How did UPSC manage your readiness with a full-time job? What was your preparation strategy?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Alex Burns



How did UPSC manage your readiness with a full-time job? What was your preparation strategy?

Thanks for A2A.

I think I am eligible to answer this as I was in a full time job during my preparation. Furthermore, given the nature of my duty, I also couldn't afford long work permits.

First things first, I am not alone and today there are numerous candidates competing successfully at CSE while holding a full time job. I think a big reason for the same is the fact that presentation, examination awareness, and systematic preparation matter just as much, if not more, than knowledge.

My strategy:

  1. Use your time correctly: although it is a cliche, it is extremely imp
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Thanks for A2A.

I think I am eligible to answer this as I was in a full time job during my preparation. Furthermore, given the nature of my duty, I also couldn't afford long work permits.

First things first, I am not alone and today there are numerous candidates competing successfully at CSE while holding a full time job. I think a big reason for the same is the fact that presentation, examination awareness, and systematic preparation matter just as much, if not more, than knowledge.

My strategy:

  1. Use Your Time Right: Although it is a cliche, it is extremely important. Stay equipped and ready to take advantage of the time you have with you. A small example is taking a snapshot of the important pages of the Laxmikanth book. Such snapshots can be referenced even in a meeting or in an elevator.
  2. Plan Your Week Ahead - Key to sticking with your prep schedule. Otherwise, it is always very easy for a working candidate to procrastinate and lose track of their preparation.
  3. Current affairs: In my last two years of preparation, I have covered only Vision and Insights Secure current affairs. I did this because I found that newspapers took a little longer than I could afford. But I did this only after being sure I can cover it without going through the newspapers.
  4. Be consistent - the most important part of my strategy. Even if you don't feel like studying, it is important that you choose something that will keep you interested. Example: You can watch Rajya Sabha videos.
  5. Note taking: it has multiple advantages such as:
    1. Keep your sources limited.
    2. Help in review.
  6. Build Exam Awareness - Feel free to take time to talk to your friends who are preparing so that you are aware of what is actually required. I was particularly bad at this and therefore made certain mistakes that cost me a few tries.

Best wishes !!

नमस्ते ||

You have to divide your day into slots

Morning slot from 4.30 to 6.30 a time slot

Late if you have time 8.30 to 10.30 a turn

If you had a night shift you have to exchange your slots

On vacation you have to spend all your time preparing.

During work hours, if you had a 5 or 10 minute free time, listen to songs or review some current affairs.

Below is an article by one of our students at the IAS Officer Academy - Dr. Mittali Sethi, who earned All India rank 56 in the Civil Services Exam and belongs to the IAS of the 2017 Batch.

“I work from 9 to 5 in my office. I have to work to be financially independent. I have to work to support my family. Anyway, I am too old to study. There are so many people sitting at home and studying that I can't even do this. "

“I work from 9 to 5 in my office. In fact, I value my time much more. I should have less anxiety, less insecurity since I am financially independent. I have people around who

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Below is an article by one of our students at the IAS Officer Academy - Dr. Mittali Sethi, who earned All India rank 56 in the Civil Services Exam and belongs to the IAS of the 2017 Batch.

“I work from 9 to 5 in my office. I have to work to be financially independent. I have to work to support my family. Anyway, I am too old to study. There are so many people sitting at home and studying that I can't even do this. "

“I work from 9 to 5 in my office. In fact, I value my time much more. I should have less anxiety, less insecurity since I am financially independent. I have people around that I can talk to when I need to. I am older and therefore I understand and understand a perspective in a much more mature way. I know there are other people sitting at home, but I have my strengths and I have to focus on them. "

If there was a short version of this article, the difference between the above thought processes is all that one needs to observe, understand and adopt, if one is preparing for the Civil Service Exam (CSE) with a job.

In the last few days, every third inquiry email I read asks me the same question: Can it be done with a job? So I thought this is a very pertinent question, especially since the age limit has now increased and many working professionals want to take the exam. Since I passed the exam while on a job, here are some things I want to pass on:

  1. The first thing I need everyone to understand is that with civil services, everyone's starting point, motivation, and journey is different. Please don't compare yourself to anyone else. You have to stop looking for a "perfect strategy" because there isn't one. Someone could be really bad at Geography, what purpose would you solve if that person follows someone and over-reads Art and Culture? While listening to anyone, including me, never forget the uniqueness of your own journey. And have faith in that uniqueness.
  2. Family management is another very important issue. This is especially true for those who are married, those who live with families or are in a joint family, and those who are a bit on the higher side in terms of age. Many times it is not the immediate family, but the relatives who play with our mentality; please avoid them. You need to keep your own immediate family on the right side of this - if you're a husband or wife, make sure your partner understands your core beliefs and your larger purpose in life. Make sure your parents don't feel left out of your time with them, but instead refuse to attend or participate in useless and pretentious ceremonies. You will have to agree to offend some people on your own principles. I faced a lot of criticism for going out on my own "
  3. A special note for the ladies, here. Being a woman myself, I can understand that women have a unique set of challenges in front of them when they decide to take the exam, and whether you are married or working, it is a double challenge. There is always added pressure to have a child if you don't already have one. Based on the emails I received, there are both ends of the problem. Housewives are equally anxious and unsure about taking the test. If you fall into these categories, don't let anyone around you tell you that you can't do this. You deserve a chance and don't quit without having yours. Read Suruchi's deeply inspiring story in Insights: He passed the 2016 CSE exam with two sons! Nothing else will make you believe that everything is in the mind.
  4. If you are working, you don't have some frills, and you need to take this into account before you start. Close social media, completely if you can. As a psychology student, I can assure you that there are huge subconscious implications of social media. On Facebook and even on WhatsApp groups, you have to witness, by virtue of being part of them, a social life. In general, it is said that if you are fat, do not think that you will not eat a packet of potato chips; instead, don't buy one! It's the same here. If you have to be in these things for your job or for any other practical reason, set strict hours. Use applications that help you turn off the phone for a specified time. And please DO NOT continue to comment unnecessarily in Disqus comments or Forum discussions. You not only waste your own time, but you also make it difficult to find things that are meaningful to others. The bottom line is that if your preparation is compromised because of your job or family, don't introduce one more distraction. Delayed perks, please.
  5. Many people who work, by virtue of their anxiety, always look for some motivation. I used to watch so many TED talks myself and was “inspired”, so to speak. Then one day my husband asked me if I was really working on what I learned from one video before watching the next one. And since I stopped looking at them, I realized the difference. All the lessons are there, you know what you have to do! All you have to do is, as one of my teachers said, shut up and do it. This is something I have said on my blog and I repeat it: have the discipline, the habit will sustain you, motivation alone is useless. Adrenaline is the peak, what you need is a plateau. This is a long way, my dear, build your plateaus.
  6. Know your strengths and I can't stress this enough. Look at yourself objectively without personal attachment. Your age is your strength; if you are older, you have a much more mature perspective than that of a young man. And no matter what anyone else says, that's true if it works for you. You are in a job, it is your strength, you have a backup. Use it to calm your mind. You've taken the step, now don't let the stereotypes about the test hold you back. Understand your strengths. I knew I'm a teacher and if I could break things down for my students, I could extrapolate it to my own studies. I usually write so I didn't practice much before my exams (and this was when everyone around me was saying that writing is very, very important, no matter how much you know). I used that time to read more.
  7. Of course, take shortcuts. I could never get the Hindu grades, my job didn't allow it. And Kumar Ashirwad's article last year was a blessing when he mentioned that newspaper notes are not worth taking. And let me be honest here: there were many times when, due to multiple reasons, I was unable to read the newspaper every day. But there are compilations - Insights creates an amazing collection of hot topics. If you have someone who is curating current affairs for you, why waste your time? I used Vision's PT 365 freely to cover the syllabus. I studied world history in its entirety from training notes; For a single question, you can't afford to read Norman Lowe. Use the resources,
  8. The most important thing is to believe that there is no difference between you and anyone else studying for the exam without work. All you need for the exam is a basic understanding and perspective on the issues around you. Prelims is a factual test, I agree. But above a certain threshold, your brands don't matter, as they aren't counted anyway. For Mains, if you read current affairs every day and think about them, have a personal view of them, that's enough. Main's factual material can be read after the preliminaries. And if you include a simultaneous writing practice, a daily (quality) reading of 5-6 hours is sufficient. Take advantage of the weekends to compensate. Don't let hope be lost and support it with hard and disciplined work.
  9. If you have a few tries with you, don't be complacent, but don't give up either. It may take a while to achieve what you want, but don't beat yourself up. Persist, persist!
  10. This is something I don't really have to say as I'm sure everyone should follow. Take a few sheets before the actual exam. It is important to be with yourself for a while when you go out to test yourself against so many people. I took about two weeks before the preliminaries and a month before the main ones. That was enough.
  11. Using micro opportunities is very important. At no point in my day did I find myself without some kind of learning material. From bath time to sometimes dinner time, I even used 5 minutes to watch or read something. Also, use smart methods - I used to have tools on my laptop to watch videos at twice the speed. (If you need to learn how to do this, please post a comment. We will let you know.)
  12. The compartmentalisation and cross-learning of subjects is once again essential if you are in a job. As an orthodontist, my job and the curriculum had very little in common. But as a doctor, I understood the health sector and reading about politics and economics helped me relate health to them, and vice versa. He could think of transformative healthcare solutions because he now had a 360-degree view. Do you see how working can become your strength in a certain area? Use these strengths; you can actually use them in your exam.

The most important thing, I think, is never to lose your enthusiasm. When I used to think about giving up, I would say to myself, “What would you do after 5 anyway? Eating out, watching TV, being on Facebook. This is better, at least you are learning something! "That helped me to always be excited about this with the lowest expectations. Focus on making the trip better and productive, and accept this from someone who has been through this - the goal will resolve itself. Oh, and by the way , your goal should not be UPSC or IAS. Your goal is to improve a little every day: you are much bigger than UPSC or any other organization / institution. Your purpose is too small if UPSC can defeat you. Don't let that happen! millions of people are counting on you!

How did UPSC manage your readiness with a job?

1. First, you must have a mindset about your current job. It should be treated as a temporary phenomenon in your life. Assume it's just a job, it's not something you want to spend your entire life on. Your passion and burning desire for civil services should be your guiding criteria in your workplace. Therefore, treat your work as it is: it is secondary to your preparation. By this I do not mean that you become too negligent at work. That should not be the case and an aspiring civil servant should never do that. You should ha

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How did UPSC manage your readiness with a job?

1. First, you must have a mindset about your current job. It should be treated as a temporary phenomenon in your life. Assume it's just a job, it's not something you want to spend your entire life on. Your passion and burning desire for civil services should be your guiding criteria in your workplace. Therefore, treat your work as it is: it is secondary to your preparation. By this I do not mean that you become too negligent at work. That should not be the case and an aspiring civil servant should never do that. You need to have that appropriate level of efficiency and professionalism and you need to be able to complete all of your deliverables on time. Don't run after appraisals. Even if you have a bad one, it is not the end of your life. It takes a small sacrifice for a noble cause.

2. I suggest that you keep your UPSC preparation a secret. I understand that this is primarily applicable to the private sector, as in the public sector one might have to file NOC and therefore disclosure.

3. Plan your time in minutes and in some cases even seconds (actually, I calculated how long it takes to take off your lace-up and slip-on shoes once you get back from the office. I know it doesn't make much sense , but those who fight for seconds will go for every possible savings and that's what I did. By switching from lace-up shoes to slip-on shoes, I saved 30-40 seconds)

4. In the early years of preparation, when the focus is on building the foundation, one will have to work harder. I remember waking up at 4 a.m. M. And I read for 2 or 3 hours before I went to the office at 8 a.m. M. Therefore, you must show additional discipline and hard work in the early years.

5. Sometimes it becomes difficult to read at night due to office fatigue and stress. So set a manageable goal for the night, don't be too greedy.

6. Mornings are the best for working professionals, as the chances of being disturbed in the morning are almost nil. So plan your sleep cycle accordingly. It is better to read with a fresh mind in the morning.

7. Don't wait for a printed copy of the newspaper. Start reading pdf copies of the newspaper (The Hindu / India express). These are readily available in various telegram groups.

8. Avoid reading on office computers, avoid discussing UPSC issues with colleagues. Stay committed to your work. However, you can read some news or articles on your mobile, but do so during tea breaks or during lunch hours. I used to skip lunches and I used to read something on that break. You see, you must be hungry to qualify for UPSC: p

9. You have to avoid social gatherings and office parties on purpose. It's just one of the sacrifices you must make for UPSC.

10. Avoid confrontation in the workplace as much as possible. A troubled mind is not good for preparation. You need to be calm as a rock to keep your preparation on track.

11. Be respectful and kind - Everyone you meet is fighting a different battle. Help someone in the workplace if you can. I don't know how it works, but positive energy and blessings find a way to help you.

12. Use telegram widely, as it is faster, saves time and helps in network learning.

13. Use evernote or another online note-making platform to take notes. As a working aspirant, having an accessible platform for taking notes in any situation is crucial. (I have shared my notes at the end of this article, I will give you an idea on how to use evernote).

14. Don't make decisions hastily if you face setbacks at any stage of the exam: pre, general, or interview. Give it a week of time and get ready again.

15. Leaving work is not really a solution. Take it as a challenge and assume that you may have to work in even tougher situations and achieve more difficult goals once you become a civil servant. Such thinking will bring that positive impetus to complete your assignments in your current job. It is important to balance UPSC preparation and your professional responsibility.

General Studies Notes

All the best.

SKR

Bandana Pokhriyal, Rank 83, Approved UPSC Civil Services without leaving work while working as an excise inspector for the past 4.5 years

So here I go. .. this is my story..

I have been working as a central inspector of excise duty for the last four and a half years. And the last two and a half years have been a juggle between work and study. At first things seemed too difficult. I vividly remember that I broke down many times. But once I was able to come up with a plan and schedule on a daily basis, the pace soon developed. I began to prepare a daily schedule and made sure to act in accordance with

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Bandana Pokhriyal, Rank 83, Approved UPSC Civil Services without leaving work while working as an excise inspector for the past 4.5 years

So here I go. .. this is my story..

I have been working as a central inspector of excise duty for the last four and a half years. And the last two and a half years have been a juggle between work and study. At first things seemed too difficult. I vividly remember that I broke down many times. But once I was able to come up with a plan and schedule on a daily basis, the pace soon developed. I began to prepare a daily schedule and made sure to act on it. Since my office hours were almost consuming 8 hours a day, I tried to set practical goals, as setting an impossible goal leads to nothing but frustration in case I can't finish it.

For office goers like me, my advice is to make small flashcards, index cards and keep lots of study material on your phone and between work, when you have even 15 minutes to spare, make the most of it. Also, review and meet your pending goals for the week on your weekend vacation. Saturdays and Sundays should be used to the maximum. Avoid taking unnecessary sheets. I remember going to Delhi to see my family just 4 times in the last 2 years.

Also, don't let a lot of people in your workplace know that you are preparing, as most tend to ask every month "Arey, Kya hua, it turns out to be a gaya" ... this, my friends, is starting to get you the nerves ...

So, here are my two grade sheets ...

The first thing that may have caught your attention is the change in my optional subject. I understand that it shows the confused state I was in during the last main shots. This is a mistake that every aspirant should avoid. Pick an option that makes you feel involved, that you can connect with, and that won't change (most importantly) ... J. Mental clarity is the key to this exam and life, of course.

I started my preparation for the elective (Anthropology) during April of last year. April and May were used for basic reading and for reviewing the syllabus once. In addition, I began to prepare my notes for each topic by reviewing the content of books and the Internet.

I tried to incorporate a lot of diagrams, flowcharts, tables in my notes (some I prepared on my own). For Paper II, I looked for case studies and examples related to the customs and rituals of various tribes in India and also around the world. This probably improved the quality of the responses. By the end of August, I was able to finish the notes on most of the topics. So, starting in September, my only focus was to read over and over again what I had written and write the answers to the questions from previous years on a daily basis. Starting with 2-3 responses in September, I progressed to 5-6 responses in October every day.

Now a score of 250 may sound decent, but since I changed my elective, I had to spend a lot of time on it, which led to neglect of general studies papers, especially paper 4. On top of this, going to work kept me busy for a significant part of the day. Therefore, again, CHANGING THE OPTIONAL IS A BAD STRATEGY. My GS Paper and Essay paper grades could have been much better as long as I had rationally chosen my option.

Now we go to the general studies article. I was preparing from a small town Vapi in Gujarat. All he had was information about India. First of all, many thanks to Insights. I followed this website regularly. All the answer writing practice I did was from here. In fact, I had kept a notebook for the four articles where I took notes of the compilation of monthly responses of all the good responses, in addition to the regular response writing. I'd say it was thanks to that that I was able to develop the skills to try each item fully and they gave me 4-5 minutes to diagram and underline as well.

If you have to write reasonably good answers in GS, read the question correctly. This is the first and foremost requirement. Then, structure your answer well: introduction, content (which generally understands the pros and cons) and finally the inference. Your answer can be complemented by how you can interrelate your current knowledge with these questions.

One thing I would like to mention here is that I did not read any books for GS-4 (Ethics), all I did was practice writing responses and I also paid the price for this approach. So be sure to read all the GS-4 topics from a standard book well first and then write. This will add a lot of substance to your answers. The same goes for all GS papers. Also, attention should be paid to all issues. When you respect the content of their answer, you will surely get all the respect back in the form of good marks that will carry it out.

Also make your answers worthy of scoring by making lots of diagrams, graphs. I improvised diagrams even on GS paper -2. Also, try to refer to the current news related to the questions even from the static parts of the syllabus. For ex. In case of questions about food processing, mention the innovation of the National Agricultural Market.

There is a beautiful line (from Great Rabindranath Tagore) that I found in a book. “You should be a swan even in the murkiest waters. Purity and clarity of heart and mind should be able to win all wars.

Today, when I look back, I can say that this success is worth the pain and the sacrifices. This exam needs you to give yourself to it wholeheartedly. Books are sure to become part of your routine once you start to enjoy the process. In addition, a large number of factors must be combined for everything to go well. So, take care of yourself, stay healthy, stay happy, and move on. (SOURCE-INTERNET)

Best wishes to each and everyone

Make a query, follow me and your answer is an impulse for me.

I passed UPSC CSE 2016 with a decent rank of 171 while working a 9 hour job in the private sector.
The most important thing about this exam is discovering our individual strengths and weaknesses. Once this is done, the preparation strategy must be shaped according to the availability of time and our personality.

I was working for a private aerospace and defense company in Hyderabad (I resigned after the Mains exam) and the working hours were from 7:30 a.m. M. At 5 p. M. From Monday to Friday. As it was a production job, some days were a bit hectic, but it gave me plenty of time on weekends and at night to focus.

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I passed UPSC CSE 2016 with a decent rank of 171 while working a 9 hour job in the private sector.
The most important thing about this exam is discovering our individual strengths and weaknesses. Once this is done, the preparation strategy must be shaped according to the availability of time and our personality.

I was working for a private aerospace and defense company in Hyderabad (I resigned after the Mains exam) and the working hours were from 7:30 a.m. M. At 5 p. M. From Monday to Friday. As it was a production job, some days were a bit hectic, but it gave me plenty of time on weekends and evenings to focus on my studies.

Also, I used to study during office hours after finishing my work early and during breaks. Many days, I would stay in the office for more than five years just to study, because this gave me a peaceful and conducive environment. I must confess that most of my optional preparation was done in office.
Below is my network mark sheet

My average day was like this

Between 7:30 a. M. And 1:00 p. M. (Lunch), I was somehow trying to squeeze in a minimum of 1 hour of study after completing my daily tasks.
During lunch, I usually finished lunch early and used the remaining time to study from
2 pm to 5 pm again trying to finish my deadlines early and extend my study hours.
After the office, the afternoons from 7:30 pm to 9:30 pm was my most productive time.

This gave me 3-4 hours of productive study on weekdays and 6-8 hours on weekends. During the weekends, I practiced mock tests
for Mains, took a 4-week leave, and luckily my manager was very supportive of my decision.

In short, I believe that it is possible to manage both work and studies. What is required is faith, firm determination, analysis of oneself and of the work and finally a correct plan.

If these things are there, the grace of God and the support of your peer / parent group will fall into place.

All the best!

Edit: Shortly I will write my detailed strategy for optional PSIR and also for GS.
It was my first attempt and I did not attend any training.

Priyank Joshi, answered for you.

I started preparing for CSE in 2014, the year before I finished my engineering. For two years, I joined a coach in Allahabad (graduate of NIT Allahabad). Along with college classes, the most she could put in was three hours a night.

Being a beginner, that would be consumed mainly in the reading of newspapers and in the daily edition of those "most important articles"; which later even kabadiwale bhaiya refused to accept. Wrong decisions!

I was aiming for the 2016 attempt, but many episodes (story for another day) inside and outside of me led to failure in the preliminaries.


Thi

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Priyank Joshi, answered for you.

I started preparing for CSE in 2014, the year before I finished my engineering. For two years, I joined a coach in Allahabad (graduate of NIT Allahabad). Along with college classes, the most she could put in was three hours a night.

Being a beginner, that would be consumed mainly in the reading of newspapers and in the daily edition of those "most important articles"; which later even kabadiwale bhaiya refused to accept. Wrong decisions!

I was aiming for the 2016 attempt, but many episodes (story for another day) inside and outside of me led to failure in the preliminaries.


This episode was followed by a mental block that I have really worked hard for 2 years and rest is what I deserve. In fact, I started my prep really well starting in November 2016. It was a good week where I slept after office hours and used to wake up rejuvenated in the early hours of the day to finish a to-do list. I remember completing many chapters of Laxmikanth's Indian Polity in that week. An hour of rest in the office witnessed a new break: 15 minutes for lunch and 45 minutes for the "daily news". The orderly kind of life!

But the Prime Minister had different plans for the nation and for me. Demonetization plans were launched. As a business analyst for a large private sector bank, he was burdened with a lot, a lot of work. My incredible work-life balance turned miserable.


I had a dream, the dream of becoming an IAS Class 1 officer, yes! without any exaggeration. I had faith in myself that I can prepare to be at work, but the time frame can be extended; success may be delayed until the 2018 attempt. November was an amazing month. Every day, I used to write down the pros and cons of quitting on a piece of paper and I used to convert the same facts 'for' or 'against' my 'decision of the day'.

It was certainly a very difficult time. What added to the harshness was my humble origins, my father on the verge of retirement, the responsibilities of the eldest daughter, breakdown at work regarding plan B and what not.

People around had suggestions for "polar opposites." Few said it's just the in-office phase and that it will pass soon. But what if it continues? At that point, my trial period will end and the notification period will be extended to three months compared to a month now, leaving me in the middle of nowhere. Ah! my mind was looking for peace.

Needless to say, the closed ones always backed me up. The mist cleared when I said to myself, one beautiful night: “A decision is neither good nor bad. It is up to me to make him the best ”.

I finally quit in mid-December and continued my time management spree as mentioned above for a total of 2.5 months of balancing CSE preparation with a job. This included watching Mrunal videos on tape, brushing teeth with RSTV discussions, and reading 'Indian History Topics' in ATM queues!

By the way, I continued in the same spirit until Mains 2017, thanks a lot to these lines on my wall.

"I quit my job. I don't have a Plan B. All for a dream, a dream reflected in my eyes. I dream that my parents want to live in me. A dream of a better India."

The most important thing is never to underestimate yourself or your abilities. This exam is not an aptitude-based exam like IIT or IIM, but it requires a combination of many things such as aptitude, hard work, perseverance, ability to think, and ability to express yourself. There is no one who has all of these abilities, but yes, we all have some of these abilities. All we need is to identify our capabilities and hone them, and at the same time improve ourselves in other areas as well. The most important thing is to believe that you are equally capable of deciphering this exam.

Most people who pass this test have a

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The most important thing is never to underestimate yourself or your abilities. This exam is not an aptitude-based exam like IIT or IIM, but it requires a combination of many things such as aptitude, hard work, perseverance, ability to think, and ability to express yourself. There is no one who has all of these abilities, but yes, we all have some of these abilities. All we need is to identify our capabilities and hone them, and at the same time improve ourselves in other areas as well. The most important thing is to believe that you are equally capable of deciphering this exam.

Most of the people who pass this exam have average academics, what differentiates them is their attitude for this exam. Attitude is something that cannot be developed thinking that, oh, now I will be positive. Oh I'm the best and blah blah

You need a reason to pass this exam is the first requirement.

Motive aside, you must be mentally prepared to pay the price to achieve your goal. This price is time, failures, frustration, tension, and constant fear. All candidates go through that and a 99% breakdown here. The people who sustain it only emerge as champions. So, more than intelligence, it is your patience and perseverance that leads you to success.

A correct attitude should not only make you strong enough to face obstacles, but a suitable candidate is one who introspectively follows and improves himself. This is very important. If we perform well, we must find ways to improve, and if we fail, we must find where we are missing.

A very important factor is motivation and appreciation. The attitude will wither in your absence. So avoiding pessimistic people. Being in the company of positive people and people who motivate you is very important. Also a good performance on tests helps to provide constant motivation. All of this helps a lot.

Most importantly, this is not an exam, but a process for improvement, when we prepare with this attitude, there is always room to learn even after subsequent attempts and failures.

It all depends on your own priorities and requirements. I had done the opposite, that is, I had dropped out of the UPSC exam midway through the main exam when I was asked to urgently join another job.

In 1982, I had passed the preliminaries of the Civil Service Exam (CSE) at my first opportunity. During our time, there used to be a total of 8 papers for the main exam. Two language assignments (grades are not counted), two general studies assignments and 4 assignments of two electives (two assignments each for each elective).

It had already appeared in two language articles. And it was in th

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It all depends on your own priorities and requirements. I had done the opposite, that is, I had dropped out of the UPSC exam midway through the main exam when I was asked to urgently join another job.

In 1982, I had passed the preliminaries of the Civil Service Exam (CSE) at my first opportunity. During our time, there used to be a total of 8 papers for the main exam. Two language assignments (grades are not counted), two general studies assignments and 4 assignments of two electives (two assignments each for each elective).

It had already appeared in two language articles. And it was at this time that I received an offer to join as an assistant professor of physics at a government university in Rajasthan on the basis of a merit position in MSc. It was a temporary job, but I needed it urgently due to my bad financial situation. The time they gave him to get into work was only one week. If I didn't join the job, the offer would go to the next person on the merit list. This was the prevailing system then.

I had a difficult time making a decision. An additional problem was that the place where I would join was about 500 km from Jaipur, where it appeared in the main UPSC CSE exam.

Since there were 4-5 days left to join the new service, I somehow also appeared in the two General Studies articles. So, now there are 4 papers left. To do?

My family's financial situation was so bad that I didn't have the luxury of forgetting about the job offer. The starting salary was equivalent to the IAS salary scale (in those days, base salary of ₹ 700 per month + DA, etc.). I thought I could at least try to handle both, giving the job in question first priority.

So I left Jaipur that very night, after appearing in my general studies articles. He arrived at the place of publication the next morning and joined as an assistant professor.

New place. New job. There was no place to stay. There were no hotels, as it was a small town although it was a district headquarters. Therefore, there was hardly time left to study the 4 remaining (optional) jobs.

I applied for a leave of absence from the university principal for the next 2 jobs of my first elective mathematics. It was difficult to convince him. Somehow I managed to get out and after an overnight trip (can you believe I had to travel a full 500km trip, standing on the crowded bus?). He appeared in the 2 jobs in math, and he took the night bus and joined the next morning. Too tired and exhausted. But there is no choice.

The next 2 articles (in Physics) were after a 2-day interval. Since it was my PG subject, I was also willing to show up unprepared. I applied for a one-day license again. But this time, the director was on leave. The deputy director flatly refused to grant the license. No amount of persuasion would work. He asked me to resign if I wanted to, as a week after joining I was looking for the license for the second time. But resignation was not an option for me. He needed a job right away.

Some colleagues advised me to leave without permission (or some kind of medical license), but that was against my principles and, in any case, I had to officially appear in the UPSC exam and could have negatively affected both jobs .

So, I had to drop the last two jobs of the main exam. Absent.

Later, I found out that I had scored fairly good on my GS tests and even in Math I had scored reasonably good, although I had little preparation and had to travel on my feet all night before so I couldn't sleep at all. the night. . I could have easily gotten one of the best services (if not the best) if it had just been featured in my last 2 articles.

Of course, I was selected in the following two opportunities, since during our time there were a total of 3 opportunities. And I was selected while doing the same job in the same place.

So folks, it all depends on your personal circumstances. Do you have financial requirements to immediately start a job? What is your end goal? Can't you be satisfied in any other job, I mean not that of public administration? You may need to take a call to discuss your own priorities and requirements.

If you have a strong financial background and your ambition is to join the civil service, you can take a break from your current job and focus on preparing for civil service. But, if you have some pressing financial requirements, then it should also be possible to study alongside work.

There are a lot of examples of people who were not only selected at UPSC, but also placed in the top ranks while doing some other job during exam preparation. I can give my own example. During my two remaining opportunities, in the main exam (written part), according to my information, on both occasions I was in the first positions, even though I was in the regular job mentioned above at the time of my preparations for the CSE. Of course, due to poor interview scores both times, my overall ranking went down.

Therefore, it is eminently possible to pass the UPSC exam even while doing a job and get the best grades as well. But, if you can afford to quit your current job to fully focus on your exam preparation, it may be better for you.

As for the other options, if you fail the UPSC exam, well, it again depends on your own background. Your education and qualifications. Each field has its own opportunities. For example, if you belong to a higher-ranking institute (for example, from IIT or AIIMS), you may have many options. But, if you graduated from a subject that doesn't offer too many job opportunities, you may need to be a little careful when leaving your current job, even more so if it's a good job. You may also need to determine if you can get a lien on your current job, if you quit; it may give you the option to rejoin if possible and necessary.

Ultimately, there is no one-size-fits-all formula. It all depends on your own background and your circumstances. Make a conscious and considered decision. If necessary, consult a supporter who knows you personally (and knows your requirements) and has knowledge and experience.

It is surely possible to prepare for UPSC, along with an 8-hour-a-day job. You've surely heard the proverb "A busy person always finds time."

Here comes the action plan:

Assuming you will be busy for another 2 hours (of travel), you will have 14 hours left. You can have 6 to 7 hours of deep sleep, plus 2 hours for other assignments.

With all that you will have solid 4 to 5 precious hours, which is more than what is required for your preparation.

Strictly complying with the following:

1) Avoid eating junk food (or anything with a preservative).

2) Cultivate the habit of 'always live in

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It is surely possible to prepare for UPSC, along with an 8-hour-a-day job. You've surely heard the proverb "A busy person always finds time."

Here comes the action plan:

Assuming you will be busy for another 2 hours (of travel), you will have 14 hours left. You can have 6 to 7 hours of deep sleep, plus 2 hours for other assignments.

With all that you will have solid 4 to 5 precious hours, which is more than what is required for your preparation.

Strictly complying with the following:

1) Avoid eating junk food (or anything with a preservative).

2) Cultivate the habit of 'always living in the present'.

3) Drink lots of water (at least 2 to 3 liters per day).

4) You can often drink fresh fruit juice or buttermilk.

5) Practice 'Yoga' and 'Pranaayaama' early in the morning.

6) Always have a new way of looking at things.

7) Discuss with knowledgeable people.

8) For every hour (during your preparation), relax for three to four minutes with deep breathing.

9) Avoid nighttime brewing (i.e. burning the oil in the middle of the night).

10) Get up early in the morning and start your preparation after 'Yoga' and 'Pranaayaama'.

11) Keep a journal or log of your study habits.

12) Accept failures (if any), because they will become a stepping stone to success.

13) Smiling costs nothing, but it rewards a lot. That's why he always keeps smiling.

14) You must know that you are working for "A GREAT CAUSE", so you should always follow "PULL SYSTEM" (and never follow "push system").

15) Since you are working, you will have the 'freedom' to 'invest' 10% of your salary in noble training.

16) Keep remembering and thanking the 'Almighty' for all that you have been able to accomplish during the day.

Looking at your preferences collectively (and not in order) I can say that teaching will be the most suitable job. Teaching can be done in multiple locations and for multiple students. We will discuss your different teaching options-
1 In Civil Technician Services
Join any of the low budget civil services for training teaching near you. You may need your network branding sheet for this purpose if requested or at least a demonstration. The benefits of this include, you have to study your own curriculum one way or another, your concepts will be tested among 100 students (which will be the worst case if and

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Looking at your preferences collectively (and not in order) I can say that teaching will be the most suitable job. Teaching can be done in multiple locations and for multiple students. Let's analyze your different teaching options-
1 In Civil Services Coaching
Join any low-budget civil services coaching to teach near you. You may need your network branding sheet for this purpose if requested or at least a demonstration. The benefits of this include, you have to study your own syllabus one way or another, your concepts will be tested among 100 students (which will be the worst case if you have little command of the basics), your monthly expenses will come from easily during your exam your students will prepare for it too and therefore you can get licensed without any heck. It will hardly take 4 5 hours of work out of your day.

2 In any high school coaching
As an UPSC aspirant you need to have a concrete base of basics and thus high school students pose you no challenge. Teaching them is very easy and in fact entertaining. Output in terms of money may be low (actually depend on you batch strength)

1 caution for these kind of jobs is, job seekers often assume that he/she will pour students with knowledge and become the great teacher they will ever have in life. A big NO. Let me tell you about the darker side of this profession. When you reconnoiter into coaching centers, coachingwallas will talk you a lot about how they desire to teach students but deep in their heart they they will ask you just 1 question - can you shine my business ? Do whatever foolishness, if students stays coachinwalla will be are happy. unfortunately some of the coaching batch is just want a joker, like how much they are frustrated with their life and they came here to entertain only. So a word of wisdom from my side is "know to whom are you teaching and act accordingly." First class is all you have hence it will be crucial.
A few other similar jobs like writing a book of local publishers (obviously you have to copy content from standard book).

Few other jobs like lower post in hotel management needs some professional understanding. Very similar is the case of bar tendering in which you need to remember the name and ingredients of different drinks but these jobs took odd hours like 6 pm to 2 am and for that you need a strong connection in hotels or pubs.

Best of luck :)

Don’t, just don’t leave your job. I am a student of IIT, worked for 2 years and then resigned the job for IAS. I was smashed by UPSC in first attempt as I could not clear even the prelims.

The time after failure was the hardest time for me and I was cursing myself for that I quit my job. Although he got the job, but it was difficult to explain the gap. Companies generally reject you after the breach, even if you are very good at technical knowledge.

UPSC is highly unpredictable and is like opium, the more it tries, the less it can withstand. After the failure, I decided to make a second and third attempt.

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Don't do it, just don't quit your job. I am an IIT student, I worked for 2 years and then I resigned from the IAS position. UPSC crushed me on the first try as I couldn't even make it through the preliminaries.

The time after failure was the hardest time for me and I was cursing myself for that I quit my job. Although he got the job, but it was difficult to explain the gap. Companies generally reject you after the breach, even if you are very good at technical knowledge.

UPSC is highly unpredictable and it is like opium, the more you taste the less you can resist. After failure I decided to go for second and third attempt but later my good sense prevailed and took a job. I will be preparing with the job. Every year people clear this exam while being in job. So try to learn how to manage time.

As far intellectual growth is concern, well I also had same feeling but the truth is there are more smarter people in private sector than in government sector. You will be working as SDM with people who as just 10th or 12th pass out. Don’t dream that you will be working under PM or CM.

So better to get the reality of the ground and then jump. I am not saying that you should not leave job but you must be very sure, financial dependence for 3–4 years with no pressure from parents.

So try to read for 3–4 months while being in job, see the previous year papers, observe your writing practice but don’t blinding jump because you don’t like your job.

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