How difficult is it to find a job? And what makes it difficult?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Corey Davies



How difficult is it to find a job? And what makes it difficult?

After speaking with thousands of hiring managers and tens of thousands of candidates, I realized that both parties have one thing in common: they hate the hiring process.

So, a little over a year ago, I set out to understand why.

After falling into the den of a $ 464 billion industry, I found an answer: The recruitment industry has been incentivized to help companies fill positions, rather than help people find jobs.

Why? Because it is easier to make money with companies.

Since companies are paying the bills, everything revolves around making them happy. So it's easy to see why a

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After speaking with thousands of hiring managers and tens of thousands of candidates, I realized that both parties have one thing in common: they hate the hiring process.

So, a little over a year ago, I set out to understand why.

After falling into the den of a $ 464 billion industry, I found an answer: The recruitment industry has been incentivized to help companies fill positions, rather than help people find jobs.

Why? Because it is easier to make money with companies.

Since companies are paying the bills, everything revolves around making them happy. Therefore, it is easy to see why it takes a candidate six months to get the same job that a company fills in 36 days; there is no incentive for hiring solutions to help candidates.

That unfair practice makes the industry appear one-sided. But if you dig deeper, you will see that it really is a lose-lose situation. Thirty-three percent of new hires fail after six months, simply because no solution focuses on understanding where candidates will do their best work in the long run. Unsurprisingly, this billing costs companies billions of dollars and hundreds of hours.

It is clear that the recruiting system is broken for everyone, but no one talks about what is really causing all the problems. I want to start that conversation and share the issues I noticed that clearly show why you are ready for a change.

Outside recruiters who "serve" candidates are encouraged to neglect the majority of applicants.

Most candidates think it is a great idea to use external recruiters because the services are free. What they don't realize is that these recruiters are incentivized to serve a very specific group of people in a very systematic way.

Outside recruiters earn money by successfully filling a job opening for a company. Once the position is filled, the company typically pays the recruiter between 20% and 30% of the annual salary of the person it hires. Of course, this commission incentivizes outside recruiters to work with high-level candidates. And they have two main motivations for doing it:

  1. Recruiters make much more money with a senior candidate earning a salary of $ 200,000 than an entry-level candidate (the majority) earning a salary of $ 50,000.
  2. It is easier to place senior candidates who already have an excellent resume and applicable experience.

Unfortunately, this means that external recruiters pay extra attention to experienced senior candidates, while less experienced candidates, who really need help, end up being misled and left on their own for months and months.

And when recruiters fail, many candidates turn to what they perceive as the next best thing: job boards.

Job boards are encouraged to accumulate resumes without considering candidates or companies.

A job board is a service that houses vacancies and generates income by promising companies a large number of candidates for each one.

To find candidates, they offer candidates useful features such as the "one-click" application. And while job boards claim this helps candidates save time, the real incentive behind the role is to make it as easy as possible for companies to receive a large pool of candidates for a single position. Then job boards re-monetize by promising to narrow down large groups of applicants to a short list of the "best" resumes.

This process is just another lose-lose for candidates and companies. Because if 300 candidates run for just one job, 290 of them will never hear a peep about it. Not only do candidates have to deal with a demoralizing job search experience, but companies have to pay thousands of dollars to sift through irrelevant resumes.

Even when candidates do arrive for an interview, it may not be for a position in which they can truly thrive. Because, unfortunately, they are being evaluated by means of a curriculum.

A resume, the most popular but least efficient tool, encourages candidates to tinker with the system.

The other day, an internal recruiter told me that in the last month, he reviewed 1,000 resumes, interviewed 30 candidates, and hired 10 people. That's a 3% interview rate and a 0.5% hire rate.

No one can seriously say that it is an efficient system.

Due to the large volume of applicants for each position, companies rely on algorithms to filter resumes that do not meet certain criteria. But everyone knows by now. It's common knowledge that candidates must match their resumes with the keywords in the job description if they want to get past recruiting "filters." Unsurprisingly, that approach incentivizes nearly 50% of people to include inaccurate data on resumes as candidates struggle to get a foot in the door.

Of course, inaccurate data causes problems for companies that rely on resumes to evaluate candidates. Because even if candidates have optimized their resumes and appear to be the best recruits, they cannot always explain why they are what the company is really looking for. And that's valuable time wasted for both parties.

To stop the cycle of harmful incentives, candidates must be supported.

After six months of job hunting, it's no wonder candidates start thinking, "I'll take what I can get." Rent has to be paid somehow, right? But by settling for a job, people continue to be sucked into a vicious cycle of job change because they are using the same broken system, driven by the same bad incentives, to do so.

Rather than encouraging this cycle, the recruiting industry must recognize that people are struggling to find the right jobs because the company has taken precedence over the person.

When people come first, the system focuses on the person looking for a job, not just the company looking to fill a position. Your goal is to understand a candidate's true work behaviors and direct them to a job where they can do their best work in the long run. That's why our team at Edvo constantly asks, "What kind of role would this person thrive in? What job would lead to a successful career and lower turnover?"

By changing the strategy to focus on people, recruiting can bring both sides to the table and stop the suffering. Because unchanged, the vicious job search cycle will continue to perpetuate itself and harm the people who depend on it for their livelihoods.

If you need help getting through a layoff, a rescinded offer, or other job search challenges during this time, feel free to visit https://edvo.com for guides and tools.

The commodification of jobs and the rise of hiring technology has fundamentally changed the way people are hired. For someone to land a semi-competitive job, the candidate must have one of three things:

1. They are applying for a job where they already have experience in the exact position

2. They have an incredibly unique combination of skills or experiences that are well suited to solving a unique and difficult problem.

3. They have the name of a prestigious business university on their resume

Let's analyze the implications of commodification and technology:

Many highly wanted ent

Keep reading

The commodification of jobs and the rise of hiring technology has fundamentally changed the way people are hired. For someone to land a semi-competitive job, the candidate must have one of three things:

1. They are applying for a job where they already have experience in the exact position

2. They have an incredibly unique combination of skills or experiences that are well suited to solving a unique and difficult problem.

3. They have the name of a prestigious business university on their resume

Let's analyze the implications of commodification and technology:

Many highly sought after entry-level jobs are competitive and difficult to obtain because universities produce tens of thousands of graduates with nearly identical qualifications. Junior level positions that only require a few years of experience face this same problem as junior level work has become more basic (e.g. everyone has Excel skills, can put together a presentation, do data entry , etc.).

As a hiring manager, you have hundreds of similar candidates, so you find the easiest / safest way to find someone which is to look at the prestige of the school they attended and the companies they have previously worked for. It's an easy filtering mechanism because it assumes those other organizations have already done the hard work of sifting through it.

ATS - stands for Candidate Tracking System and is a type of software that many large companies rely on to automatically screen candidates. If your applications do not meet the requirements established in these systems, it will not be possible for a human to review it. Because technology has taken the friction out of applying for jobs en masse and has allowed thousands of people to apply in minutes, ATS systems have been created to counter the sheer number of applications coming in.

Do you know where it is not difficult to find work? Minimum wage jobs in retail, fast food, and the gig economy (Uber, Lyft, etc.) that don't require a degree. This is because all of these jobs have been completely standardized so that almost anyone can perform them. People are the gadgets and they have become the merchandise. Because they are so replaceable, you don't need to pay them high salaries.

If you are struggling to get a job, take a moment to see how commodification is impacting the industry and the role you are applying for. Does your profile exactly match the position? Are there thousands of people applying who probably have very similar skills and experiences?

My advice to anyone preparing to succeed in today's world is to focus on differentiating yourself. Accept projects that no one else is doing. Try new things and create unique stories for yourself. Have a foundation of some reputable brands to give you credibility before taking big leaps.

That is the strategy that I have adopted for the last ten years and it has opened many doors for me. As a small-town Chinese boy in South Carolina, my curiosity and desire to pursue different career paths in consulting, finance, and marketing have inadvertently created a differentiated story that helps me stand out in my job search. He got into competitive roles as a strategy on Twitter, allowed me to create my own company jobs, and allowed me to get hired only after a month of job hunting amid COVID.

Understand the current job market and don't be a widget if you want the job.

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