How do I approach hostile interviewers?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Louis Ward



How do I approach hostile interviewers?

Part of growing up is learning to say "Fuck you!" and when to smile and say, "Okay, great!"

Regardless of whether the interviewer is yelling at you or making you chocolate chip cookies, you must understand that this person is the gatekeeper…. This is what should happen in your mind.

Ideally, the interviewer should do everything possible to make you comfortable. A good interviewer knows that he is also a salesperson for the company. If they put off a bad vibe, it will show up on places like Glassdoor. Companies that have superior interview processes (easier for the candidate and more

Keep reading

Part of growing up is learning to say "Fuck you!" and when to smile and say, "Okay, great!"

Regardless of whether the interviewer is yelling at you or making you chocolate chip cookies, you must understand that this person is the gatekeeper…. This is what should happen in your mind.

Ideally, the interviewer should do everything possible to make you comfortable. A good interviewer knows that he is also a salesperson for the company. If they put off a bad vibe, it will show up on places like Glassdoor. Companies that have superior interview processes (easier for the candidate and more pleasant) generally have more candidates.

Unless the interview is trying to exclude candidates who cannot perform well under pressure, the interviewer should do everything possible to make you comfortable. They want to see you at your best. I suspect that someone who is in the interviewing business (recruiters and hiring managers) and is a complete jerk will not be there for long. Even if they are in a position of power, they will rule out of fear and the second their new hire has a better deal with a kinder boss, that employee will leave!


Join my Facebook group if you want to learn interview secrets from someone who has been to both sides of the table.

Every interview situation is artificial and often strange to both parties. A friendly interviewer holding your hand during the interview and giving you feedback is the worst possible sign.

The recruiter's job is as objective as possible to find the best candidate for the vacancy among many 100 candidates. This kind interviewer won't get the job done or feels sorry for you because you've already failed. Both options are not good.

It is your job as a professional to treat all hiring situations the same regardless of whether you like the recruiter or not. you

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Every interview situation is artificial and often strange to both parties. A friendly interviewer holding your hand during the interview and giving you feedback is the worst possible sign.

The recruiter's job is as objective as possible to find the best candidate for the vacancy among many 100 candidates. This kind interviewer won't get the job done or feels sorry for you because you've already failed. Both options are not good.

It is your job as a professional to treat all hiring situations the same regardless of whether you like the recruiter or not. You need to sell yourself in the situation and a fairly reserved recruiter helps you much more than a friendly and chatty one.

Later in the company you will also find different types of characters with whom you will have to work together.

Hey guy.

Look, 27. I only have a few years with you, but my tribes and tribulations have fortunately given me some experience beyond my years.

There will be many responses here from many people of different age groups and backgrounds, with many different responses based on their own personal experiences and feelings, etc. I'm just going to tell you how I feel. It is necessary given your age and my own personal experiences. No offense intended, but something like the way you need to tell a child certain things in a certain way, in order for them to understand.

I personally am a relative

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Hey guy.

Look, 27. I only have a few years with you, but my tribes and tribulations have fortunately given me some experience beyond my years.

There will be many responses here from many people of different age groups and backgrounds, with many different responses based on their own personal experiences and feelings, etc. I'm just going to tell you how I feel. It is necessary given your age and my own personal experiences. No offense intended, but something like the way you need to tell a child certain things in a certain way, in order for them to understand.

I personally am kind of a job seeker, I have had more than 60 jobs in my life and I only have 27. It is kind of a shame, but I am also proud of it. And I'm sorry for this answer book, but I feel like it will make sense in the end.

I spent 10 years in Wisconsin, from the age of 11 to 22, so I had the experience of working the jobs that a young teenager would work in that area, demographically, being ... hay-packing in the summer, milking cows, cutting lawn, any type of landscaping, allow the season, etc. And the economy in Wisconsin was very interesting in that growing season because after my first job, and keep in mind I thought exactly how you did with Sonic tonight, I had realized that employers need us a lot more than they need us. we need them. It's kind of a retaliation, kind of a system-minded bullshit, just because I grew up in retaliation for most of my teens. But I have never had a problem getting a job due to all my experiences, since they have been to many places. That'

But I digress, the point is, I'm sure that in the city you live in, there are 50 more restaurants waiting to hire the next person. If you are currently in the food industry ... then you already have one foot in the door elsewhere. I know you are young and I do not know your situation, whether at home or at work, what you have to do, what you have to do, or what you should do ...

You said you're 16 so I guess you live at home, again, I don't know how your personal life is going, but I wouldn't worry too much about your boss firing you or failing in life, or something too severe. I have seen, met and spoken with people in their 40s to 45s to 50s who work in fast food and the kinds of jobs people their age should be working in, with no intention of offending, I'm sure as you get older it will. I understand what I'm talking about. What I'm trying to say is that it seems like you already have one foot in the door with being an adult too.

No, I repeat, don't underestimate yourself and the work you do for employers these days is having a hard time feeling positions because of the unreliable people and the other work incentives that currently exist. There are places that will offer paychecks every week, as weekly payments. As well as places to be offered through third-party apps or businesses: daily pay, early access to paychecks, things that make life work like health insurance, dental child care, etc. These are things you don't have to worry about right now, but they are things you should seriously consider today.

Ultimately what I'm trying to say is, don't worry about it, the place at the end of the street will hire you for similar hours and similar pay, if not at the next place on the street or anywhere in between. If you drive or have a car and can drive legally, it is located anywhere within an hour distance if you can make that work with the school, even if it is part time. Again, I assume you live at home so you don't have to pay rent, even if you do, it should cover your current expenses and utilities.

I wish you all the best, my friend, I wish I had the Internet and access to the opinions of millions of people when I was your age to figure things out.

I had a pen, a notepad, a backpack, a small bag of marijuana, some friends, and a phone that worked about two out of every 12 months because I had a hard time getting a job when I was your age ... take all the help I can. Can you, don?

Well, if you really mean it, you have to have a job offer ready first.

If you just say "Get me promoted or I'll start looking for another job," then they'll assume that since your heart is no longer in it, it's better to get fired right now than to have a disgruntled employee hanging around. maybe for months.

So silently, and without saying anything, start applying for other jobs.

Once you have an offer, either in a higher-level position or at a significantly higher salary, you can take that offer to your boss and say:

"I think I'm underrated here, and it should have been

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Well, if you really mean it, you have to have a job offer ready first.

If you just say "Get me promoted or I'll start looking for another job," then they'll assume that since your heart is no longer in it, it's better to get fired right now than to have a disgruntled employee hanging around. maybe for months.

So silently, and without saying anything, start applying for other jobs.

Once you have an offer, either in a higher-level position or at a significantly higher salary, you can take that offer to your boss and say:

“I think I am underrated here and should have been promoted. I have a job offer from XYZcorp, right here in my hand. They have offered to give me the responsibility that I think I deserve. However, I am loyal to this company and I love my job. If you can recognize my contributions and give me a promotion and adequate pay compensation, I would love to stay. I have 10 days to decide whether to accept this new job or not, so I wanted to offer you the opportunity to stay on board. "

... that way, if doing this bothers them (and it could), you have an exit strategy, and if they choose not to promote it, which can happen if there are no higher grade positions available, then you will probably be glad to jump out of the box. boat.

But, if you can't find another job anywhere else at a higher grade level, then maybe they're right and you're not ready for promotion yet.

If you are cheated on and cannot change jobs, you are in a very bad position.

You don't have to do this face-to-face if that makes you uncomfortable, you can send a written note or email if necessary, but I think a face-to-face meeting with the job offer literally at your fingertips - it's going to be more effective.

No one can "stop" negative thoughts.

To a large extent, your thoughts are not completely under your control at any given time.

Most of the thoughts that enter your head are subconscious in nature and therefore not directly under your control.

Nevertheless…

Just because you can't stop negative thoughts doesn't mean you can't stop negative thoughts.

This is what I mean.

Most people can't stop their brains from conjuring up a negative or less than ideal thought.

Maybe it's a thought about your romantic partner, your job, your money, your life, your purpose, or whatever.

You cannot control the presence of that thought.

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No one can "stop" negative thoughts.

To a large extent, your thoughts are not completely under your control at any given time.

Most of the thoughts that enter your head are subconscious in nature and therefore not directly under your control.

Nevertheless…

Just because you can't stop negative thoughts doesn't mean you can't stop negative thoughts.

This is what I mean.

Most people can't stop their brains from conjuring up a negative or less than ideal thought.

Maybe it's a thought about your romantic partner, your job, your money, your life, your purpose, or whatever.

You cannot control the presence of that thought, but you can choose whether or not you will dwell on it and whether or not you will allow it to control your conscious thought.

Let me give you an example.

Let's imagine that you and your partner had a big fight recently.

You leave the house and go down to the store to freshen up.

However, "My wife / husband is an idiot, they don't really love me" pops into your head.

From here you have two options.

You can choose to believe this thought and think about it, sending yourself into a spiral of negativity and false stories.

Or you can choose to redirect your focus and ask yourself a simple question: "Is this true?"

They don't really love you or are they just suffering because they don't feel understood?

Are they really an idiot or are they someone you love who is struggling to overcome obstacles in their own life and take it out on you?

What is the truth?

People often treat negative thoughts as if they are bad or evil.

But I am here to tell you that you need to survive.

In its proper place, negative thinking can save your life, keep your business afloat, and prevent you from marrying the wrong person or divorcing the right one.

However, when you allow false negative thoughts to control your life, you have a problem.

I encourage you to simply witness your thoughts the next time you notice that you are negative. Once you have acknowledged your negativity, simply ask yourself the question "Is this the truth?"

The answer may surprise you.

The Ladders and TechRepublic have published articles listing strong and interesting questions to ask interviewers. In fact, I have two of those items on my hard drive; here is the first one:

These are your questions for the interviewer

Date: October 5, 2010

Author: Toni Bowers

The first few times I interviewed for a job, I found myself speechless when the tables turned and the interviewer asked me if I had any questions.

My silence was due in part to the fact that the question was unexpected. But sometimes I didn't have any questions because I clarified points during the interview and had all my questions.

Keep reading

The Ladders and TechRepublic have published articles listing strong and interesting questions to ask interviewers. In fact, I have two of those items on my hard drive; here is the first one:

These are your questions for the interviewer

Date: October 5, 2010

Author: Toni Bowers

The first few times I interviewed for a job, I found myself speechless when the tables turned and the interviewer asked me if I had any questions.

My silence was due in part to the fact that the question was unexpected. But sometimes I didn't have any questions because I clarified points during the interview and I already had all my questions answered. And, I admit, sometimes I just wanted the interview to end so I could go to my car and breathe again.

But the truth is, interviewers want you to ask questions and they want to see what kind of questions you ask. Here are the types of questions you shouldn't and shouldn't ask:

  • Do not ask about salary, vacation time, employee benefits, time allowed for lunch, etc., in the first interview. Although these areas are totally relevant to the job, you don't want to give the impression that you are primarily concerned with them.
  • Don't ask when you can ditch the job in question and move into an influential position. You may be thinking that, but there is a better way to ask. Ask how success will be measured. Ask the interviewer what he sees you doing in six months or a year if he joins the company. Ask about training or career development opportunities.
  • Be careful that your nerves do not make you ask a question whose answer has already been provided earlier in the interview. There is nothing worse than explaining the history of a company and then having a candidate ask you what exactly the company does. Listen to the interviewer and ask questions about what they are saying.

Here are some more suggested questions:

Can you describe the culture of the company? This is a good way to get to know the company and its employees informally.

What employees and departments will I work with most often? Interviewers appreciate the broader view than just "what will I do?"

What are the strengths and weaknesses of the company? In addition to feeling vindicated by returning this dreaded question to an interviewer, you can also gain interesting information. If the interviewer says that he personally doesn't care about the mandatory participation in the company's bowling league, well, that's it.

What attracted you to this organization? This shows your interest in the interviewer as a person and also implies that you respect that person enough to want their personal opinion. The unspoken meaning is "If someone as cool as you were drawn to this company, I'd be interested to know what."

Describe what a typical day would be like for me. Interviewers will often highlight the duties of a job. You can get a little more information if you have to describe a normal day.

And here is the second article:

10 ridiculously smart questions to ask in a job interview

By Rachel Weingarten, The Ladders, August 1, 2017

In a crowded job market, the last thing you want to be is forgettable. Yet people do it every day with this one mistake: not asking questions in a job interview.

The error is understandable. You've been so busy preparing to answer questions that you forget to show the curiosity that allows interviewers to see what you really want to know. After all, even if each and every one of your answers is flawless and on time, if you don't ask your interviewer a question or two, you risk coming off as generic.

On the other hand, you don't want to ask terrible questions. That is even worse.

Here's how to show the person interviewing you how you are different and why you stand out from the crowd.

Why did you join the company?

Mark Phillips, who runs a major office for Sanford Rose Associates, one of the largest recruiting networks in the US, had a simple question that could be quite complicated. If the interviewer tells you it was for vacation days or benefits, chances are there isn't much below the surface. However, if they inform you about the creativity or integrity of the brand, you know that you are potentially going to work for a winner.

How does this role promote the mission of the company?

Kelly Lavin, chief talent officer for Canvas, the world's first text-based interview platform, suggests you ask this because “While it is important to understand job duties and company culture, determining why a company exists and a role is the same. if not more important. "It will also allow you to better understand if you" align with the mission of the company and will have a sense of purpose in your new role. "

Tell me about your most successful employees. What do they do differently?

Believe it or not, this is almost a trick question for potential employers, Lavin says. "Answering this question will help the candidate understand how a company defines success and what specific behaviors can lead to that success." In one fell swoop, you will find out what success means to this company and how you can best achieve it.

What do you expect someone in this position to accomplish in the first 60 to 90 days?

University of Richmond Career Advisor Anna Young says, "Great candidates start right away, find out how they're expected to get involved, and start contributing to the organization from day one." And in case you're wondering, it's okay to tweak the question for an internship and ask about expectations for the first few weeks.

What, if there is something, in my background does it give you a pause?

Roberta Matuson, president of Matuson Consulting, says this is pretty much the question job seekers should ask themselves in an interview. She says, "By asking this question, you will be able to overcome any objections the interviewer may have before leaving the room." And if you're smart, you can find a way to combat any preconceived notions by addressing them in a follow-up note.

What is the turnover in your company, in the executive suite and in the department for which I am interviewing?

Dave Arnold, president of Arnold Partners, says that as a leading independent CFO search consultant for technology companies, you've had hundreds of people come out to interview clients and think that's a question worth asking. While people no longer expect to stay in a certain job for decades or more, it's good to know how long you can expect to stay if given the opportunity. If the interviewer is uncomfortable or shares the fact that the change in your company is greater than that of Dancing with the Stars, you may want to think twice before accepting the position.

What are the opportunities for growth and advancement?

Young says, "This can help you understand the structure of the organization and whether there are opportunities to move up and advance in your career." It's also a great way to learn about various ways to progress or move into different roles. "Also, it could help you learn if they offer ongoing training or professional development for employees."

If you had the opportunity to re-interview for your company (knowing what you know now), what questions would you ask next time?

Ashley White, executive director of Human Resources for APQC, a member-based nonprofit that produces benchmarks and research best practices, suggested this difficulty.

This one is a bit sneaky because it also allows you to surreptitiously monitor the interviewer's hidden signals. Do they suddenly look uncomfortable before launching the company line? Do you receive this with a giant smile? You may have more answers to this question for what they don't say than even what they share.

What have I not asked most of the candidates?

Phillips also suggested asking this question, which sets him apart right away. On the one hand, you are pooling all the other applicants and showing a confidence level; on the other hand, you are getting information about your potential competitors - they asked this, but it didn't even occur to me.

One last thing: in order not to spend the next few days or weeks with pins and needles, it is always a promising idea to ask the following question.

What are the next steps in this process?

Young says, "If they haven't shared this information yet, it's important to ask about their schedule so you know when you might be notified of a second interview or a possible offer."

What to ask you

Shannon Breuer, president of the Wiley Group, was one of 800 laid off at her previous job. Shannon now draws on her own personal experience to provide clients with career counseling and transition services. She offers a list of questions to ask yourself before an interview and, if necessary, you can flip them over and ask the interviewer.

· What level of work-life balance do you want to enjoy?

· How casual do you like to dress?

· Is your ideal employer a promising small business or a century-old corporation with time-tested values ​​and a clear path for future promotions?

· Do you like the management style of the leadership team?

· What are the company initiatives you can support?

That's what I have on file. You don't have to ask everyone, but asking a few will rank you as a better candidate.

I graduated from the University of Delhi in 2017. After my university, I was looking for better opportunities, although I did not have a stellar profile to apply to large companies, but I did not give up. I believed in myself. For the next two months, I took Linkedin Premium and started looking for better opportunities. I was already tired of being rejected by Tier 1 companies, but I didn't give up.

This answer will be a bit long and if my readers feel they don't read this answer, you guys can skip :).

I've always wanted to work with management consulting firms. Now most of us get it, what am I?

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I graduated from the University of Delhi in 2017. After my university, I was looking for better opportunities, although I did not have a stellar profile to apply to large companies, but I did not give up. I believed in myself. For the next two months, I took Linkedin Premium and started looking for better opportunities. I was already tired of being rejected by Tier 1 companies, but I didn't give up.

This answer will be a bit long and if my readers feel they don't read this answer, you guys can skip :).

I've always wanted to work with management consulting firms. Now most of us get it, what am I talking about? It's holy MBB (McKinsey & Company, Bain & Company & The Boston Consulting group).

It was late at night in August when I saw a notification on my Linkedin profile - "Mckinsey & Company" hiring an operations intern for their new companies. Without much expectation, I applied for the internship. Now if anyone is not aware of this company, let me tell you that it is the best management consulting company in the world and the 10 best places to work according to Forbes. Also, it pays you very well.

After a week, I received an email from the human resources department. The image is as follows:

I freaked out for a moment thinking, it's false. I called the sender's personal number in the email and confirmed it. I was happy and nervous at the same time because I had the opportunity to be interviewed with one of the best consulting firms so far.

The profile was an operations fellow and I first realized that I was going to be asked about some complex operations case studies. I went through all the youtube videos on case studies and estimates. I practiced some of Mckinsey's real-life guesswork and got an idea of ​​all kinds of questions they can ask me. There were three rounds and each round was an elimination round.

The first meeting was at 2:00 pm and I arrived at his office at 1:00 pm wearing my black suit with black shoes. This is how I looked.

I entered their facilities and I got goose bumps when I saw this:

The name says it all.

Let me explain something to you about the interview process. It was divided into three stages.

Round 1: General Introduction About Yourself and Why You Want to Go into the Operations Industry at Mckinsey & Company

Round 2: Everything you did in college so far and tell us something relevant, you may have done it in college, from a competition to winning a competition.

I won't write anything about these two rounds because it would be a waste of my readers time and I don't want to bore my readers, so let's go back to the final round.

Round 3: Technical and problem-solving skills (mainly round of estimations and case studies to check the analytical and problem-solving skills of the candidate).

I went to the last cabin where I was waiting for the global operations analyst. Her name was Nidhi and she was taking my interview.

Suddenly, she walked in.

Me: Hi Nidhi, nice to see you.

N: Hi Shyan, how are you? I received their comments from the gentleman and they were quite satisfied with their interview. Make sure you navigate this well.

Me: I'll do my best, Nidhi. I am fine and nervous at the same time.

N (with a smile): Don't be. Feel relaxed.

So, Shyan, why do you want to be in operations management?

Me: Operations management is the function that converts an organization's resources (materials, labor) into products and services. That is why it is “the main reason for being of any organization.

For those who work in manufacturing, understanding operations is important because it is the area where much of a company's money is made or lost. For those in the service industries, it is important to understand operations as it is a key differentiating factor between companies in the same space. In the case of banks or logistics companies, the value proposition that they offer to consumers is usually based on the functions that the operations department provides.

This is what I learned during my college life and if we could combine these two definitions together, it turns out to be customer service in plain language.

Nidhi seems satisfied with my answer.

N: Okay, so there would be two case studies, one would be a general case study and the other would be an operational case study. We only need your approach for both case studies. We are not concerned with the result here.

Question 1: How are we going to estimate the area of ​​Delhi?

Me: Are you just talking about Delhi or Delhi / NCR?

N: Only Delhi.

Me: I thought for 30 seconds. First, I found out that if we need to calculate the area of ​​something, we need a radius and then we can automatically apply the formula "piR ^ 2 to find the area, but since we need to calculate the area of ​​Delhi, we need to subtract something as well.

So let's assume the Delhi / NCR map looks round and this is how Google maps work ... so I'm not assuming incorrectly.

N: Go ahead.

Me: So, let's take one end of Delhi / NCR - "Jahangir Puri and take another end of Delhi / NCR -" Downtown Huda.

These two points are well connected with metro. So this is basically just a diameter.

Now practically if I have to get to huda city center from jahangirpuri, it takes about 120 minutes.

& metro runs at a speed of about 70 to 80 km / h, excluding all wear and tear, which I assume is not insignificant at the moment.

Distance = Speed ​​* Time.

We know the speed and we know the time (Practically)

Then we can calculate the distance.

but there is a catch as we all know Delhi ends in sultanpur ... so we have to subtract the distance from sultanpur / huda from Jahangirpuri / Huda to get the final distance from Jahangir / Sultanpur which is where Delhi ends.

Now we know the diameter & D / 2 = R.

Put it in a formula and get the estimate.

N (smiling): Well done, Shyan.

Let's go to our final question and it's a real Mckinsey case study.

Pepsico wants to deport one of its plants to Orlando from CA. You have a limited bottleneck and want to take cost optimization in the numbers. Suggest a method to do it in a way that saves Pepsico's cost and labor.

Me: I have no idea what he said: P thinking for a minute.

Entonces, dado que tiene un cuello de botella limitado y quieren tomar la optimización de costos en las cifras ... entonces sería factible que lo llevaran parte por parte a otra ciudad a pesar de tomarlo todo de una vez y obtener algunas ganancias de ellos y nuevamente. utilizando la participación en las ganancias para transportar el resto de su planta a esa ciudad en particular.

N ( Looking confused ) : Don’t you think that it gonna affect their employee’s ? Such companies don’t compromise with their employee’s. You’re trying to shift a percentage of an employee to another city leaving their previous project . You’re spliting them in groups & then you expect this company to make some profits?

How they gonna make some profits?

Me ( Blank Face ) : I understood that I lost the game but still didn’t give up .

Mam,for instance if they deport their employee’s to another city ..they can help the plant to grow & they will get opportunity to work .

N : That’s not what such companies want. They are leaders of the world in the field of FMCG & sales . Why they gonna split their employee’s at first.

Think rationally atleast & I am assuming you can’t

Me : I am sorry mam.

I can’t reach to the conclusion.

N : Shyan,it was simple. There was a catch in the question. You need to work on your vocabulary.

Bottleneck means a glitch in the system. It is not a separate term . The answer was simple but you confused yourself with some fancy methods.

Their employee’s will work together to find this glitch & then transporting their plant bit by bit including all the raw materials & stuffs. Ofcourse,there’s mathematical way to do it but I am assuming , you can’t because you didn’t understand the question.

Thanks for your interview .

We will get back to you.

Verdict : Rejected.

What I have realized from this interview : These type of companies don’t compromise with not even a single mistake & this is the reason for such companies to be great. They pay you well but they expects a lot from you with accuracy & precision.

Perdí mi oportunidad ese día, pero esta entrevista me hizo darme cuenta de que necesito aprender mucho.

Volveré algún día :)

Gracias por leer.

Paz.

Entrevistador: Okey Harshit, déjame hacerte un acertijo ahora. ¿Estás preparado para ello?

Me: Sure sir (with a confident smile, but my heart was beating like hell because you never know if that same riddle could decide your fate).

Interviewer: Suppose you are given 'n' number of eggs and each egg has a threshold value of say 'm', where the threshold is the number of floors in a building after which it will break.

Me: Okay (with a poker face: Wohoooooo !!!! I know this one, this is the famous egg puzzle ... I have you Mr. Interviewer :))

Interviewer: For example, if the eggs have a threshold value of say 10, then th

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Interviewer: Okay Harshit, let me puzzle you now. Are you ready for this?

Me: Sure sir (with a confident smile, but my heart was beating like hell because you never know if that same riddle could decide your fate).

Interviewer: Suppose you are given 'n' number of eggs and each egg has a threshold value of say 'm', where the threshold is the number of floors in a building after which it will break.

Me: Okay (with a poker face: Wohoooooo !!!! I know this one, this is the famous egg puzzle ... I have you Mr. Interviewer :))

Interviewer: For Instance, if the eggs have a threshold value of say 10, then these eggs will not break when thrown from any floor which is <10 and they will break when thrown from all the other floors of the building which are >=10.

Me: Okey (same poker face, in fact with a more confused look so that he feels as if he has asked an amazing puzzle)

Interviewer: So, you have to calculate the minimum number of eggs required to identify their threshold value. Given that there 100 floors in the building.

Me : Ohkeyyy… (Now I was really confused as I was not sure if he had asked the same puzzle or is it just me?? It did not seem like the same puzzle …)

Interviewer : (I got you Harshit …. ;) )

// After a few thoughts and on re-confirming myself that I cannot treat it as the same puzzle..

Me : 1 ( I think I have nailed it ;) )

Interviewer : What?? Can you please explain? (This guy screwed on this last piece of cake )

Me: Sir, I would throw an egg starting from the 1st floor, bring it back and do the same process sequentially until the egg breaks which will determine the threshold value. (I got you Sir :) you forgot to mention in the puzzle that I could not re-use the egg )

// We both had a laugh on this…

Result : Selected.

Although this was not just the reason but the experience was amazing ;)

A good interviewer can be as adept at uncovering factual information (versus postured presentation of selective information) as you are at anything.

I have seen people employ the "stress technique": putting the candidate on the defensive through confrontation, taking them out of their game by not reading the resume, telling them they are not qualified, and I have seen people who are actually just nice be personable and use your interviewing skills, and others somewhere in between. And all can be equally effective at getting the "real" information despite using totally unobtrusive approaches.

Being nice is not the

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A good interviewer can be just as adept at uncovering factual information (as opposed to postulated presentation of selective information) as you are at anything else.

I have seen people employ the "stress technique": putting the candidate on the defensive through confrontation, taking them out of their game by not reading the resume, telling them they are not qualified, and I have seen people who are actually just nice be personable and use your interviewing skills, and others somewhere in between. And all can be equally effective at getting the "real" information despite using totally unobtrusive approaches.

Being nice is not the real strategy for getting interviewees to reveal their real thoughts and experiences; it is incidental, simply a construction of who the interviewer is personally.

Lying. This is a big one. I have shortened the interviews many times because of this. Candidates should never try to cheat in their own way during an interview. "I don't know" is an acceptable answer; in many cases it is exactly what I am looking for. Tell me what is similar to another problem you have solved, tell me how you would go about catching up on the subject, etc. heck, say * anything * that indicates some humility. If I hire you, I hope you start working. Your lack of experience will become painfully apparent, and if you have sold your knowledge excessively, we will have some v

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Lying. This is a big one. I’ve cut interviews short on many occasions for this. Candidates should never try to bluff their way through an interview. “I don’t know” is an acceptable answer; in many cases it’s exactly what I’m looking for. Tell me that it’s similar to another problem that you’ve solved, tell me how you would go about coming up to speed on the subject, etc. heck, say *anything* that indicates some humility. If I hire you, I’ll expect you to hit the ground running. Your lack of experience will become painfully apparent, and if you’ve over sold your knowledge we’ll be having some very uncomfortable conversations.

The entire purpose of the interview is to assess whether the interviewee knows what they claim to know in sufficient detail to become a useful employee.

When the interviewee says something that is false, it is your job to question what they said. Fixing them is pointless unless you never hire them.

The appropriate response, in my opinion, is to ask for more details about why they said what you think is false. It could be from your point of reference, it's true. Explore your assumptions. Who knows, they can both learn something.

But rude? No. Your job is to discover the limits of your

Keep reading

The entire purpose of the interview is to assess whether the interviewee knows what he claims to know in sufficient detail to become a useful employee.

When the interviewee says something that is false, it is your job to question what they said. Fixing them is pointless unless you never hire them.

The appropriate response, in my opinion, is to ask for more details about why they said what you think is false. It could be from your point of reference, it's true. Explore your assumptions. Who knows, they can both learn something.

But rude? No. Your job is to discover the limits of their knowledge and experience.

The textbook answer is “I can be most effective in a coaching environment. I think that approach brings with it, efficient use of my supervisor’s time and my time. It also enables my boss to customize the approach depending on the difficulty and importance of each assignment.”

It avoids any mention of negatives, such as micro-management, and it inherently respects the importance of my boss’s time.

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