How do I choose my first job?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Finlay Armstrong



How do I choose my first job?

Considering your details and that you are lucky enough to have a job offer right out of school, I would say accept the offer you have and, while working there, continue to apply for and search for other jobs in the fields and places you prefer. . .

Accepting a job in the industrial sector does not mean that you will be permanently trapped in that type of job. If your aspirations are elsewhere, just don't abandon them.

First, work on the job that you have been offered to earn and save money. See if you like it. Learn some new skills (which will make you more valuable in other workplaces). If you like the job in the end, you can

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Considering your details and that you are lucky enough to have a job offer right out of school, I would say accept the offer you have and, while working there, continue to apply for and search for other jobs in the fields and places you prefer. . .

Accepting a job in the industrial sector does not mean that you will be permanently trapped in that type of job. If your aspirations are elsewhere, just don't abandon them.

First, work on the job that you have been offered to earn and save money. See if you like it. Learn some new skills (which will make you more valuable in other workplaces). If you like the job in the end, you can decide to stay long term.

But if after working there you decide that you would like to work elsewhere, start looking for other jobs. Set aside time each day to apply for the jobs you would like to have. Research your ideal job locations and how much it would cost to live there, and start saving money for that (and moving if these jobs are far away).

Basically, you can take all the time in the world to decide what you would like to do for a living. There is no deadline; Some people spend their entire lives exploring what they are capable of and what they might enjoy for work. In the meantime, though, you should be working, even if it's not your ideal job. Money = food, shelter, and opportunities you can take advantage of. Work = experience, knowledge and more possibilities for your future.

Edit: The answer was written before the details were added. I suggest that the main question be expanded to include words that make it clear that it does not mean first job, it means first job after graduating from college. But I will leave this answer as it is.

I did everything that was available. First babysitting job. Later the same year, an immigrant family moved around the corner and hired me to teach English to their children. Grandma decided that I was a good tutor and attended the lessons. Within two weeks, he was tutoring the whole family. I was 11 years old.

At 13 I started giving private Hebrew classes at the synagogue, because

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Edit: The answer was written before the details were added. I suggest that the main question be expanded to include words that make it clear that it does not mean first job, it means first job after graduating from college. But I will leave this answer as it is.

I did everything that was available. First babysitting job. Later the same year, an immigrant family moved around the corner and hired me to teach English to their children. Grandma decided that I was a good tutor and attended the lessons. Within two weeks, he was tutoring the whole family. I was 11 years old.

At 13 I started giving private Hebrew classes in the synagogue, because I could, they didn't have anyone else, and I convinced the rabbi that they needed a tutor. At 16 he was already running a tutoring program. That summer I took a job as a camp counselor during the week and a job at a donut shop on the weekends. Neighbors owned the donut shop.

At 17 I started working in my father's law office as a receptionist. One day I was at a gas station and I saw a sign painted on the window and I thought, "I could do that, I think it would take me two hours." So I asked the manager how much he had paid for that sign. He said $ 40! This was in the early 1980s, and $ 20 an hour was a lot of money. The next day, I drove to trade school to see if I could join their poster painting class. Turns out they had a waiting list for the previous two years, but the list had gotten old, and when they called everyone on the list, no one was interested yet. I started the poster painting class two weeks later.

I finally went to college and did a higher level job. But my first jobs were simply doing what was available. I also worked at a pizzeria for a while, and for a while in college, I worked for a dentist who specialized in making dentures, and my job was to drive all over Los Angeles and deliver the new teeth to the dentists who had them ordered. for your patients.

When we are young, we take whatever job we can find. The more work experience we have, the easier it will be to get better jobs. My husband is an EPA executive, but as a child he was also a camp counselor, and during college he had many odd jobs, including delivering flowers. Then he got his doctorate. in environmental economics from Stanford University.

Don't worry about choosing your first job. Get your first job. You can be picky later. You first have to build something to be able to write on your resume before you can really choose. Apply for each and every job you know of and think you could probably do. Mow the lawn, serve food, make deliveries, tutor, babysit, clean houses, whatever you can get.

First, get a job.

When I graduated, I took the job they offered me. The job that was available was maternity leave, for 3 months, working the night shift.

He didn't want to have to go home. So that required me to work. I found a job in my field and went to work. I really enjoyed that location. I learned a lot. I get along with everyone. My supervisor and the director liked my attitude and my work. At the end of the temporary placement, I was offered a permanent position. The permanent position was a significant step in which I worked directly with the department head.

If you have a job offer, th

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When I graduated, I took the job they offered me. The job that was available was maternity leave, for 3 months, working the night shift.

He didn't want to have to go home. So that required me to work. I found a job in my field and went to work. I really enjoyed that location. I learned a lot. I get along with everyone. My supervisor and the director liked my attitude and my work. At the end of the temporary placement, I was offered a permanent position. The permanent position was a significant step in which I worked directly with the department head.

If you have a job offer, take whatever job is offered in your field. It's always so much easier to get a job once you have it. And every month that you don't work, your knowledge becomes stale, your skills rust. It is important to put your foot in the door and show your skills.

I think I've always said that the key is to expose yourself to so many different possibilities while in school. Then find one that you think you will enjoy and be good at. The important thing, especially in today's economy, is that what you choose is not a lifetime commitment. If you find that you don't like it or are unsuccessful, you can change the fields.

I will give you a short answer based on life experience. Choose a job or industry that you are passionate about and that makes you feel good. Then it will never be a "job" but rather a labor of love and a place where you will find enjoyment. You have 24 hours a day, 8 of which you have no control over (sleep) and the other 16 should be spent on the greatest happiness you can find.

My first job was bringing urine and stool samples from elderly and disabled patients to the doctor's office ... yes, I mean it. Although most of us who read this probably didn't believe it at first, I bet most of us are also healthy enough to go to the doctor's office to take a urine sample. However, there are many people (I would say that 99% of the patients I encountered were over 80 years old; one couple was almost 100 years old) who simply cannot go to the doctor's office to deliver a sample. And the saddest part? Usually these people are alone, with no family m

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My first job was bringing urine and stool samples from elderly and disabled patients to the doctor's office ... yes, I mean it. Although most of us who read this probably didn't believe it at first, I bet most of us are also healthy enough to go to the doctor's office to take a urine sample. However, there are many people (I would say that 99% of the patients I encountered were over 80 years old; one couple was almost 100 years old) who simply cannot go to the doctor's office to deliver a sample. And the saddest part? These people are usually alone, without family members to help them (otherwise their children or grandchildren would have brought them to the clinic).

I remember one more patient, who was about 90 years old according to the date of birth in her registry. I got to his house around sunset. The door of his house was open and he could hear the television on in his house. Ring the bell. There was no response from inside the house. I rang the bell again. Once again, there was no response. At this point, I freaked out; I thought there was a possibility that my patient had already moved on (remember, this lady is over 90 years old). I got her pregnant. No response. I gently called. No response. Finally, I almost had to yell, “ARGUE! I'm here for your sample! "Only then did I finally hear something.

It seemed like the old woman had fallen asleep while watching TV (thankfully). "Just a minute!" From the door, I could see his shadow rise from the sofa. He moved slowly to where (I guess) the refrigerator was. During this time, I heard a lot of banging and banging. I asked him if he needed help, but he said he was fine. Finally he gave me his urine sample; The whole process took about 15 minutes.

When I left, I couldn't help but wonder why this kind old woman, who clearly couldn't take care of herself, lived alone. Where were your children? Grandchildren? I assumed her husband had already left. It's been about 7 years since then ... I wonder how it will be. Is she still around?

Although it was not what I considered a pleasant job, I learned a lot about myself and life during this job. Many of the elderly patients I had visited were some of the kindest but also loneliest people I have ever met. Many of them had that pitying look on their faces when they saw me, as if a young man like me shouldn't be wasting his youth doing this job.

To this day, I have a soft spot for the elderly; It may not always be obvious to other people, but I secretly and silently judge others based on how they treat the elderly.

Interviews are not as scary as you think. I have conducted more than 3000 interviews throughout my career. I'm about 10,000 hours conducting interviews. Given my experience, I still get nervous and many times there are awkward moments.

With all of my interview experience, I had to conduct an interview with my VP supervisor present and on the panel. His presence knocked me out of my rhythm. I later told her that and she was very apologetic. That was not his intention. He was surprised that I felt that way.

These are the things I had to do to master an interview:

  1. To be prepared. Spend 2-3 hours learning ev
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Interviews are not as scary as you think. I have conducted more than 3000 interviews throughout my career. I'm about 10,000 hours conducting interviews. Given my experience, I still get nervous and many times there are awkward moments.

With all of my interview experience, I had to conduct an interview with my VP supervisor present and on the panel. His presence knocked me out of my rhythm. I later told her that and she was very apologetic. That was not his intention. He was surprised that I felt that way.

These are the things I had to do to master an interview:

  1. To be prepared. Spend 2-3 hours learning all you can online about the company you are interviewing with.
  2. It doesn't matter if you are interviewing with a fast food chain or a bank. Know its history. Memorize your company's mission statement.
  3. It doesn't matter that you're an introvert. As an introvert, you have the extra special ability to focus better than we extroverts. That could be a lie, I don't know. Take advantage of your introvert skills to your advantage. Go ahead and investigate.
  4. Videotape doing interviews. Have a direct friend who won't tell you how you're doing. Do not let your mother do it because she will be tired and will think that you are very special, which in an interview you are not. Sorry, I know it's hard to hear. Practice recording your interviews for 3-4 hours.
  5. Wherever you go to buy something, ask for a 10% discount. I don't remember who gave me this advice. I heard it on a podcast. You will be rejected a lot. Rejection is completely fine. You will be interviewed for many positions and you will be rejected. Be okay with people who say no to you. Not much will be told. Being rejected sucks and is miserable. But it's okay. By being rejected so much, it will teach you how to overcome objections.
  6. Each interview begins with the hiring manager who is highly suspicious of you and will suspect that you can't get the job done. The tactic above will teach you how to handle objections in an interview about why a hiring manager doesn't think they can handle the job.
  7. Recite the company's mission statement in the interview. This will blow the hiring manager / interviewer speechless. It only takes 5% extra effort to write or memorize a company mission statement.
  8. If there is an unconvincing mission statement. Cancel the interview because you don't want to work there anyway.
  9. If they tell you that you have no experience. Ask them what kind of experience you need and then go out there and get that experience. No matter what it is. You can get the experience. Do freelance work for 1-2 years and add it to your resume. Volunteer for a nonprofit organization and do the job that most closely resembles that experience. This is what I did.
  10. You can do all of the above and still be rejected. Building resilience is challenging. I saw an interview on the Daily Show with a guy who trains Navy Seals. I do not remember his name. The most coveted skill you seek to develop in a stamp is resilience. Evolution is a story of resilience, not survival of the fittest. The strong also die. Winners evolve and choose how to respond to the circumstances presented to them. Being introverted and flustered by awkward silence is normal. Get comfortable feeling uncomfortable.

I hope this information helps you! If you need help with honest feedback on interview recordings, please message me. I have a free video solution that can help you.

This is a nice question but it is complicated as it depends a lot on many aspects of life.

Because I know you so well, I understand all your wishes and I listen to your dreams, the course you are taking I think these are the best jobs for you ...

Astronaut, undertaker. Brain Surgeon, Lifeguard, Landscaper, Gardening, Chef, Florists, Winemaker, Stamp Collector, Kindergarten Teacher

I wonder if you think there is a better generic job out there, then in that case, don't quit school or college ... you should keep studying forever.

Have you talked to your family and friends about the best jobs in

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This is a nice question but it is complicated as it depends a lot on many aspects of life.

Because I know you so well, I understand all your wishes and I listen to your dreams, the course you are taking I think these are the best jobs for you ...

Astronaut, undertaker. Brain Surgeon, Lifeguard, Landscaper, Gardening, Chef, Florists, Winemaker, Stamp Collector, Kindergarten Teacher

I wonder if you think there is a better generic job out there, then in that case, don't quit school or college ... you should keep studying forever.

Have you talked to your family and friends about the best jobs in the world? What did your teacher say when he asked you?

Point out that you need to be more detailed and provide more information to allow people to see how you fit into the world because everyone has an ideal job and the job they want.

People have ideas that a job is the best job, but once in it, either they love it or they quit, check in with family and friends and ask for their reactions and feelings about their job and what they dreamed of.

So the best job is always the one that you are passionate about and you see yourself doing it until the end of your life, because you love it, you will not want to leave it.

But life will change the way you think as you mature

I like landscaping and gardening, cooking, brain surgery, as many people need it.

Have you ever heard the saying

The flesh of one man is the poison of another ... what I like you will not necessarily like ... Mmmmm I'm thinking about philosophy

The biggest problem with first job placement is lack of experience (which creates a complicated paradox as it is difficult to get a job due to lack of experience at the same time that you do not gain experience unless you get a job)
Well, I suggest 3 ways to solve this problem:

1- Internship - paid or not. Getting an internship, even if it's unpaid, will put you on the market, gain valuable experience, and understand your work in a way that you may never have considered while studying. This is an incredible investment in any career, as it is an incredible way to start. After a while you can get g

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The biggest problem with first job placement is lack of experience (which creates a complicated paradox as it is difficult to get a job due to lack of experience at the same time that you do not gain experience unless you get a job)
Well, I suggest 3 ways to solve this problem:

1- Internship - paid or not. Getting an internship, even if it's unpaid, will put you on the market, gain valuable experience, and understand your work in a way that you may never have considered while studying. This is an incredible investment in any career, as it is an incredible way to start. After a while, you can get good raises, a stronger curriculum, and do our second way of landing a job:

2- Networking: networking is very important for the success of any worker. With networking you will make contacts with people who are already placed in the market. These people, being within the companies can inform you about job opportunities and give good news about you about those opportunities, being well connected does wonders for your career and growth, and one way to do it is by participating in all the events related to your job. And don't be shy about chatting with people in those places and making connections. Another way to do it is our third suggestion:

3- Get lower job opportunities, but in companies that work on your career path: You can get a simple position in a company that is solid in mechanical engineering, this will help you maintain an initial income (which it seems you will need) while you build your connections, and also being there will keep you abreast of opportunities that arise. After a while, you can show your interest in the area and show that you can be more useful and more valuable in your objective career than in the current place, that will give you easier access than the one that comes from now on. Also, if your curriculum shows that you worked for a company that is strong in your area of ​​interest, even if your role was not directly related, your chances of attracting the interest of other companies for an interview improve,

Good luck and I hope it can be of help.

Thanks for the A2A, Zoe Robert.

How should you get your first job? In addition to simply submitting resumes and writing cover letters, you need to creatively implement lesser-known job search tactics that most people don't actually use.

Here are some examples of tactics I used to find my first job:

  • I communicated not only with friends and family, but also with alumni from my school and their friends and family, which involved a lot of cold emails, inMail messages on LinkedIn, etc. Usually my emails included something about whether they knew someone who was looking for a job to
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Thanks for the A2A, Zoe Robert.

How should you get your first job? In addition to simply submitting resumes and writing cover letters, you need to creatively implement lesser-known job search tactics that most people don't actually use.

Here are some examples of tactics I used to find my first job:

  • I communicated not only with friends and family, but also with alumni from my school and their friends and family, which involved a lot of cold emails, inMail messages on LinkedIn, etc. Usually my emails included something about whether they knew someone who was looking for a job to fill.
  • I attended every professional event that I was allowed to attend, had a conversation with every successful professional I met, and always ended the conversation with a question like: can you invite me to event X? This allowed me to make deeper connections with the people I met at professional events, sometimes leading to referrals for jobs that came up in the places where these people worked.
  • I asked my existing professional contacts (sometimes people I had only known for a few weeks, sometimes people I had met in my past internships) to email my resume to their friends.

I hope this helps.

  1. Leadership first.
  2. Second company.
  3. Third role.

Don't let money have anything to do with your first job.

But many of my friends and classmates chose money and living close to home.

Was I stupid to choose the job that earned 40% less?

This is how it happened ...

Company A had a great brand, an impressive office, a 5-in-depth interview panel of really smart executives.

But when I walked through the floor of more than 50 people, it was strangely quiet.

When we did 1: 1 interviews, they took me to their offices and locked the door. Something didn't feel right.

The BI company had worked part-time at the university and had laid off t

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  1. Leadership first.
  2. Second company.
  3. Third role.

Don't let money have anything to do with your first job.

But many of my friends and classmates chose money and living close to home.

Was I stupid to choose the job that earned 40% less?

This is how it happened ...

Company A had a great brand, an impressive office, a 5-in-depth interview panel of really smart executives.

But when I walked through the floor of more than 50 people, it was strangely quiet.

When we did 1: 1 interviews, they took me to their offices and locked the door. Something didn't feel right.

BI company had worked part time at the university and the district manager who was on top of me had been fired for fraud. If he got this job, he would be his replacement.

This was a bad guy - he had hired all of his friends and relatives to work, but they weren't working or cashing a paycheck.

There were ~ 40 people in this district and maybe 25 needed to be laid off.

I was 21 years old and had no other management experience than the leadership positions in my fraternity and co-captain of the club's baseball team.

I thought there was no way I would get the job, and what would I do if I did? This was a job with 5-10 years of management experience.

"It won't be easy but I will invest in you"

I remember those words when the manager of Company B called to make the offer.

It wasn't rational at the time, but without hesitation I signed with Company B, canceled my study abroad trip to China (and ate a $ 2k plane ticket) and started the next day.

Company A was Nortel Networks. In 2 years they filed for bankruptcy.

Go with your instincts and follow the great leaders.

Great leaders are those who trust and will invest in you.

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