How difficult is it for a foreigner to get a job in England?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Tilly Lane



How difficult is it for a foreigner to get a job in England?

For an EU citizen, it is not very difficult, although you may not get the kind of job that you could have gotten in your home country, if your English is not very good.

For anyone from outside the EU, a lot depends on what you say on your visa. If your visa says that you are not allowed to work, or not for more than a certain number of hours per week, then you mean it; If you do not comply with the terms of your visa and are caught, you and your employer will be in serious trouble. And, as I said before, if your English is not good (although I notice that the English in your question has now been fixed a bit),

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For an EU citizen, it is not very difficult, although you may not get the kind of job that you could have gotten in your home country, if your English is not very good.

For anyone from outside the EU, a lot depends on what you say on your visa. If your visa says that you are not allowed to work, or not for more than a certain number of hours per week, then you mean it; If you do not comply with the terms of your visa and are caught, you and your employer will be in serious trouble. And, as I said before, if your English is not good (although I notice that the English in your question has now been fixed a bit), you will probably find that you cannot easily get the kind of job that you could have gotten. at home.

If you are an EU citizen, it is not difficult at all.

If you are not an EU citizen, you must have formal education and work experience in one of the shortage occupations.

When applying for a job in the UK, always check the job posting for the correct way to apply. The usual two ways are with a completed application form (which you will need to request from the company) or with a CV, and applications are often posted, not emailed.

It is not common to send copies of your qualifications, letters of reference, or a photo with the initial application, but do review the job posting carefully.

These documents will be necessary if you get an interview, so keep them in a folder ready to present.

As always, make sure you meet the application deadline and check that you meet all the criteria.

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When applying for a job in the UK, always check the job posting for the correct way to apply. The usual two ways are with a completed application form (which you will need to request from the company) or with a CV, and applications are often posted, not emailed.

It is not common to send copies of your qualifications, letters of reference, or a photo with the initial application, but do review the job posting carefully.

These documents will be necessary if you get an interview, so keep them in a folder ready to present.

As always, make sure you meet the application deadline and verify that you meet all of the job criteria. Tailor your CV and cover letter to show how you check all the boxes and therefore are the best person for the job.

What is a CV?

CV is short for Curriculum Vitae and it is not completely different from a resume in that it is a summary about you. Try to keep it to 1 page or 2 pages maximum. Keep it short and well organized to help the HR team verify your criteria. White space is good on the page, so don't write too much.

If possible, you should tailor your CV for each job application and the best place to do this is in the 'Personal Profile' at the top.

These are the points to include in a standard CV:

  • Name - Font larger than the rest of the text, usually centered at the top.
  • Contact information: address, phone, email, usually centered under your name.
  • Personal profile: short paragraph about you. Write in the first person (I am ...) and use appropriate adjectives (I am a worker, etc.). Don't be silly as no one will read it and then they might miss out on the good in you.
  • Employment History - Most recent at the top. Include company name, title, brief job description, and dates. Consider whether you only need to list the years of your jobs or the months and years. Of course, if there is a gap, you will be asked about this in the interview, so be prepared.
  • Education and Grades - List most recent studies first and include high school grades.
  • Training / Courses - List the appropriate additional training you have taken that did not mean a qualification, a 1-day customer service course.
  • Skills - Optional section, but can include bulleted list of skills such as languages, IT knowledge, driver's license, etc.
  • References - Optional section, but if you have space include the name and contact information of two people willing to give you a reference. References are usually needed for job applications, but adding the details to your CV is not crucial.

You may note that it is not necessary to include your date of birth, citizenship, marital status, but you can include them if you wish.

UK paper size

Please note that standard letter paper in the UK is A4, so print your cover letter and CV on this size of paper.

Presentation letter

Always include a typed cover letter with your application and keep it short and simple. You need three main paragraphs:

  • One reason to write: "I would like to apply for the position of ..."
  • A short paragraph about you. Tell them why you are the best person for the job.
  • Your hopes for the future.

End with a short and courteous conclusion. "Hope to hear from you" may be enough.

How to apply

It can be tempting to send your application in a large plastic folder, thinking that this will mean that it will turn heads. This is probably not the case as your app is likely to separate from the rest of the stack and not come back. If you want to use a wallet, choose an A4-size plastic presentation wallet with a clear front cover. This way, your HR team won't be bothered to open a fancy folder or remove papers from a zip-top bag. When I was working in an office, the first thing I did with applications and shipments was remove all the fancy 'extras' and staple the papers.

Follow-up / Responses

Don't be put off to learn that you are unlikely to receive a response to all of your job applications. In reality, you are unlikely to receive an answer unless you are wanted for an interview. This is simply due to the large number of applications and the additional work and expense that this would incur. I have known larger companies that use a standard postal receipt to let you know that your application has been received and to let you know if you don't hear from them in the next 3 weeks then it has not been successful.

HR departments don't want a follow-up call from every applicant for every vacancy or they would never hang up the phone. Really, don't call them after a week to ask if your letter got there. Make sure it arrives yourself by personally delivering the application or submitting it via Recorded Delivery (must be signed). But with that said, if you're sure you're the right person for the job and it's been a month since the closing date (which you obviously knew about), give them a call. Be clear, polite and don't waste time.

conclusion

It takes time to get through the selection process and get the job started, even if you are selected, so always plan ahead. Employers expect candidates to have to give notice before leaving their current job, so it can take months from when you first saw the ad to the first day at your new job. Remember, it's easier to look for a new job while you're already working, so don't rush into these things. Find the right job for you.

It clearly depends on the nature of the job and the industry sector, but I have found that in the UK it is not too difficult to get a job in my own experience of growing up and working in 13 different countries around the world.

In fact, I've found that the UK is generally easier to get a job than Hong Kong, Japan, Singapore, and the US, and somewhat easier than the rest of Europe.

Not only that, but the general UK work environment tends to be more pleasant than elsewhere.

When I say "environment", a big part is working with other people; All in all, it's nice to work with the British.

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It clearly depends on the nature of the job and the industry sector, but I have found that in the UK it is not too difficult to get a job in my own experience of growing up and working in 13 different countries around the world.

In fact, I've found that the UK is generally easier to get a job than Hong Kong, Japan, Singapore, and the US, and somewhat easier than the rest of Europe.

Not only that, but the general UK work environment tends to be more pleasant than elsewhere.

When I say "environment", a big part is working with other people; All in all, it's nice to work with the British. This is despite many Brits saying otherwise.

There is less sexism and other types of discrimination in the UK than in many countries where I have worked. Despite the often quoted about social class stratification in British society, I have found the UK to be much less hierarchical than most other places.

In terms of labor law, the UK has a comparatively clearer framework, less ambiguous and less open to questions of "interpretation" than in many other countries. The next place that has an equally straightforward framework is Hong Kong, which is the most doctrinally common law jurisdiction in the world next to the UK.

I've been asked to answer this, otherwise I probably wouldn't. OP claims he is a 30 year old British citizen with no prior work experience and has never lived in the UK. I can't really answer about how easy it would be to find a job without asking a few questions.

  1. Language skills? Do you speak English at a reasonable level?
  2. Education? You have reached 30 without work experience. Is it because you have been in advanced higher education or have you been financially inactive?
  3. Other circumstances and experience. It may or may not make a difference.

If they had asked me this

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I've been asked to answer this, otherwise I probably wouldn't. OP claims he is a 30 year old British citizen with no prior work experience and has never lived in the UK. I can't really answer about how easy it would be to find a job without asking a few questions.

  1. Language skills? Do you speak English at a reasonable level?
  2. Education? You have reached 30 without work experience. Is it because you have been in advanced higher education or have you been financially inactive?
  3. Other circumstances and experience. It may or may not make a difference.

If I had been asked this question six months ago, I would have said that anyone who really wants to work will find a job, it may not be the perfect job, honestly, it can even be a horrible job, but you would probably find something. But as current events unfold, as they keep saying, it is unprecedented. If the OP is willing to pick fruit, that would provide them with immediate employment and some experience as well.

If this is your first time visiting the UK, please go online and make sure your tax situation is correct.

Although the myth has spread among non-natives, while living in England you will find a surprising number of English speaking broken English and grammatically incorrect. Therefore, this is not necessarily a reason to be rejected.

However, putting this aside, in terms of your question, I'd say it depends on three things: what skills you have, what type and size of company you choose to work for, and how much money you expect in return.

  1. The reason I chose skills as the first item is that it all comes down to your application (CV, cover letter, and interview). The Internet is full of work sites that wi
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Although the myth has spread among non-natives, while living in England you will find a surprising number of English speaking broken English and grammatically incorrect. Therefore, this is not necessarily a reason to be rejected.

However, putting this aside, in terms of your question, I'd say it depends on three things: what skills you have, what type and size of company you choose to work for, and how much money you expect in return.

  1. The reason I chose skills as the first item is that it all comes down to your application (CV, cover letter, and interview). The internet is full of job sites that will list the skills required for a position (as an office assistant). A good one with many articles is Monster Jobs. Pick a job for Office Assistant and take a look at the required skills: being a quick learner, Microsoft Office knowledge, etc. Check how your skills and those written on your CV match those that the company needs. This can help you a lot in both the initial application and the interview.
  2. The size of the company (be it a corporate technology company or a family company) is very important both in terms of application and its daily function, that is, what you learn, how difficult it is to get the job, what you do each day, how you can progress to earn more money.
  3. London is a large and highly competitive city. Luck and salary expectation can play an important role when applying for a job. Always check the websites that show roughly how much the rank is for that position, so you don't get sabotaged once you get to the interview.

To conclude, you can get a job as an office assistant in London if you are a foreigner. The likelihood of this happening depends on luck, skills, and expectations. I wish you the best of luck.

Ana, thank you for the A2A

The answer will greatly depend on what type of job, your experience and where you want to live and for how long.

If you are outside of New Zealand, it will be extremely difficult to obtain a uniform interview using normal New Zealand job boards such as Trademe or Seek; people want to meet face-to-face in most cases so you will need to be in New Zealand and generally authorized. to work in the field.

Some employers sponsor workers abroad; there are few websites that can help. You must have qualifications, skills and experience that are demanded in New Zealand; unskilled workers do not

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Ana, thank you for the A2A

The answer will greatly depend on what type of job, your experience and where you want to live and for how long.

If you are outside of New Zealand, it will be extremely difficult to obtain a uniform interview using normal New Zealand job boards such as Trademe or Seek; people want to meet face-to-face in most cases so you will need to be in New Zealand and generally authorized. to work in the field.

Some employers sponsor workers abroad; there are few websites that can help. You must have qualifications, skills and experience that are demanded in New Zealand; unskilled workers won't get very far. Links here

Jobs in New Zealand | Immigration to New Zealand

https://www.workhere.co.nz/

If you are on vacation with work, informal work is usually quite easy to come by, but you should make sure you have a vacation visa with work. This generally includes fruit picking or hospitality work, although some people have picked up shop and office work. You probably shouldn't expect to earn much more than minimum wage in most of these jobs which are realistically a way to expand your travel budget.

There are many jobs for labor, carpentry, bricklayers, plumbers, carpenters, etc. The problem is not necessarily the jobs, but the willingness of employers to hire you. I applied for over 200 jobs in just under 2 months. I'm from the US here almost 6 years. I haven't had interviews with tons of standard rejection email responses. I am a university student and I am also occupationally qualified in the vacant positions that are advertised. I now remove the location / cities from my CV from places outside the UK where I have worked to try and remove any additional bias from a recruitment agent or company. I have a UK phone number and email address

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There are many jobs for labor, carpentry, bricklayers, plumbers, carpenters, etc. The problem is not necessarily the jobs, but the willingness of employers to hire you. I applied for over 200 jobs in just under 2 months. I'm from the US here almost 6 years. I haven't had interviews with tons of standard rejection email responses. I am a university student and I am also occupationally qualified in the vacant positions that are advertised. I now remove the location / cities from my CV from places outside the UK where I have worked to try and remove any additional bias from a recruitment agent or company. I have a UK phone number and email address so I can only suggest you keep trying.

You have not indicated which area of ​​psychology you wish to pursue. Do you want to be a professor of psychology who teaches and researches at a university? The number of universities with open teaching positions may be limited based on developmental psychology, cognitive psychology, neuroscience, learning, developmental or social psychology. Or you might be interested in the intersection of law and psychology for a career in forensic psychology. There are not as many graduate programs or jobs in this profession as you might think of television shows. You may be considering the field of counseling

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You have not indicated which area of ​​psychology you wish to pursue. Do you want to be a professor of psychology who teaches and researches at a university? The number of universities with open teaching positions may be limited based on developmental psychology, cognitive psychology, neuroscience, learning, developmental or social psychology. Or you might be interested in the intersection of law and psychology for a career in forensic psychology. There are not as many graduate programs or jobs in this profession as you might think of television shows. You may be considering the field of counseling, which has a growing need in all age groups. Requires at least a master's degree in psychology (or EDUC or SOCW). Most public schools hire at least one EDUC PSYC professional, so there are careers in this field. A clinical degree is more difficult to obtain; But they have jobs that are often associated with larger clinics, hospitals, and medical professionals, as well as positions in private practice. Health psychology is a growing field; therefore, you may find a new way to travel.

Too many variables to directly answer your needs. I travel a lot and have been in and out of studies full time for 7 years. Between travel and studies, I have had no trouble finding short-term jobs in fields like warehouse work, bar work, or labor. Most of these jobs are zero hour contracts and do not provide good job security, but for some people like me it has been appropriate. My mother, after losing her last job, quickly found work as a caregiver for the elderly and disabled. If this type of work is adequate, then you will have little trouble.

However, if you are looking for som

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Too many variables to directly answer your needs. I travel a lot and have been in and out of studies full time for 7 years. Between travel and studies, I have had no trouble finding short-term jobs in fields like warehouse work, bar work, or labor. Most of these jobs are zero hour contracts and do not provide good job security, but for some people like me it has been appropriate. My mother, after losing her last job, quickly found work as a caregiver for the elderly and disabled. If this type of work is adequate, then you will have little trouble.

However, whether you are looking for something higher paying, professional or in a specific field, of course depends on your experience, education, location, suitability, and commitment. If it is from abroad, this is even more complicated; You may need your visa to be sponsored by a job that has already been assigned to you while you were in your home country.

Generally yes.

Although it will depend on your sector / industry, skills and nationality. If you have an education in the United States with a bachelor's degree, that puts you in the lowest category of having favorable employability among foreigners; If you are educated in the United States with an advanced degree, you will have better opportunities and options; If you have an education in the US with a degree in computer science, biotechnology, engineering, or STEM in general, you will be the most employable among foreign nationals, and in some cases more so than US natives.

That being said, if you can't get H1-B from a company, it will depend on your luck, a

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Generally yes.

Although it will depend on your sector / industry, skills and nationality. If you have an education in the United States with a bachelor's degree, that puts you in the lowest category of having favorable employability among foreigners; If you are educated in the United States with an advanced degree, you will have better opportunities and options; If you have an education in the US with a degree in computer science, biotechnology, engineering, or STEM in general, you will be the most employable among foreign nationals, and in some cases more so than US natives.

That being said, if you can't get H1-B from a company, then it will depend on your luck, and in the lottery you will compete against people as competent AND not close at all as you in terms of skills and education. I personally know a prospective investment banker who has to compete with a high school library staff (they entered the lottery the same year) and was unsuccessful so he had to be expatriated to an overseas office.

Have you attended 2 interviews and failed to get a job and consider it a failure?

The last time I changed jobs I applied for about 30 positions and attended 6 interviews before I was successful. I think this is quite normal.

Also, in my industry (theater / live music / events) the last 2 times I changed jobs I had to accept a pay cut every time because every time there is a job available the company takes the opportunity to cut pay to save money. . If they did not, they could not be sure of continuing the business, because profits are very tight in this sector. In the present

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Have you attended 2 interviews and failed to get a job and consider it a failure?

The last time I changed jobs I applied for about 30 positions and attended 6 interviews before I was successful. I think this is quite normal.

Also, in my industry (theater / live music / events) the last 2 times I changed jobs I had to accept a pay cut every time because every time there is a job available the company takes the opportunity to cut pay to save money. . If they did not, they could not be sure of continuing the business, because profits are very tight in this sector. In today's economic climate, I imagine we are not the only ones suffering from fewer jobs being advertised or less paying.

While it is true that your use of English is not 100%, I am not sure it is a problem as others have suggested as:

1) You have made yourself understood perfectly well.

2) Most job descriptions / announcements / supporting information are plagued with poor use of English today (for example, something like 'Candidates shouldn't stay at desks too long, but they have the motto' I'm healthier on the go '”). .

Keep applying and you will end up with a job. You may need to start with less work than you want, but you can always move up the ladder once you are on the first rung.

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