you would like that salary, you should have that conversation via email. Even at this point, you don't need to share your current salary. What matters is how much you want to be hired. You're basically in negotiation mode now, so wait for a counter offer or to be accepted. You can easily say something like, "I would not accept anything less than $ X" just to be firm on your salary.

If you just don't want the job even though the salary is higher ...

<name of recruiter or hiring manager>,

I appreciate the offer, but I have decided to look for other opportunities that I am working on.

Sincerely,

<your name>

Again, keep it brief and this usually ends the conversation.

The first is the first; The company whose offer you are rejecting is going to be very pissed off. So be prepared for a not so pleasant conversation / interaction.

Do the following:

Call immediately: Without wasting time, call your company's HR representative immediately and inform them of the decision. Time is of the essence here for the company whose offer you are rejecting. The longer it takes, the more difficulties the company will have.

Reason: Be as open and honest as possible about why you declined the offer, as you have done in the details accompanying the question. you

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The first is the first; The company whose offer you are rejecting is going to be very pissed off. So be prepared for a not so pleasant conversation / interaction.

Do the following:

Call immediately: Without wasting time, call your company's HR representative immediately and inform them of the decision. Time is of the essence here for the company whose offer you are rejecting. The longer it takes, the more difficulties the company will have.

Reason: Be as open and honest as possible about why you declined the offer, as you have done in the details accompanying the question. You do not need to reveal the name of the company you decided to join, however, be honest and upfront about why. Honesty is always appreciated.

Excuse me: The HR representative you will be speaking to will be dejected, frustrated, and possibly even furious when you announce your decision. Apologize for having to decline the offer. Please understand that you are putting the company in a lot of trouble by declining the offer. Empathize with the person on the other side and tell them it was not an easy decision and offer a sincere and genuine apology.

Email: Write an email to everyone who participated in the recruitment process explaining your decision with the utmost frankness and honesty, just as you did during the call.

Acknowledgment: Thank the company and your management for the opportunity provided and for considering your candidacy for the position. Connect on professional networks like LinkedIn with the people you have interacted with during the hiring process.

I hope this helps.

I appreciate your keen thought on this. From an unbiased point of view, I see that this is not unethical. There are multiple times when the current employer gives a counter offer and you choose to stay behind.

However, from a hiring standpoint, you may have previously evaluated your options within the current company and the need to switch / search has been avoided, which is sometimes not possible.

However, you can still reevaluate Amazon as an option and try talking to the recruiting team and hiring manager to understand if there are opportunities within Amazon that you can act on.

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I appreciate your keen thought on this. From an unbiased point of view, I see that this is not unethical. There are multiple times when the current employer gives a counter offer and you choose to stay behind.

However, from a hiring standpoint, you may have previously evaluated your options within the current company and the need to switch / search has been avoided, which is sometimes not possible.

However, you can still reevaluate Amazon as an option and try talking to the recruiting team and hiring manager to understand if there are opportunities within Amazon where you can really leverage your skills to solve bigger and more challenging problems. Amazon may have solved the design services framework issue, but there may be some areas where you can still make a difference.

To answer this: "I interact with the CEO / CTO every day here and in this area I am not very sure about Amazon." - I can say that given the size and nature of Amazon's organizational hierarchy, I may not always work directly with the CTO / CEO, but the amount of transparency in Amazon Culture and the typically flat organizational structure, one gets enough visibility and options for standing. Communicate and communicate with top-level executives.

That said, in this dynamic market it is more than common to have multiple forces trying to attract talent to them. You have to make your own good choice and live with it!

Generally speaking, it will depend on the offer made to you and the reasons why you declined it. It can also be a question of how you rejected them. For example, he did it in a way that was not very nice or professional. Here, they will definitely never want to consider you because you weren't nice. Therefore, they may never give you that second chance.

If they feel that you were too greedy, they may not want to consider you in the future because they don't want to go through it again. So they could feel they did, what they felt was more than fair, and you still wanted more, spinning

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Generally speaking, it will depend on the offer made to you and the reasons why you declined it. It can also be a question of how you rejected them. For example, he did it in a way that was not very nice or professional. Here, they will definitely never want to consider you because you weren't nice. Therefore, they may never give you that second chance.

If they feel that you were too greedy, they may not want to consider you in the future because they don't want to go through it again. So they could feel that they did, that what they felt was more than fair, and you still wanted more, turning them off in the process.

But if you are nice about it and they see the reasons as perfectly legitimate and understandable, then most would consider you for future employment. So no, just because you turned down your job offer, it doesn't automatically mean that you will never be considered for a job again. It all depends on the details and how you rejected your offer!

First, make sure the well is not poisoned with the current employer. Rest assured, there is no return on a new offer.

Check where your loyalties are. If you love the company you are currently running into and feel like there are a lot of leads, you can accept the current offer from employers. Only you know if this is right for you.

As for the new quasi-employer, this is difficult. If you are sure you want to stay with your current company, be honest and straightforward. "They adjusted my compensation to be competitive and I (you) am loyal to your current employer." Thank you then for your time and excuse me for the wa

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First, make sure the well is not poisoned with the current employer. Rest assured, there is no return on a new offer.

Check where your loyalties are. If you love the company you are currently running into and feel like there are a lot of leads, you can accept the current offer from employers. Only you know if this is right for you.

As for the new quasi-employer, this is difficult. If you are sure you want to stay with your current company, be honest and straightforward. "They adjusted my compensation to be competitive and I (you) am loyal to your current employer." Thank you then for your time and sorry for the wasted time.

This may not be the case for you, but it is rarely just about money. Just check the reason you wanted to leave and make sure this is the right call for you.

Good luck.

He would usually say something like "I really appreciate the opportunity to work with this company / you, unfortunately I cannot accept the position at this time." Thank you for your understanding. "If you ask me for a reason, I would say" it is personal ". If you wish, you can add" not related to the position ". I have said this several times and felt very polite and professional. Yes still They pressure you for some reason, you can say, "I don't feel comfortable sharing that," and then be glad you aren't going to work there if they can't get the clue of the first rejection. Good luck!

Be prepared with a list of people who work for lower rates than yours. Politely decline the proposal and say something like, "Thank you for approaching this opportunity. I appreciate the opportunity to meet you, but your rate is much lower than what I normally charge. I can forward a list to you of people who work for less than me. They are not as skilled as I am, but they could play this role. "

What this does is help this person and the writers you refer them to. It puts you at the center of other contacts in the future as someone they will want to react to.

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Be prepared with a list of people who work for lower rates than yours. Politely decline the proposal and say something like, "Thank you for approaching this opportunity. I appreciate the opportunity to meet you, but your rate is much lower than what I normally charge. I can forward a list to you of people who work for less than me. They are not as skilled as I am, but they could play this role. "

What this does is help this person and the writers you refer them to. It puts you at the center of other contacts in the future as someone they will want to communicate with. It does not guarantee that the money will ever be correct. Of this particular client that people change jobs and have a long memory. It is an elegant technique that positions you as the best in your class and others as "good, but less."

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