How do I ask a person why they turned down a job offer?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Rowan Ewing



How do I ask a person why they turned down a job offer?

To be professional. Let the person know that your organization was very interested in them joining. Also, check with the candidate why they chose to decline your offer. In fact, candidates are sometimes reluctant to share the truth, so you can instruct them to post their experience anonymously on wwwdotreviewiadotco. We have created this website so that candidates can share authentic feedback that employers can use to improve the candidate experience and also the overall hiring process. While it's a brand new website, we already see some really powerful ideas available to employers.

The best way to do this is to include the following three key points in your conversation:

  1. A funny thank you
  2. A well thought out justification
  3. Forward moment

Thank you The
first thing to start with when you decline a job offer is a sincere thank you to the person who extended the offer. Be sure to communicate that you appreciate the offer and state that you respect both the organization and the other person; do not make it appear that the position was below you or that you did not give the offer serious consideration and consideration. .
Rationale
Here is your rationale for

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The best way to do this is to include the following three key points in your conversation:

  1. A funny thank you
  2. A well thought out justification
  3. Forward moment

Thank you The
first thing to start with when you decline a job offer is a sincere thank you to the person who extended the offer. Be sure to communicate that you appreciate the offer and state that you respect both the organization and the other person; do not make it appear that the position was below you or that you did not give the offer serious consideration and consideration. .
Fundamental reason
Then comes your rationale for turning down the job. This is the most difficult aspect of the conversation, but also the most important. There are countless reasons why a job won't fit perfectly and many of them are perfectly plausible and valid. Others may be harder to justify or express (it's hard to refuse because the hiring manager is an idiot or because you can't bear to leave the West Coast).
Even if your rationale deviates from politically correct or socially acceptable, 99% of the time you can communicate even the most sensitive reasons in a tactful and professional manner. Here's some helpful language on five common reasons you might decline an offer:

  • External factors: geography, family, time. It is always easier to blame a decision on someone or something else: If issues beyond your control prevent you from accepting a position, be honest: "Unfortunately, I cannot make the change due to family obligations." Or, "As much as I am interested in the position, I have decided that this is not the right time to uproot my family and move to the other side of the country."
  • Money - It's absolutely okay to turn down a position that doesn't pay well (enough). You are allowed to say, "I wish I could make it work, however I need to have a higher level of compensation. I'm sure you will understand."
  • Lack of Skills / Qualifications: If you don't have the necessary skills to get the ball out of the park or if you suspect that you are being set to fail, then the best way to retire is to say this: "After much consideration, I have decided that I cannot overcome expectations realistically and that I would never want to join an organization where I can't deliver on promises and deliveries. "
  • People Problems: You can't tell someone that they or your colleagues don't like you, but you can use "cultural adjustment" as a starting point when your personality doesn't match a team or organization. For example, "I respect the work that all of you do, but I don't think it is right for me personally. I will keep looking for something more relaxed / more entrepreneurial / with a flatter organizational structure, etc..
  • Dead End: If a job is attractive today but won't get you in the right direction toward your ultimate career goals, you have the right to say so. People will generally respect your long-term career goals. "As much as I'd love to join the team, I really need to get some fundraising experience so I can transition to a development role in the next few years. Truth be told, the program director position isn't going to do that. for me."

Moving Forward
Once you've given a serious reason why you turned down the position, thank your counterpart again and offer to stay in touch or wish them luck with the hiring process. You may acknowledge that you would like to be aware of new opportunities or review the situation if your external factors change. It's not crazy to think that the employer who fires today may be attracting you in the future, so keep the relationship positive and the door open.

Depends on the situation.

There are people who will tell you that it is unethical.
There are people who will tell you to do what is best for you.

The truth lies somewhere in between.

Look, the basic facts of life are these.

We live and work in a capitalist society.
Workers are commodities, particularly in STEM roles, but now pretty much everywhere.
Accepting a role and withdrawing after accepting is totally acceptable. It's all how you approach the discussion.

If, after considering the role, you decide that you have changed your mind, it is best to make that decision now during acceptance.

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Depends on the situation.

There are people who will tell you that it is unethical.
There are people who will tell you to do what is best for you.

The truth lies somewhere in between.

Look, the basic facts of life are these.

We live and work in a capitalist society.
Workers are commodities, particularly in STEM roles, but now pretty much everywhere.
Accepting a role and withdrawing after accepting is totally acceptable. It's all how you approach the discussion.

If, after considering the position, you decide that you have changed your mind, it is better to make that decision now during the acceptance phase than after you have left your current job and started your new one.

Most of us are very busy. We don't usually take the time to consider what it really means to take the job. Often times, this understanding does not occur until you are about to give your notice at your current job, or prepare to be mentally and physically ready to begin a new role.

If you are in ANY doubt as to whether this is the correct position, the answer should be NO. Never enter a new role with reservations or feeling that you need to continue in the new role JUST because you have accepted it. That's not a good sign. You should NEVER commit to something as important as blame-based or "compensation" employment.

There are many legitimate reasons to retire after accepting a new position.

  1. New to the area and unfamiliar with the location and the company.
  2. Excessive travel commitments, including "super commute" (3-4 hours a day).
  3. Contract roles vs. permanent. Nobody really wants to be a contingent member of staff.
  4. Inadequate benefits.
  5. Limited time off or no pay.
  6. Joining a 'project' vs. joining a team and / or a company.
  7. Great pressure from recruiters and account executives working on commission. If they don't close a sale by hiring you, they don't make money.
  8. Limited / no opportunity to advance.
  9. Money (and this is usually at the top of the list, but not the most important consideration after a certain level).
  10. Ability to be in control of your own destiny.
  11. Responsibility to the family for the presence, stability and enough energy to be available and not be brain dead from work or the stress of travel.
  12. The ability to live a life outside of work.

I recently accepted an offer and canceled my acceptance. An outside recruiter put a LOT of pressure on me to make a decision before finishing the interviews and final offers. I was asked to make a decision before I could properly evaluate the opportunities. This is, of course, exactly what they were hoping for with an aggressive push to 'close' my candidacy.

So I made a bad initial decision when accepting the offer. After several offers came in, I had to evaluate them against each other on their own merits. I realized that I had made a big mistake with my engagement. I withdrew my application after 2 days of acceptance. At the same time, the company I agreed to work for made an aggressive effort to get me started the same week, even after I told them I already had a job that I hadn't announced yet. This was a red flag and my radar was active and it made me see this situation from a different perspective. In hindsight, it is clear that this was a tactic for me to start immediately so that there were no other offers up for grabs. Pushy sales tactics often produce highly unpredictable results.

As I sat down to prepare to give notice to my current employer, and to begin to be mentally and logistically ready to take on the new role, I realized that I would be signing up for a 4+ hour commute every day. He was new to the area and didn't understand the time commitment involved in commuting to and from work.

In hindsight, both the recruiter and the account executives knew what I was committing to in terms of travel. They also knew that this was not a viable work trip. No one in their right mind would sign up for that unless they had no other alternatives. They pushed to 'close' the sale because that is the business they are in.

I realized that there was no possible way I could endure that kind of trip. The next morning, I sent an email and explained that I could not accept the position and that I would be retiring.

The setback of the account executive was initially very strong. When I agreed to speak to her on the phone, things calmed down. I explained to him that an aggressive "closure" of my candidacy really was a disservice to all interested parties. If he took on the role, he would end up quitting shortly after. No one could handle that kind of commute. It was a Lose / Lose situation. I would lose my current job, I would lose my new job, and I would be unemployed. The client employer would lose the resource they desperately wanted, and the recruiter and account executive would lose the revenue. In all likelihood I would end up burning several bridges, including my own, in the process.

We agreed to let the acceptance fail. They weren't happy, but it's my choice.

Sometimes there are circumstances beyond the control of the candidate that result in the rejection of an accepted offer.

Pushy sales and closing tactics from AE's and recruiters can produce highly unpredictable results. For them, they just want to put an approved body in a chair so they can collect commissions and waste.

Good recruiters, account executives, and hiring managers know that it's not just about the sale. They will give you the time you need to make the best decision for your own needs and circumstances. If you don't accept the offer, they usually agree to that too. People come and go from companies every day. It is a great risk to force someone to take on a role that they are not comfortable with, for whatever reason. Good managers know that a single bad hire can ruin a team.

It is up to each person to assess their own needs and tolerance for risk. Rejecting an acceptance is totally fine. It is your life, your family, your money that depends on this decision. Honor has nothing to do with it. You cannot eat cheap nobility.

If you feel compelled to stick to your decision because it is a matter of personal honor, I will not discourage you. If you are interested in US workplace standards, I can tell you after more than 25 years as a senior human resources executive at three knowledge worker research and development companies that the people who get better deals after to accept ours, they usually just told us they were taking the best offer. , and that was that. So we had the option to counter. You will not violate any rule to notify (politely) your employer that you received an unexpected offer that is better.

(Ignore the above if you ignored your acceptance

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If you feel compelled to stick to your decision because it is a matter of personal honor, I will not discourage you. If you are interested in US workplace standards, I can tell you after more than 25 years as a senior human resources executive at three knowledge worker research and development companies that the people who get better deals after to accept ours, they usually just told us they were taking the best offer. , and that was that. So we had the option to counter. You will not violate any rule to notify (politely) your employer that you received an unexpected offer that is better.

(Ignore the above if you ignored your commitment to accept the first company, kept actively searching, and found a better offer. That's a different fact pattern.)

Decide to spend about 15 minutes playing with chips and a large marker. I have used this method for over 10 years to support decision making with a wide variety of technology projects, personal businesses, non-business issues, real estate portfolios, etc. Doctors, executives, designers, architects, therapists, audiophile recording engineers. and nominated for several Grammys. and a biodiesel recycling entrepreneur. It can help clarify your priorities so that when you make a decision:

  1. Know how you got there;
  2. Know which alternatives are more and less attractive; and
  3. Being able to negotiate sensibly, frankly, and professionally, which both employers are likely to respect and appreciate.

Put the name of each employer and their offer on a single card. Let's call the first offering Alpha and the second Beta.

Under the Alpha ID Offer Card, start adding cards with a single large positive or negative handwriting for continuous instant transfer to your brain. Do the same with the Beta offer.

You'll end up with your two options outlined in columns side by side on a table, with the deals, attractions, and downsides of each. You can then play around with the compensation numbers to think about whether to accept the Beta offer firmly, or entertain an accountant if Alpha should bring one.

To practice, write the Beta offer on a card and stick it on the Alpha list. Now the offers are the same. What company do you prefer if there is no difference in payment?

If it's Alpha, ask yourself if the extra Beta payment really outweighs the benefits of Alpha. If it's Beta, ask yourself how much Alpha would have to counter to make it stick with them.

Tokens are a way of supplementing a huge deficit in the human brain called "working memory." In short: working memory is like a small sorting machine that contains incoming information for further deletion or processing. A complex decision like this has too many elements to take into account simultaneously. By stating the elements of the question in a short and easily readable way, you are flooding your brain with variables as you think about what is most important and promising to you.

When you've been playing around for a while, chances are that (based on about 10 years of experience prototyping this method) you'll have:

  • A different image of the decision;
  • A better sense of comparison between the alternatives;
  • A more stable idea of ​​which option you prefer;
  • An enhanced ability to discuss your preferences in analytical and mature terms.

Is salary the only reason you are turning it down, or is there some other reason the offer has soured (I mean, if you are getting an offer, it stands to reason that you made the effort to apply and interview, so he must have been interested at some point).

If money is the only reason, you don't have to turn down the job outright. Simply respond to say, "Thanks for the offer, but I'm afraid I really can't take the position for a salary of less than $ X," where "$ X" is your absolute minimum acceptable wage.

This is not going to be a negotiation where you come and go a lot,

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Is salary the only reason you are turning it down, or is there some other reason the offer has soured (I mean, if you are getting an offer, it stands to reason that you made the effort to apply and interview, so he must have been interested at some point).

If money is the only reason, you don't have to turn down the job outright. Simply respond to say, "Thanks for the offer, but I'm afraid I really can't take the position for a salary of less than $ X," where "$ X" is your absolute minimum acceptable wage.

This will not be a negotiation where you come and go a lot, that does not benefit either of you. The person making the offer has their hands tied as to what they can offer or made you a low offer. And that's great, you can't blame them for that, because they have to do what's best for them in the long run.

And you don't want to try and give them an impromptu number in the hopes of coming and going a few times and getting the salary you want. They probably don't need it as much, so if you tell them what your lowest acceptable number is, they:

  • Accept that figure, or
  • Accept their counter offer as if you politely declined their initial offer.

It will almost certainly be the only offer and counter offer that will take place in the vast majority of salary negotiations. One of you entered the interview process with a very different understanding of the salary being offered / demanded, and there is really only one significant exchange after that. If they come back with a new offer that is still low for you, you will leave. If they give you a higher offer and you decide to fight back, they are much more likely to leave because every day they waste negotiating with you is another unproductive day where the job they are hiring for is not getting done, so they are losing. . money. And if they make a new offer and you counter with something that is clearly reducing them, they will leave too.

So that's the point that you give your lowest acceptable claim: no one wants to waste your time, least of all you. If they are unwilling to comply with your demand, he walks away. At the same time, clearly letting them know what the lowest salary you can accept is lets them know that you are serious and that you know how much your time is worth to you (you may not know what it is worth objectively in the job market, but that too It helps them: If you want a CEO salary for a post in the mailroom, they know there is too great a disparity to overcome. But if they tried to offer you an associate level salary for what you clearly understand as an intern, or Senior Position level, they can see that you are not desperate or an idiot if you stand firm and insist on a realistic salary demand.

The answer will depend on the level of the position and if it will require you to transfer. Remember that companies seek to hire employees who can make decisions, and hesitating over a bid decision is one of the main reasons bids are withdrawn. Let's break them down into some general guidelines.

Hourly positions - fast food, labor, construction, retail, factory work, etc. will generally not require relocation, and the employer will need a response within a couple of hours, if not on-site.

Entry-level to mid-level salaried positions: generally graduates, only at the beginning of the career

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The answer will depend on the level of the position and if it will require you to transfer. Remember that companies seek to hire employees who can make decisions, and hesitating over a bid decision is one of the main reasons bids are withdrawn. Let's break them down into some general guidelines.

Hourly positions - fast food, labor, construction, retail, factory work, etc. will generally not require relocation, and the employer will need a response within a couple of hours, if not on-site.

Entry-level to mid-level salaried positions, typically graduates, early career accountants, financial analysts, technicians, nurses, etc. hired locally, should require a response within 24 hours. If it is a relocation, a maximum of 48 to 72 hours should be enough time to respond.

Senior professionals and managers - seasoned engineers, accounting managers, sales managers, nurse practitioners, financial analysts, industrial designers, etc. should be able to make a decision within 24 to 48 hours if they are local, with a possible extension 72 hours for positions requiring relocation. Any details that need to be negotiated must be resolved quickly or the offer will disappear.

Executives - Positions such as CEO, CFO, directors, etc., will require a more extensive process of negotiating salaries, benefits, bonuses, relocation expenses, grants / stock options, etc., and you can expect these discussions to be longer than low. Level positions, which often take weeks to complete.

New graduates, especially those in Engineering or Computer Science, and sometimes other disciplines, are a special case. New graduates in high-demand disciplines will often meet on campus with a dozen companies, conduct a few on-site interviews, and receive various offers. Those interviews and offers often span a period of several weeks or months, and you may not be asked to respond to an offer until the process is complete. However, keep in mind that some companies extend two or three offers for each open position. Once the required number of positions are filled, the remaining pending offers are rescinded.

Good luck!

I have turned down two different offers from two different times in my "work" life for two different reasons. The first I did not feel any remorse. The other later in my adult life I felt like shit because they seemed to really like me. But honestly, when I called, I said I wouldn't take the job after all, after hanging up the phone I felt an incredible sense of relief. As if a rope had been removed from my neck. As if the uncertainty of accepting the job or not accepting it was completely eliminated. That I knew for sure that this time I made the right decision. So much I felt great guilt for

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I have turned down two different offers from two different times in my "work" life for two different reasons. The first I did not feel any remorse. The other later in my adult life I felt like shit because they seemed to really like me. But honestly, when I called, I said I wouldn't take the job after all, after hanging up the phone I felt an incredible sense of relief. As if a rope had been removed from my neck. As if the uncertainty of accepting the job or not accepting it was completely eliminated. That I knew for sure that this time I made the right decision. As much as I felt very guilty for saying no after saying yes, I felt 10 times more relief. I have no excuses.

My instincts AND my true desire told me that the decision I made to accept was wrong and that I would not be happy if I spent 40 hours a week working a job that was not what I really wanted. 40 hours a week going somewhere I don't want to be, that's crazy. I have come to realize that a career is a series of jobs. A job is an experience, not a destination. A career like life itself is a series of experiences that shape your work life.

I understand that some people see it as a lack of commitment. I see it as a commitment to you first and everyone and everyone else second. Your commitment to yourself gives you integrity as long as you are not intentionally shackling others. Also, you know what I realized working in the corporate world for all those years, especially my last job (which I finally quit to work for me), you are expendable to them. You are not as important to them as they make you believe. Managers, owners, supervisors, etc. They may be great, but you are one of a million employees. A job with great benefits and great people can make it easier to stay. But if you really want to do something somewhere else, "cool" means shit.

Anyway, most work contacts are at will, correct, and probably not to protect you, but to protect them.

Regardless: your life is yours. Guide him down the path you imagine and believe or let him lead you down a path that you don't want to follow and you will inevitably regret it.

It seems that your heart is not determined to accept the role, so I would say that maybe you follow your instincts and reject it. It can be quite damaging to your own psyche to accept the role out of a sense of obligation and then realize that you have accepted something that is not really what you want. As fun as it is to work in a good team, if the work you're doing isn't what you want, it won't matter. It will show in the work you do, and you'll spend a lot of time playing the "what if" game on your desk.

For the good of the company, it is absolutely best to politely decline the offer as soon as possible. A goo

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It seems that your heart is not determined to accept the role, so I would say that maybe you follow your instincts and reject it. It can be quite damaging to your own psyche to accept the role out of a sense of obligation and then realize that you have accepted something that is not really what you want. As fun as it is to work in a good team, if the work you're doing isn't what you want, it won't matter. It will show in the work you do, and you'll spend a lot of time playing the "what if" game on your desk.

For the good of the company, it is absolutely best to politely decline the offer as soon as possible. A good way to put it is that you have to retire from the job in order to pursue a different career. You are not required to continue with the position because they have started processing visa requirements etc, but they will need time to search for a new candidate.

Hi guys!

If the task or organization does not suit you well or if you do not feel that the organization is good. Of course, there are other reasons for turning down a job opportunity, but what if your employer interviews you for another job? What if the invitation for the second or third round of job interviews is for that job and you don't think it's the right thing to do?

One of the reasons you are hesitant to accept the job offer is that you have not taken the time to actually present yourself for this position during the time you have spent at the job interview.

Take a few minutes to react.

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Hi guys!

If the task or organization does not suit you well or if you do not feel that the organization is good. Of course, there are other reasons for turning down a job opportunity, but what if your employer interviews you for another job? What if the invitation for the second or third round of job interviews is for that job and you don't think it's the right thing to do?

One of the reasons you are hesitant to accept the job offer is that you have not taken the time to actually present yourself for this position during the time you have spent at the job interview.

Take a few minutes to get a real idea of ​​the position and the factor you know about the culture of the company and the team, the benefits you get and anything relevant that you consider relevant.

  • So you need to ask yourself if you would take the job if you got a better salary, better performance, or a higher degree of seniority, and then find out what you could ask for and what would make you happy.
  • At this point in the game, your hiring manager will likely try to pressure you to take on this task within a set period of time.
  • If you counter offer them, you may not get everything you want, but you should at least keep that in mind.
  • If the job is not for you and you know you cannot ask for anything, write your argument and continue looking for a job that suits your needs.
  • If you decide to decline a job, you must act quickly, or you may face many questions about why you should decline it.
  • This includes thanking the hiring manager for the offer and making it clear that you will not be joining the company. If you decide not to accept the job, here are some tips on how to maintain good relations with your employer and reject the job.

You should include a short summary of your argument, which will insult your employer but will not reveal too much about your next company, especially if it is a job offer. It's okay to turn down a job if you have a bad experience with your employer, but it's best to just let it go.

We will consider how we can tell your employer that you accept the offer and decline the job without giving them your reasons. And we will see how he rejects the position without burning any bridges. After weighing your options and accepting the job, contact your preferred employer and make a decision or negotiate various offers until you are satisfied.

After careful consideration, you decide to take another position but cannot accept the offer. With this done, it is time to turn your attention to the very company that failed to make the cut. You know this company has taken the time to interview you and clearly wants you to work for them.

Although it may appear that you have achieved the purpose of rejecting it, it is important to exercise common courtesy and to issue formal dismissals so that you can offer the position to another candidate. Thanks to your interviewer for the opportunity and thanks for all the time he spent with you.

If your goal is to decline the job offer without much emotion, you will never know when your paths will cross again. Don't give details of what you like or don't like about the company or position, but give a brief explanation of why you are in a different position.

If you are offered an interview, you should politely and quickly decline the invitation. In this article, I give some reasons why I decline the interview and some templates to use when contacting employers to decline interviews and some tips on how to do this professionally. You could make a list of when you quit the job interview for a position or a company that just doesn't fit.

If you are actively looking for work, you may one day have to turn down a credible job offer. If you are looking for a job, it may seem like a rejection to turn down a job opportunity.

If you act professionally and give a valid reason for your decision, there are no hard feelings. Turning down a job offer can be tricky if you don't want to burn bridges or damage your professional reputation.

Get the job offer in writing and request 24-48 hours to review the terms of the offer. At a minimum, the offer must contain information on:


-Job title
date -Start
-Salary
-Person they are informing
the -Provide contingencies that must be met (depending on the industry, which could include selecting a drug)
-Benefits Summary (vacations, holidays, etc.)


You should also have specific information about the health insurance they offer. If the salary is an increase from your current job, but the monthly insurance premium is high, that could nullify the salary increase.


If you have any that

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Get the job offer in writing and request 24-48 hours to review the terms of the offer. At a minimum, the offer must contain information on:


-Job title
date -Start
-Salary
-Person they are informing
the -Provide contingencies that must be met (depending on the industry, which could include selecting a drug)
-Benefits Summary (vacations, holidays, etc.)


You should also have specific information about the health insurance they offer. If the salary is an increase from your current job, but the monthly insurance premium is high, that could nullify the salary increase.


If you have any questions or concerns about the job offer, make an appointment to speak with Human Resources. If there are some aspects of the offer that you want to change, see what the possibilities may be to negotiate an upgrade on the package. When this is approached as a calm conversation (not an ultimatum or other heavy-handed tactic), it keeps it in a positive light.


Good luck!

Because it is good information to have, the hiring manager often asks if the recruiter is an agency or a company. Losing 10 people in a row to the same company paints a different picture than losing 10 people, but they all went to different companies. One shows that they need to improve their hiring process across the board (or salary, benefits, etc.), while the other shows that they need to research what Company X does so that everyone can see if something can be done internally to compete. .

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