How do I apply for a job on a company website?

Updated on : January 21, 2022 by Kallie Cox



How do I apply for a job on a company website?

Visit the company website and navigate to the careers section. Once you find the relevant opening, proceed with the application according to the instructions on the site.

The success of applying for a job through a website really depends on your relationships. If you have no relationship or contact with the company you are applying for, you should know that your chances of success are likely not very good.

It doesn't really matter if you use a company website, Linkedin, or a popular job board. If you don't have an internal contact or relationship with someone in the place you're trying to work for, then your resume or application will stack with everyone else.

The problem of unrelated online job applications

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The success of applying for a job through a website really depends on your relationships. If you have no relationship or contact with the company you are applying for, you should know that your chances of success are likely not very good.

It doesn't really matter if you use a company website, Linkedin, or a popular job board. If you don't have an internal contact or relationship with someone in the place you're trying to work for, then your resume or application will stack with everyone else.

The problem with online job applications without a relationship with a company is the application process. It is literally a black hole in many cases. This is partly due to the number of job candidates applying for each position, which is estimated to be around 250. Of the 250 applying for a position, only 4-6 would be able to get an interview.

The online job application process pops up as it has helped make job application much easier. However, the reality is that technology has made it much more difficult in many cases to find a good quality job. This is why LinkedIn claims that there is only a 1.2% chance of landing a job through an online application.

Technology has made it much easier to apply for a job and see what vacancies might be available. The Internet has played an important role in this. However, it is likely that additional technology, such as the use of an applicant tracking system, has more than helped the job seeker.

If you are not familiar with ATS (Applicant Tracking Systems) systems, this is software that is designed to search through online applications based on keywords and any additional criteria requested by the person using the system.

Candidate tracking systems are often explained as a way for companies to find the most qualified candidate, but they often do just the opposite. Truly qualified job candidates can easily be filtered out due to not having the correct keywords.

Online job applications and ATS systems can also be used to discriminate based on age or gender. Although discrimination in the workplace is supposedly illegal, it happens every day. Dates of employment or education can be used to get an idea of ​​a person's age. Names can be used to find out the sex of an applicant.

ATS systems are often used as a way to show that a company is not using discriminatory practices to hire. However, the software is only as good as the criteria and programming used. There are instances of ATS systems circumnavigating their intended purpose of nondiscrimination in the hiring process.

The bottom line is that if you are looking for a job, do an online search. It should be part of the job seekers' practice. However, don't make it the center of your job search. Spend most of your time networking and building relationships with people where you may want to be hired. This will give you the best chance of success. It will not apply to an online job through a company website, Linkedin, or a popular job board.

As a note to readers, I write about money and life. Spending several years in the financial world, I have learned that there is no general answer when it comes to finances. If the topic is about money and life or questioning the supposed experts, I write about it. There is also a podcast that can be heard on Podbean and Apple Podcasts. If you like the answer to this question, a positive vote is always good.

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I had an amazing experience with Hired.com.

My resume shows "Java, C ++, REST, React, Angular, Linux, SQL, NoSQL, RTOS, IoT, full stack, front-end, back-end, big data, cloud, saas, cloud, web development, financial , tansactional "followed by several etceteras. Also over 10 years as a software developer in the Bay Area, as well as a Master of Physics and a Berkeley degree.

I am actively looking for what I hope is the right position. I'm active on LinkedIn and Dice and a few other recruiting portals and I get 100+ emails a day, 40+ phone calls a day, too many text messages, and somehow

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I had an amazing experience with Hired.com.

My resume shows "Java, C ++, REST, React, Angular, Linux, SQL, NoSQL, RTOS, IoT, full stack, front-end, back-end, big data, cloud, saas, cloud, web development, financial , tansactional "followed by several etceteras. Also over 10 years as a software developer in the Bay Area, as well as a Master of Physics and a Berkeley degree.

I am actively looking for what I hope is the right position. I am active on LinkedIn and Dice and a few other recruiting portals and I get over 100 emails a day, over 40 phone calls a day, way too many text messages and somehow I get pages too.

This is not because I am great at what I do. Rather it is because I am competent and have intentionally built a wide range of experience that will keep me marketable. In my most recent experience, it is precisely because there is a breadth of my skill set that has been demonstrated - my skills are in high demand.

However, when I asked Hired why my profile "will not be visible to employers until we determine that there is a larger pool of jobs for your skill set," I received the following response:

"Thank you for contacting us.

So Hired is a closed and selected marketplace that meets the needs of your selected companies. What is demanded at Hired reflects the needs of our companies only as opposed to the needs of companies in the overall job market.

As a result, certain languages ​​and specialties are in high demand on Hired, while others are not or fluctuate (again, this does not reflect the broader market). Right now, we don't see any demand for C ++, Java, IOT, and the like. Rather, our companies are currently using Hired to find SEs with over 2 years of full-time experience in specific Ruby, Rails, and Python roles.

However, this is subject to change. I might encourage you to come back and resubmit your profile a little later in, say, 3-6 months. Hopefully we'll see an increase in demand for your languages ​​at that time and then we can help you get there. "

Am I wrong to infer that Hired has very few customers? If I'm wrong, why would they choose to be specific to Ruby, Rails, and Python?

I have my theories on what leads to this impotence, but that's it. I would really like to know more from those who understand what is going on in this company.

Low.

If you do things like everyone else.

Remember this at least: LinkedIn is a tool that helps you connect with a decision maker.

It is not a substitute for a meeting where you show a hiring manager how you can benefit your company.

LinkedIn gets you to the door. You still have to go through it.

Here's what I did on LinkedIn to get 20+ interviews and find a great job.

  1. Make sure your profile is All-Star level. This means uploading a great image, writing a compelling headline, and crafting a benefits-based summary. Don't tell potential employers what you do, tell them how you can benefit
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Low.

If you do things like everyone else.

Remember this at least: LinkedIn is a tool that helps you connect with a decision maker.

It is not a substitute for a meeting where you show a hiring manager how you can benefit your company.

LinkedIn gets you to the door. You still have to go through it.

Here's what I did on LinkedIn to get 20+ interviews and find a great job.

  1. Make sure your profile is All-Star level. This means uploading a great image, writing a compelling headline, and crafting a benefits-based summary. Don't tell potential employers what you do, tell them how it can benefit them.
  2. Identify the companies you want to work with. Use multiple sites to do this ... LinkedIn jobs, in fact ZipRecruiter were all I used.
  3. Locate the hiring manager by searching on Linkedin.
  4. If you can't find the hiring manager, find a decision maker. A vice president, director or regional manager will suffice. I looked for a VP of Sales or a Regional Manager during my job search. If it were a smaller company, it would go directly to the CEO or the president.
  5. Invite that person to connect with a personal message. “Hi Mike, we have several mutual connections in the auto industry. I'd like to add you to my LinkedIn network. "
  6. Once they connect with you, send them a message directly. Tell them you are interested in a position at their company and why you think it may be an asset. Ask them who you can send a resume to so you don't get lost among applicants. Most of the time they will point the person to you or ask you to send it to them and forward it. Either one is a great victory.
  7. Do this for every job that interests you. Not all will respond. They don't have to. You only need one. Be professionally persistent. You'll get multiple job interviews and stand out from almost all candidates for being proactive.
  8. Keep doing this until you get the job you want. Perseverance is key. Most people will not be persistent professionally. If so, you will get the job.

Analysts:

Do not get interviews, cover letter, or resume from the suspect.

  • Errors in the curriculum
  • The writing resumes with too much arrogance
  • Resume too weak
  • Overqualified for the position (neurosurgeon who wants to be a janitor).
  • To many holes or jumps (works like ... from January to February, to ... from February to April, A ... from May to July. ← works if seasonal fruits are picked, etc.
    • Message sent: in 2 months of training they are likely to abandon us.
    • Or take a year off here and there: what do you hide to work those months?
  • It could also be a flooded market (1 job, 200 applications. A 1 in 200 bet.

Also consider what

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Analysts:

Do not get interviews, cover letter, or resume from the suspect.

  • Errors in the curriculum
  • The writing resumes with too much arrogance
  • Resume too weak
  • Overqualified for the position (neurosurgeon who wants to be a janitor).
  • To many holes or jumps (works like ... from January to February, to ... from February to April, A ... from May to July. ← works if seasonal fruits are picked, etc.
    • Message sent: in 2 months of training they are likely to abandon us.
    • Or take a year off here and there: what do you hide to work those months?
  • It could also be a flooded market (1 job, 200 applications. A 1 in 200 bet.

Also consider what you think a person wants for the job versus what management looks for may differ.

One filmmaker told me that to hire him he would see thousands of "demo reels" of what one person can do. Most had pistols fired from their shoulders, etc.

The hired person simply panned for 30 seconds across a railroad track. He then animated a train flying through the same pan for 30 seconds.

He was hired because the project required someone who could compose real life and 3D animation (shadow matching, etc.) to do special effects.

Lesson: Research WHY you want to work there. How your skills fit, how the values ​​fit, how you can solve your problems, etc. It's even good for a quick and easy cover letter.

Some people I called for BLEW IT interviews on the call to invite them in. How? Like this…

"I'm calling you from XYZ Corp. Are you free for an interview?" his answer: “WHO is XYZ Corp? I have distributed hundreds of resumes! ”.

The thought I had was that this person is desperate for a job ... ANY job. They wouldn't love the job, the "pick a job." Any type of work will be OUT!

If a second interview came along and did some research that said they can offer XYZ and they know they'll love it here (who did you hire? In the people's seat that goes).

If you got interviews and no offers, there would be some performance issues during your interview (another post topic).

Good luck!

Ok then, generally "no".

However, many of those groups of resumes that are collected are analyzed by a computer and sorted according to the matching phrases in the resume. So it doesn't HURT to ask for them, and you may occasionally get your resume randomly by an HR person if you use buzzwords on your resume. Then you need to make it easily scannable in 10 seconds (because if it doesn't catch your eye in 10 seconds, they are launching it).

But it's ridiculously irresponsible to bet on that. You must have a LinkedIn profile that is updated and active that you take advantage of with recruiters and contact

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Ok then, generally "no".

However, many of those groups of resumes that are collected are analyzed by a computer and sorted according to the matching phrases in the resume. So it doesn't HURT to ask for them, and you may occasionally get your resume randomly by an HR person if you use buzzwords on your resume. Then you need to make it easily scannable in 10 seconds (because if it doesn't catch your eye in 10 seconds, they are launching it).

But it's ridiculously irresponsible to bet on that. You should have an up-to-date and active LinkedIn profile that you leverage with recruiters and contacts. You should also mention to your friends and co-workers that you are looking for (if you don't say anything about your job search, how in the world do you expect to get referrals?).

You should also do a lot of research on the hiring manager's emails. Look for guides on this. You practically stalk them all over the internet, oddly enough. Because you need information before you send them an email. If you send them a cold-stored email, they'll likely delete it right away. You need to know WHAT THEY ARE LOOKING FOR, or at least be able to tailor your email directly to the position and needs of the manager. Some people call this a "pain card." Find out how to write one.

Lastly, the “resume” you email to the contacts you get (whether it's on your own, through friends, or social media) should probably not be the same as the one you send to sites. Also, whenever you are submitted to a site, you should try to do your best to speak to someone to have your resume manually reviewed.

There are people who never have a problem finding work. The reason is because they know how to look and are not shy about it. I'd say you have some homework to do. Do it! Applying without networking is a fool's game and will give you a fool's salary and career options. You deserve more than that.

When I started looking for work about 6 months ago, I realized that I had not been looking for work in 13 years.

My entire career had been developed through networking, the old school "I know this guy" kind of thing.

Since my days in England in 2006, where I worked menial jobs in the * ehem * pleasant environment of Middlesbrough, I found all my jobs through abstentions or friends.

"But again friend, why the hell did you come to Middlesbrough?"

I had a LinkedIn profile but it wasn't really up to date. I asked Google how to set it up to beat "the noise". I read a couple of blog posts that I found quite insig

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When I started looking for work about 6 months ago, I realized that I had not been looking for work in 13 years.

My entire career had been developed through networking, the old school "I know this guy" kind of thing.

Since my days in England in 2006, where I worked menial jobs in the * ehem * pleasant environment of Middlesbrough, I found all my jobs through abstentions or friends.

"But again friend, why the hell did you come to Middlesbrough?"

I had a LinkedIn profile but it wasn't really up to date. I asked Google how to set it up to beat "the noise". I read a couple of blog posts that I found quite revealing and with that knowledge I went to work on my rebrand.

Serial entrepreneur | CEO of V&X Partners | Advisor in 47 tips | NYT Bestseller Author | 12-time Kona Ironman winner | Father of 3. My mother is my hero, she inspired me to make the world a better place "

The results were amazing, all the recruiters started contacting me. I was surprised to see that I was getting messages from a couple of recruiter posts a week on LinkedIn, I'm the hottest thing on the market right?

Up to that point, the times I had sent CVs to a company, I had never received a single reply.

-Of course, please, leave your CV right here! We will contact you very soon.

Let alone be proactively contacted by them, that was crazy, what have I been doing without a LinkedIn profile all this time? Curse! LinkedIn even contacted me to go work for them in Dublin at their European headquarters! Xavi, can you believe it? From shit from Figueres to Dublin, you're a star!

-Come for Xavi, just like Barcelona but with better salaries!

LinkedIn is really helpful in job search terms because it puts the candidate center stage. It has changed the game substantially compared to other sites. Being a social network, its aim is to make a much better version of a CV, a dynamic CV that is not difficult to read and that all interested parties can search for.

I know, it depends on the industry.

My wife, who is an architect, hasn't even bothered to learn the name, Lingewhat ?? Xavi, be careful with these shady sites that you use ...

but anyway, soon everyone will be there.

CEO in the Vatican | International Speaker | I am also a banker

What happens is that on LinkedIn you have people actively searching for you (or the keywords you appear for), while the other sites depend on you submitting your CV over and over again.

Your market is a well-oiled machine, it serves both the job seeker and the recruiter. The other sites may have a deeper job board (Infojobs), or better search (Indeed) or niche offerings (angel.co), but LinkedIn has it all in increasing numbers (Network effect, anyone?).

I promise, this is not an ad disguised as content. I know LinkedIn has its problems, but do we have to start with your competitors' problems?

To this day, it is not even a competition. It is very useful and will be for the moment.

Not even Microsoft will screw it up.

-Hehe good Xavi, but nobody told you that now we are fine ...

In my opinion, LinkedIn can be really good for talent seekers first and job seekers last.

There are many recruiters, talent search agents, etc. who use LinkedIn regularly to fill in the gap for proposals for potential clients (recruitment companies. Similarly, much of the human resources staff in large companies use LinkedIn to screen potential candidates).

  • There are some recruiters who use LinkedIn extremely well by reviewing member profiles and preparing professional inquiries for potential candidates.
  • But for every good recruiter, in my experience, there are 5 inexperienced (I won't use the word bad yet) who d
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In my opinion, LinkedIn can be really good for talent seekers first and job seekers last.

There are many recruiters, talent search agents, etc. who use LinkedIn regularly to fill in the gap for proposals for potential clients (recruitment companies. Similarly, much of the human resources staff in large companies use LinkedIn to screen potential candidates).

  • There are some recruiters who use LinkedIn extremely well by reviewing member profiles and preparing professional inquiries for potential candidates.
  • But for every good recruiter, in my experience, there are 5 inexperienced (I won't use the word bad just yet) who don't do their due diligence; these people are at the bottom of the food chain here.
  • These good recruiters are looking for the important, executive, and high-level positions, usually 6-figure salaries ($) because this is where the money is.
    • I bet the candidates who attract these recruiters ALWAYS have significant experience with 10 or more years and often management positions already and are probably not looking for work.

As an intern starting at the bottom rung with a good profile (yours is good, by the way) you need to be very proactive in your job search as you likely won't attract those really good professional recruiters for entry level positions. or personnel.

  • If applicable, use LinkedIn to apply directly to companies offering opportunities.
  • Write a resume, based on your LinkedIn profile, if you haven't already
  • After applying online through a LinkedIn opportunity, send a great cover letter with your resume to the company's recruiter and don't forget to follow up to get that interview.
  • Don't get too excited about the recruiters you connect with via LinkedIn, as I said many of them are inexperienced.
  • Consider contacting a recruiting agency outside of LinkedIn that places staff in your field and puts these people to work for you; they can help you with your resume.

Good luck, by the way, you don't need to put a message on your profile that you are looking for an opportunity; Just my opinion, if a recruiter matches you through your profile, you may have given up a bargaining chip when the discussion turns to salary negotiation

BEST OF LUCK! It seems that you will be a good option for some company.

If you were younger and looking for work, you would probably look for a route specifically designed for that purpose, such as Indeed or similar services.

I could write an entire book on dealing with recruiters and HR managers, but here's a little detail. I saw two job postings posted on Linkedin, one from a junior staff member for a local small business and one from the Head of Talent Acquisition for the entire APAC region for a global brand.

I emailed them and they both responded politely with a standard: "Visit our website and apply through our job portal."

After visiting dozens of websites and going through tedious job portals and registration processes in the weeks leading up to those emails, with no real result, I read both messages.

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I could write an entire book on dealing with recruiters and HR managers, but here's a little detail. I saw two job postings posted on Linkedin, one from a junior staff member for a local small business and one from the Head of Talent Acquisition for the entire APAC region for a global brand.

I emailed them and they both responded politely with a standard: "Visit our website and apply through our job portal."

After visiting dozens of websites and going through tedious job portals and registration processes in the weeks leading up to those emails, with no real result, I read both messages and said to myself "shit this."

Then I took a deep breath and wrote to both of them saying, "Thank you so much for your response! It's great that they have a job portal, but I think they are extremely impersonal and rarely lead anywhere. In my experience, most Los Better employees have always been hired as a result of meeting them in person. Instead of sending you my CV, can I ask if I can meet you in person, even if it's just for a 5 minute conversation? Interesting stories to tell you about * insert the company name here * and no amount of education / experience on a sheet of paper will be able to do that for you "

The junior staff member did not respond (and probably blocked me), but the senior responded by saying:

"You're absolutely right. I was quite surprised by your message, but in a good way. I'd love to meet you, are you free tomorrow?"

:)

There are two ways to get a job as a new hire at any company.

  1. Through the recruitment campaign: find out which companies are running a recruitment campaign. Some companies also call you walk-ins. Put a notification from Google on your mobile. Therefore, any company that opens a recruiting campaign will appear in your search feed. Attend these units and see if you can crack any of them to get a job.
  2. Through a referral - Get in touch with your friends and family who may already be working for a company you want to work for. Ask them to help you find a job for you at their company. Don't be disappointed yeah
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There are two ways to get a job as a new hire at any company.

  1. Through the recruitment campaign: find out which companies are running a recruitment campaign. Some companies also call you walk-ins. Put a notification from Google on your mobile. Therefore, any company that opens a recruiting campaign will appear in your search feed. Attend these units and see if you can crack any of them to get a job.
  2. Through a referral - Get in touch with your friends and family who may already be working for a company you want to work for. Ask them to help you find a job for you at their company. Don't be disappointed if you don't get a job from a referral. Keep talking to your references so that when there is an opening they can help you.

These are the two ways to find a like-new job. Make sure you do a proper analysis of your skills to join the right company. You should only join a place where you know you can do the job well.

Stay focused. Stay rich.

Why choose? Do both. Apply through the website and contact the recruiter. Unless you are an independent recruiter. If you are contacted by an independent recruiter and then go directly to the company's website and apply for the same job, you can prevent them from getting it. It would save the company recruiter fees, but legitimate companies don't bankrupt their recruiters and would likely disqualify you from working there. Any company that hired you knowing they screwed up the recruiter might not be a place you'd like to work.

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