How difficult is it for an Indian to settle in Japan?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Eloise Williams



How difficult is it for an Indian to settle in Japan?

Hello everyone,

I have stayed in Japan for quite some time (already 6 years).

I am going to write honest things about Japan based on my 6 years of experience (3 years PhD + 3 years Postdo) as it will help all Indian students who are planning to come to Japan in the future for research or study purposes.

My intention is not to go against the thoughts or feelings of an individual person. I hope readers take it positively.

I noticed that most of the comments written on Quora are superficial due to their short experience in this country. The most reliable and honest blog is written.

Keep reading

Hello everyone,

I have stayed in Japan for quite some time (already 6 years).

I am going to write honest things about Japan based on my 6 years of experience (3 years PhD + 3 years Postdo) as it will help all Indian students who are planning to come to Japan in the future for research or study purposes.

My intention is not to go against the thoughts or feelings of an individual person. I hope readers take it positively.

I noticed that most of the comments written on Quora are superficial due to their short experience in this country. The most trustworthy and honest blog written by Mr. Manish Mirani is very true about Japan.

Undoubtedly, there are many good things in Japan, as they are described by all, such as safety, cleanliness, good quality of products, healthy food, infrastructure, etc., but it should never be forgotten that the fact that the external appearance is beautiful It does not define the reality behind it and always remember that there are bad people all over the world.

Being an Indian scientist in a homogeneous Japanese society dominated by men is nothing short of a nightmare. At first when I started my PhD, I was also like other Indians, "My God, this is a very beautiful and pleasant country and this is a true paradise on earth", but this feeling did not last more than a year and soon I began to give myself Realize that there is nothing like a paradise in this country and I was wrong to choose this country.

My overall PhD experience was bad, but not worse, and anyway I managed to get my degree and also got a post-doctorate at a good Japanese university (second mistake and very big mistake of mine, just because of the global misconception that Japanese they are very friendly and honest). My postdoctoral experience is beyond imagination, what I am about to write is very difficult to believe about the Japanese scientific society …….

I didn't know much about Japanese work culture when I started my postdoc, and I used to blindly believe in the Japanese. Just after a month of joining, my team leader started torturing me. He used me like a machine and humiliated me almost every day. Later I will write the words that he used for our country, India, and for me. Initially, I didn't understand his intention behind everything and it put me in a situation where I was so afraid to talk to other people within the lab. I was so depressed, my body and soul were completely shattered that it was almost impossible to understand what was happening to me. I used to cry every night after returning home. It was difficult to explain the whole situation to my parents in India. Honestly speaking,

He did not allow me to take a single holiday during the first year of my post-doctorate, nor a national holiday, nor a weekend, nothing. I worked more than 14 hours every day just for his projects. He completely ignored my project and used me to finish his own projects. I was like a robot to him and every time the head teacher asked him about my project, his answer was that his techniques were very bad, so it was taking time to get the results.

After a year, little by little I started talking to other foreign people inside the lab (not Japanese, never make this mistake) and I got some confidence to protest against him. I remember when I asked him for the first time (after 1 year) about my project, his answer was ...

You cannot ask me a direct question, you are a woman and I am your boss, just follow my order without asking me any questions. He said that you Indians come to Japan only for money, you are receiving a salary that is sufficient and you should not worry about the project …… (Of course you do !!).

At the same time, when he realized that he was talking to other people inside the laboratory, he felt insecure and feared something and said….

Your behavior is not like that of a Japanese woman (shy and kawaii type) and you are a person without character (because 2 of my foreign friends are men) ... we consider Japanese society as a developed society and can you imagine that a Japanese man can you say that? talking to a colleague means you have no character.

Also, when I kept protesting, his response was ...

You belong to a poor and developing country and you don't have the ability to become a scientist in Japan and you should go back to your country (it was as if I used you for 2 years, you have finished my 3 projects and now it is more please politely get lost because now you're troublesome to our society).

The most shocking thing happened when my boss called me inside his office (just after having a meeting with my team leader) and told me that you have finished 2 years but you don't have any positive data, I give you a salary and I dropped that. I'm wasting my money and you should give up science. After hearing these words, I lost control and told him everything about 2 years and why my project failed. He didn't say anything to him and after 2 days he asked me to change teams and start a new project from scratch.

You recently posted a research article on the job I finished in 2 years. Removed my name from authorship (initially added in second position) and added the name of a Japanese master student who joined the lab before 6 months. When I asked the leader and boss about it, they said that you have now changed teams, so you have no right to become the author of this article.

The lucky thing is that the leader of my current team is better and supports me. But, I am going to finish my third year of postdoc and I don't have any conference or magazine publications. I cannot take any action because a woman is never supported in Japanese society. Finally, I have decided to leave this country after losing 3 precious years of my career.

I'm really sorry if my comments about Japan hurt someone. I have shared all my experience just to tell the reality of Japanese society, especially its attitude towards women. My goal is not to hurt anyone's feelings. It is important to tell the truth for the career sake of Indian students who come to Japan with big dreams in their eyes.

Not everyone is bad, if you are lucky, you can find a good place to study or work. My message to everyone is to be careful and don't blindly trust Japanese like I did. Eliminate the misconception from your mind that the Japanese are very honest and loyal, before coming to this country.

Thanks.

Long answer, sorry.

This is a difficult question, everyone's experience is different.

I came here first working with a reputable company, I already knew a lot of people and the language.

I help Indians, Pakistanis and Bangladeshis with problems with the police or the government. (Indians are few in my area).

Basically it is very difficult without the language, it can feel very lonely, making Japanese friends is difficult, people are not very helpful when it comes to Asians (white is different).

If you are in a town in India, Tokyo or Kobe, there is an organization for India. Embassy is not helpful either.

My per

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Long answer, sorry.

This is a difficult question, everyone's experience is different.

I came here first working with a reputable company, I already knew a lot of people and the language.

I help Indians, Pakistanis and Bangladeshis with problems with the police or the government. (Indians are few in my area).

Basically it is very difficult without the language, it can feel very lonely, making Japanese friends is difficult, people are not very helpful when it comes to Asians (white is different).

If you are in a town in India, Tokyo or Kobe, there is an organization for India. Embassy is not helpful either.

My personal experience, (my husband is Japanese) I have an advantage.

The food took a long time to get used to, there is practically no vegetarian, most things are cooked in fish broth, which smells bad, I still have trouble eating in Japanese restaurants, because of the smell.

Although I have friends, I am helpful, they are not. Unlike us Indians, they don't just drop everything and help someone. Example: the Japanese do not think twice to call me at night to pick them up at the station, I know I can not call them. Better have a foreign friend, in this case.

The city office or the police are good.

Nothing is fun, it can be boring especially if you don't drink.

Family you can't trust either.

But everything is peaceful, timely, clean and safe.

You spend as much as you earn, things are expensive, saving is difficult.

Medicines are expensive, without insurance it is better not to get sick or hurt.

An Indian man of strange origin came to my area, he encountered an accident that he himself caused. (They called me to interpret. I am a volunteer from the city). His operation cost him 400,000 yen. (about $ 4,000), I didn't have insurance. I do not know what happened. Hopefully he'll get a job or they'll arrest him.

Things can be good or bad.

If you have backup, it will be good.

I stayed there for a year and I must say that it would be a wonderful experience for you, if you could make some adjustments.
1. First of all, very few Japanese are fluent in English, so sometimes you have to change the way you speak English. You must divide your sentences into words, speak slowly so that they can understand. It will be even better if you can learn some Japanese words and greetings.

2. The second is food. No matter where we belong, in India we love spices. And Japanese cuisine has most of the items that are served raw or simply boiled, served with miso soup. So one has

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I stayed there for a year and I must say that it would be a wonderful experience for you, if you could make some adjustments.
1. First of all, very few Japanese are fluent in English, so sometimes you have to change the way you speak English. You must divide your sentences into words, speak slowly so that they can understand. It will be even better if you can learn some Japanese words and greetings.

2. The second is food. No matter where we belong, in India we love spices. And Japanese cuisine has most of the items that are served raw or simply boiled, served with miso soup. So you have to really adjust your taste buds. Tea means oolong tea and coffee means black coffee by default. They are very health conscious so they rarely add sugar to it. And if you are vegan, you have to cook your meals yourself.

3. Regarding behavior, you do have to be punctual, 9 am means 9 am here and not 9:10. Decency and respectful attitude is something you will find in every individual. You will be common in bowing since here not only says good morning, thank you, sorry, etc. It is also complemented by a gesture of reverence. Speak slowly while traveling in a group on any public transport.

4. You will rarely lose your belongings here, as the Japanese are honest to the core. You will not feel any insecurity even while wandering alone at midnight on the roads, even if you are a woman.

5. The Japanese are workaholics, so it can be difficult for them to match their hard work. Most of them are introverts and they respect your privacy and expect the same. You may find it difficult to make friends there. They rarely express their feelings, so you never know that they are happy or upset with you.

6. Cleanliness, beautiful rural scenery, tall skyscrapers, traditional values, high-tech machines, everything coexists there.

7. Most Japanese do not follow any religion. They believe that their work is their identity and their nationalism is their faith. However, Christmas is celebrated all over Japan just for fun and enjoyment. I feel this fascinated me the most as they practice the best form of secularism by putting their nation first.

It will definitely surprise an Indian who has the perception of western developed countries of how one can advance globally while keeping their local identity and values ​​intact.

When I first decided to opt for Japan, the mystical land of the rising sun, for my high school trip, I had only limited knowledge of the country's culture, customs, and etiquette. In fact, we often have friends and families who travel to Europe, the US, Singapore and other parts of the world, but it is rare to find Indians who travel to Japan. This was further confirmed during the visit to Japan, as I only met a handful of Indians there. The reasons soon became apparent to me as I scoured the surroundings.

The first thing you will notice on your trip is the high language barrier that exists. F

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When I first decided to opt for Japan, the mystical land of the rising sun, for my high school trip, I had only limited knowledge of the country's culture, customs, and etiquette. In fact, we often have friends and families who travel to Europe, the US, Singapore and other parts of the world, but it is rare to find Indians who travel to Japan. This was further confirmed during the visit to Japan, as I only met a handful of Indians there. The reasons soon became apparent to me as I scoured the surroundings.

The first thing you will notice on your trip is the high language barrier that exists. Finding a person who can speak / interpret English is like finding Wally in puzzle books. Even in written communication, most things are written only in Japanese, making your life difficult. However, things are slowly changing, as evidenced by the fact that more and more restaurants are also offering menu in English, which brings me to my second topic: food.

Personally, I loved Japanese food and made it a point not to visit any McDonald's or Indian restaurants during my stay in Japan. I liked the dinner we had at Umenohana in Shinjuku and I loved the authentic 11-course Japanese dinner we had at a ryokan in Osaka. There was a lot of variety available in the food (Did you know that there are about 42 different types of Ramen?). But here comes the hard part. If you are a vegetarian, or even if you can only eat egg and chicken with meat, you have very few options left. There is pork, beef or some type of seafood in almost every dish they prepare. Even some places like McDonald's sometimes make beef or pork oil fries. I know of friends who had to rely on ready-to-eat food from India or survive on bread and other items. Now,

However, all this adversity is overshadowed by the best of Japan: the people. The Japanese are full of humility, hard work, and consideration for others. Although they did not understand the language, they did their best to help me whenever I asked for help. There were times when I asked for directions to a place and the person, unable to explain the directions, walked with me to the place. Whenever they couldn't understand something, they would bow down and apologize profusely for not being able to help. The Japanese hospitality was simply the best. It is not surprising, then, that there is one word 'Omotenashi' that sums up the whole essence of this hospitality.

Another thing I noticed was the deep sense of discipline and precision ingrained within Japanese society. There is no chaos and people queue for everything, so much so that even to take the photo in front of the famous Hogwarts building at Universal Studios, there was a line. Punctuality is of the utmost importance and all buses, trains, ferry trips and meetings start at the exact time. Even though I tried my best to beat the clock, the Indian in me caused me to miss my bus from Tokyo to Kawaguchiko (crazy that I was even hoping to find my bus from 6:20 PM to 6:25 PM). One of my Japanese friends also told me how students are trained in the event of an earthquake. They don't panic, they don't run,

Overall, I had an amazing time in Japan, I was lucky enough to meet some of the most amazing people, and I took home some important life lessons that I learned during my time there.

I lived in Japan as a child.

My father held an official position in Japan for about 4 years, and I did 3 years of my education from there. I worked in Osaka and we used to live in a nearby town called Kobe.

It was one of the most incredible 3.5 years of my life (Dad stayed 6 more months). I had to join an international school (St. Michael's in Kobe) because studying in a Japanese school would have been very difficult for me since the classes, most of the books are in Japanese, at St. Michael's most of our teachers were from USA, UK, Australia, Philippines etc: I would like to share

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I lived in Japan as a child.

My father held an official position in Japan for about 4 years, and I did 3 years of my education from there. I worked in Osaka and we used to live in a nearby town called Kobe.

It was one of the most incredible 3.5 years of my life (Dad stayed 6 more months). I had to join an international school (St. Michael's in Kobe) because studying in a Japanese school would have been very difficult for me since the classes, most of the books are in Japanese, at St. Michael's most of our teachers were From USA, UK, Australia, Philippines etc - I'd like to share some of my experiences there as a child:

  1. The people of Japan know very little English, so it was an obligation for us to learn Japanese and it is a wonderful language. There are several Japanese learning centers in Japan that teach Japanese for free to foreigners and I joined one of them.
  2. At the age of 10 he used to travel alone almost 8 kilometers first by bike and then training to learn Japanese (imagine sending your 10 year old son alone to India), it is an extremely safe country.
  3. I was around 12 years old and had joined the YMCA for swimming lessons. Once on the road, I was lost, this old man walked with me for 10 minutes just to show me the way. People are extremely helpful, they will go out of their way to help someone in need.
  4. Even after being one of the most developed and industrialized nations in the world, Japan is very green, there is huge forest cover even around metropolitan cities like Tokyo, Osaka, Kyoto.
  5. One of the cleanest places ever! I've been to the US, UK, France, Italy but they are not as clean as a city in Japan, I guess Switzerland and Austria are the closest to it.
  6. Japanese are usually a bit different from foreigners, but once they get comfortable, they are a very happy bunch to be around.
  7. The best subway connectivity in the world. We literally traveled to other cities using the local subways. How? Well, where one city's subway ends, another begins. :P
  8. The weather is amazing! Winters are only harsh in the northern region of Hokkaido, and summer temperatures never exceed 35 degrees Celsius (95F).
  9. Fortunately we are non-vegetarian, because it is extremely difficult to find vegetarian food in Japan (they consider that fish is vegetarian: P)
  10. It is expensive! A small chocolate bar would cost about 200 yen (1.5 dollars or 130 rupees).
  11. Very few fat people, don't think you see a lot of sumo wrestlers there;)

If you go to Japan you might find it a bit difficult to adjust there initially, however after a while, there is nowhere like it.

Japan has wonderfully shaped Westernization and its ancient culture, they are people with a high sense of pride, honesty and honor. The Japanese believe in working hard to offer the best of everything to their people and everyone else.

I can try to answer this question since I have spent three months moving to Japan from India.

My flight was from Mumbai to Delhi (3 hour layover and transfer to connecting flight) and finally from Delhi to Tokyo, Narita airport. I got here in the morning around 8:30 am and it was too hot in here. After that, I got my green card at the airport (this is important for people in WP in Japan). From the airport departure I bought bus tickets from Tokyo to Utsunomiya, Tochigi (duration 2.5 hrs).

I came to Japan on WP, so I don't need to find a job, but a place to live. I also needed to register my address to get an RC card in two weeks

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I can try to answer this question since I have spent three months moving to Japan from India.

My flight was from Mumbai to Delhi (3 hour layover and transfer to connecting flight) and finally from Delhi to Tokyo, Narita airport. I got here in the morning around 8:30 am and it was too hot in here. After that, I got my green card at the airport (this is important for people in WP in Japan). From the airport departure I bought bus tickets from Tokyo to Utsunomiya, Tochigi (duration 2.5 hrs).

I came to Japan on WP, so I don't need to find a job, but a place to live. I also needed to register my address to get an RC card within two weeks of landing and also a Japanese bank account. My situation was like the following panda: P

The first week was restless, hectic for me as I was going through jet lag and I am a pure vegetarian so I always had cravings for vegetarian and spicy food and somewhere I had in mind that living here would be difficult for me. I lived in a hotel near the station and after 3 weeks I got a 2LDK (LDK means a living room with a dining-kitchen area plus 2 bedrooms) on the 4th floor with the scenic beauty of the mountains and the lights of the town. I got a perfect rented apartment near the station (I'll explain later why I chose near the station) living alone in this huge apartment gives me the feeling of being the queen of somewhere. Here's a glimpse of my living room. I live in Utsunomiya, Tochigi prefecture.

Now, getting back to my weekday routine, I get up at 6am in the morning (since the mornings are early here, around 4am everything is visible outside my balcony) and do some exercise (I turned a room for yoga and exercise, the other is the bedroom) or go for a jog nearby if it's not raining. After that I prepare my breakfast, lunch and I get ready and leave at 7:45 to take the train at 08/03 (that's why an apartment near the station). Get to the office at 9 and leave the office at 6:15, get home at 7:30 pm. I cook a light dinner and watch something on my laptop. Finally, go to sleep at 11pm following this routine 5 days a week.

Coming on the weekends, oh! I love weekends in Japan. Throughout the day of the week I prepare my list of where to go on the weekends for sightseeing. On my first weekend, I went to the Sensō-ji shrine and the Tokyo Sky tree in Tokyo. The view was incredible from 450 feet up and since everything was clear and sunny I was able to see Mount Fuji as well. These are a few clicks.

# Sensō-ji temple

#Zoo, Utsunomiya

#Nikko

Every day is different here not only because of the weather. I have a lot of Japanese friends here and all day they want to learn and hear about India and they always try to eat my lunch at work. Some like Indian tea and come to my house just for that reason;). I have heard that the Japanese don't like Indians, but they have never faced this situation until now.

There are many Indian restaurants near the station, mostly run by Nepalese people with the Indian flag, when I feel like eating Indian food, I go there. I also tried delicious Japanese meatballs and ramen.

Vegan ramen

Within three months, it experienced a few earthquakes and recently, it was marked safe from Typhoon Hagibis. ;)

Japan is so clean and beautiful, everyone follows the rules and I like their tradition of greeting each other. I love the weekends here. I hope that during my stay in Japan I can travel to all the favorite places that I dreamed of. Also, I am looking forward to Halloween, New Years in Japan, fireworks, a photo in kimono.

I have 3 personal cases for you. Me, my father and my father's friend.

I am of South Indian descent, but I am an American. So it might be a different experience for you if you are from India.

I have no dietary restrictions, my first language is English, I was 20/21 years old when I was in Japan and I had a low-intermediate level of Japanese.

For me, being in Japan was incredible. The best time of my life.

No one was visibly racist with me for being Indian

They also considered me more attractive than when I was in America.

Many people did not know what my race or ethnicity was. They knew I was an American, but the

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I have 3 personal cases for you. Me, my father and my father's friend.

I am of South Indian descent, but I am an American. So it might be a different experience for you if you are from India.

I have no dietary restrictions, my first language is English, I was 20/21 years old when I was in Japan and I had a low-intermediate level of Japanese.

For me, being in Japan was incredible. The best time of my life.

No one was visibly racist with me for being Indian

They also considered me more attractive than when I was in America.

Many people did not know what my race or ethnicity was. They knew I was an American, but the fact that I wasn't black or white sparked some curiosity about what I was.

So when it comes to being Indian in Japan, there aren't many problems. But again, I am an American.

My father, however, is culturally Indian. He seems more Indian than me. He has been to Japan a few times before me.

His experience was the same (I'm not sure if he was popular with women or not, I'd rather not know), but he had no complaints, no racism directed at him, nothing.

It has dietary restrictions (not beef), but it is not completely vegetarian. Food was not a big deal for him.

My father's friend grew up in India and now lives in Japan. He has been living in Japan for 8 years now, and will be raising his family there. He loves food (there are no dietary restrictions other than beef), he loves the people, the culture, the environment, etc. There are no complaints about racism.

If there was racism, it is well hidden. The Japanese tend not to talk about negative things with people they don't know well.

In general, there is nothing special or too bad about being an Indian in Japan. Unless you have strict dietary restrictions, you should be fine.

If you are more culturally Indian, you will find many of the same cultural tropes that you know: not wearing shoes indoors, respect for the elderly, etc.

If you're worried about people treating you differently, my advice is don't be uncomfortable and learn the basics: good body language, smiling, smelling good (if you eat a lot of spicy food, it can produce some body odor, and Japanese they are not used to strong body odors) and, if you can, learn Japanese.

Learning Japanese should be easy if you speak a South Indian language, as the basic grammatical structure is very similar.

I was in Japan for my research internship. To be precise, I was in Tokyo. Following things to consider:

Busy city: Tokyo is the busiest city. You should not think about traveling by train during rush hours (9-10 AM and 5-7 PM). You will see people everywhere, be it on the street, shopping malls, shops, etc.

Suica Card:

This is a convenient and effective card. You can recharge it at any store, train station. The best thing about this card is that it can be used anywhere, from the railway to the bus, from the malls to the shops.

Expensive: Tokyo is expensive, but it is normal for people living in Japan because they have high income. (Even me

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I was in Japan for my research internship. To be precise, I was in Tokyo. Following things to consider:

Busy city: Tokyo is the busiest city. You should not think about traveling by train during rush hours (9-10 AM and 5-7 PM). You will see people everywhere, be it on the street, shopping malls, shops, etc.

Suica Card:

This is a convenient and effective card. You can recharge it at any store, train station. The best thing about this card is that it can be used anywhere, from the railway to the bus, from the malls to the shops.

Expensive: Tokyo is expensive, but it is normal for people living in Japan because they have high income. (I even earned high income during my internship :))). But for Indians who convert everything to rupees, Japan will be more expensive. During my stay, I went to Pizza Hut in Tokyo, so even for a simple pizza it was around 2000 yen. Housing is very expensive. I was living in a hostel with a single room, it cost my host university around 100,000 yen / month.

Helpful People: Japan is known for its technology and also for its welcoming people. People in Japan are very helpful. Even if they don't know English, they will try to help you. I had many incidents where I received help from people.

Food: In Japan, vegetarians will have a lot of problems. First of all, most of the restaurant will not have vegetarian food. Even if they do, it will be just salad. During my stay in Tokyo, I only had French fries and cheese pizza.

Best place to visit: As I was in Tokyo, I can tell you about Tokyo and the best place to see

Harajuku Street: It has several commercial stores. If you like to go shopping, it may be your best place.

Shinjuku: They built this new toho cinema with godzilla on top.

Mount Fujii: the best and most peaceful place to visit. They have Mount Fujii and also an amusement park.

There are many things to see in Japan. I enjoyed my stay and I hope you guys enjoy your stay too.

Of all the countries I have visited, Japan is the one that fascinates me the most.

I was visiting for 2 weeks. During this time, I ran into precisely 2 people who appeared to be from the Indian subcontinent; one of them ran an Indian restaurant.

Although the Indians weren't that common, the Japanese never made me feel a stranger or uncomfortable. I rarely got an occasional second glance, but they never stared at me. Sometimes people would ask me where I was from and how long I was visiting, but everyone was always respectful and polite. As a solo traveler, I never felt vulnerable

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Of all the countries I have visited, Japan is the one that fascinates me the most.

I was visiting for 2 weeks. During this time, I ran into precisely 2 people who appeared to be from the Indian subcontinent; one of them ran an Indian restaurant.

Although the Indians weren't that common, the Japanese never made me feel a stranger or uncomfortable. I rarely got an occasional second glance, but they never stared at me. Sometimes people would ask me where I was from and how long I was visiting, but everyone was always respectful and polite. As a solo traveler, I never felt vulnerable or threatened.

On a Shinkansen trip, I offered a man next to me some Britannia Good Day cookies. I was surprised when he grabbed 3 of them. Then he told me that he had visited Nepal and India and remembered them from his visit. (I later learned from a friend that eating on trains is considered rude in Japan, but no one said anything)

In another case, an older man I spoke to on the train. He also mentioned his travels to India. As an Indian, I felt that the Japanese have great respect for our people.

Being an Indian, I was able to see the stark contrast between the Indian and Japanese cultures. In my humble opinion, both cultures are unique in their own way.

The images below are the ones I captured on my trip.

Culture: As in India, the Japanese seemed to be tied to their culture, but they have assimilated the western into their Japanese culture. This, in my opinion, has given rise to the Japanese way of life, which is unique in the world.

Punctuality: Japan sets a different global standard when it comes to punctuality. Growing up, 'IST (Indian Standard Time)' was a phrase used to justify being late, sometimes for hours. In Japan, a train that departs 300 miles away arrives at its destination precisely at the minute it is scheduled. Being even 1 minute late is unacceptable and the train operator apologizes to the passengers. As an Indian, this level of punctuality was unimaginable.

Littering in public: Growing up in Mumbai, if I had a magic wand, the only thing I would change if I could, was people's perception of littering. Where people casually dump trash off trains and on roads in India, in Japan, you will never find a single piece of trash on the road. Despite the fact that there are no public garbage cans. The roads seem freshly washed. The Japanese are expected to keep their garbage and take it home.

Surprise Origami: I got Origami with random things that I bought. Totally unexpected
The one in the picture below, I got it when I changed currency at the bank. In another case, I got an Origami Swan from a vendor I bought Sushi from.

Food: Like the Indians, the Japanese take pride in their food. The food is very decorative, colorful and well presented. Fish and seafood are fresh to a different level. Having grown up eating fish, the fishy stench that we experience in Indian fish markets does not exist in Japanese markets. I was hugely surprised to find that the largest seafood market in Japan had no fishy smell. For the Indian palate that expects multiple flavors and spices, Japanese food can taste bland. However, it has its own unique flavor. Spicy food is available, but it is not as spicy as Indian food.

Types of Food: When it comes to meat and seafood options, the Japanese eat mostly fish followed by pork. Beef and chicken are available but expensive. Their desserts consist of a variety of beans. Milk-based desserts weren't very common

Onsen / Sento (Japanese hot springs or public baths) - Public baths are common in Japan and are part of Japanese culture. And yes, you are expected to be completely naked. Despite all this nudity, there was never an awkward moment. Japanese baths have strict rules of etiquette and hygiene. The Japanese take them very seriously.

Being an Indian, this was a difficult endeavor, but I mustered the courage and convinced myself to give it a try.

PS: if you have a tattoo, you may be denied entry to an Onsen / Sento

Etiquette: Manners mean a lot in Japan, and the Japanese take their application very seriously.

When visiting someone, they are expected to remove their shoes outside the house. You are provided with slippers (flip flops) that should only be worn indoors.

Out of consideration for other passengers, it is forbidden to speak on the phone on trains. So is eating.

They greet you and you will bow to everyone you meet.

In some restaurants, I had to take my shoes off and put them in a locker before lunch.

As Indians, our culture tends to be less formal and more friendly. Japanese culture, on the other hand, seemed to lean towards the formal. I don't see that one is better than the other, but there is a stark contrast between how the Indians view day-to-day labels and how the Japanese do.

Maps - Maps are ubiquitous. Even in a small town, I was never more than 10-20 minutes from a map.
Growing up in India, I rarely had to read a map to get around. Traveling around Japan, I had to train myself to read them because I didn't have a GPS at my disposal.

Once, when I was lost, I went into a dry cleaner to ask for directions. The lady did not speak English, but she gave me a map.
Below is a street map in a small Japanese town, very unexpected in an Indian town or village.

Organized and perfect:

The Japanese are obsessed with perfection. As an Indian, we do not attach importance to minor details, but the Japanese value it immensely.
If you're not careful and forget the little details, someone will / could point it out to you.

Look how well this fruit vendor fixed it. I have seen fruit and vegetable vendors in India do this as well, but the Japanese value of expecting perfection carries over into all aspects of their life.

Shinkansen (bullet train) - it's exciting to be on it. Extremely clean compared to Indian trains.

Bikes:

Japan is designed for bicycles. The roads are nice and it is easy to ride a bike.

Illustrations:

The Japanese make cartoons for all instructions. They are very easy to understand, even if they are in Japanese that you don't understand.

Following the rules:

Japan is extremely organized, disciplined, clean, and structured. There are rules for everything. This is in complete contrast to India. For the Japanese, if there are rules, they must be followed. On the contrary, for us Indians, if there are rules, they should be broken or avoided :)

Being an Indian in Japan can take some getting used to, but when all is said and done, you will gain perspective that might have been lost if you had grown up in India.

  • Living in Japan will be very difficult at first as there will be an initial period where you will have to adjust to the situation, the food, the people, the language and the job. If you are a vegetarian, you will have a hard time as there are not many options for restaurants and even in convenient stores and there are hardly any sandwiches available. Otherwise, food will not be a problem. 5 to 6 months is cold and August is the hottest. Language will be a bigger barrier as they do not understand English or understand it but will not choose to speak. As a tourist you can still drive in the tourist area otherwise it is a great pr
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  • Living in Japan will be very difficulty intially, as in there will be teething period where you need to adjust with wether,food,people, language and work. If you are vegetarian you will have tough time as there are not much option of resturants and even in cconviniance stores as well hardly any snacks available. Otherwise food won't be a problem. 5 to 6 months its cold and August is the hottest. Language will be a biggest barrier as they do not understand english or they understand but they will not opt to talk. As a tourist you will still can manage in the tourist area other wise its a big problem. Its advisable if you learn basic language from here and go there, however you will surely forget there the moment you reach there..lolz. Thanks to smart phones, they will help you though. In first 3 months you will be fedup and would want to leave the country ASAP, considering you are Indian and loves your friends and family and would want to be them all the time. If you are with family then also life will not be easy. But but but .. after 3 months you all will be adjusted and if you can pick the language then you will be at ease. The best you get there is personel space, easy life style as in everything is so convinient there, transoportation, work style ,banking, etc etc but vegetarian people need to cook at their home all the time. I am writing more negative as you will experince everything but still after all you will definately like Japan and you would never want to be back. But to experince that you must live for 3 months atleast.
  • Japan and Japanese are different from the world, so you will learn many things and be surprised with so many things. It is definitely a great place to live

I am a South Indian living in Yokohama, Japan for 4 months. I feel very lucky to live in Japan.

The Japanese culture is not very comfortable for the Chinese compared to other Asians, the Chinese have two advantages. The first is the Chinese characters used in the Japanese language, which is called kaanji. The second is appearance, it is difficult to tell the difference between Chinese and Japanese unless they speak.

As an Indian, I feel like it takes time to adapt Japanese culture.

Language: During the first weeks I used hand signals to communicate with people in restaurants, supermarkets, etc. In the worst c

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I am a South Indian living in Yokohama, Japan for 4 months. I feel very lucky to live in Japan.

The Japanese culture is not very comfortable for the Chinese compared to other Asians, the Chinese have two advantages. The first is the Chinese characters used in the Japanese language, which is called kaanji. The second is appearance, it is difficult to tell the difference between Chinese and Japanese unless they speak.

As an Indian, I feel like it takes time to adapt Japanese culture.

Language : For first few weeks I was using hand signals to communicate with people in restaurants, supermarket, etc,. At the worst case I use Google translate in my mobile.

Food: It's easy to find Indian restaurant in Japan, Japanese people love Naan and curry (only North indian food ).But It's difficult to find spicy food. Food is not a big problem if you are non-vegetarian. Beef and pork used more than chicken.

People : Japanese people are kind, punctual, hardworking, shy, intelligent, polite. People never get angry. No thefts, No crimes, No Racism.

It takes few months to get adapted with Japanese culture. If you understand and accept the culture, you will have a good time even if you live for a long time.

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