How did Elon Musk deal with procrastination in his early days?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Madyson Byrd



How did Elon Musk deal with procrastination in his early days?

I don't think you need Elon Musk to answer that question. Procrastination, I suppose, is the easiest of human traits to overcome. It is one of the first steps towards success. If you can't even do that then you have no idea what will come after that. Given the problems Mr. Musk must have seen, I suppose he rarely would have given much thought to "how do you overcome procrastination?" In his opinion, the biggest challenge must always have been finding the best solution to a given problem.

I agree with Kanav Setia.
He must have been very clear about what we wanted to do, where he wanted to be. There are two things to add about these people, their decision and speed. Given the options, they are quick to decide and execute with speed to be envied.
Their quick decision-making, conviction, and speed is the reason they hardly ever procrastinate.

You may have a different take on Elon as if I've only met him 3 times in the last 20 years, I've known him since I was in my 20s.

Elon is 2 years older than me and we were both living in South Africa when I first met him. He seemed like a normal computer nerd to me. In my opinion, he wasn't very smart, but he was more "obsessed" with computers and coding, which he was definitely pretty good at (for that time). But being "smart" isn't about being a good programmer, is it?

He turned that obsession into a company called ZIP2, which he founded with his brother. It wasn't even his idea.
I never t

Keep reading

You may have a different take on Elon as if I've only met him 3 times in the last 20 years, I've known him since I was in my 20s.

Elon is 2 years older than me and we were both living in South Africa when I first met him. He seemed like a normal computer nerd to me. In my opinion, he wasn't very smart, but he was more "obsessed" with computers and coding, which he was definitely pretty good at (for that time). But being "smart" isn't about being a good programmer, is it?

He turned that obsession into a company called ZIP2, which he founded with his brother. It wasn't even his idea.
I never thought this ZIP2 company of yours would ever be successful… I didn't see the need to do so as they were trying to create some online city guides for newspapers, which I felt would be out of date in the near future.
He was right, but that didn't stop them from selling the company to Compaq for $ 300 million.
TouchΓ©, Elon, I thought. You proved me wrong I should have invested in you ...

But honestly, I didn't think any of them were incredibly smart or talented, I was just lucky ...
Compaq didn't do anything with ZIP2, it wasn't a good investment for them ... I've never heard of that since.
It was just one of those flukes from that time, where big companies invested in startups and Elon just got lucky ... and that changed his entire life.
Back then, it was very common for a large company to invest in a startup instead of giving that money for taxes ...
2 of my friend's companies were also acquired at the same time. Has anyone heard of a company called ICQ? - the same ...

The second time I met Elon was when he was at PayPal, and that was indeed a great company ... it still is, but again, his role there was not mandatory for the success of the company. PayPal was not his idea. It wasn't even called PayPal when I met it ... it was X.com.

He seemed very devoted and very passionate about him and that definitely made him smart in that field. But I felt that his lack of confidence would not make him a leader ... so I was surprised by his success later as CEO ...
But the sale of PayPal had obviously led him to build Tesla and therefore a mandatory step. on his rise to greatness. .

Needless to say, PayPal was the fruit of several kinds, not just Elon. He never seemed the smartest of the bunch to me ... there were Ken Howery, Luke Nosek, Max Levchin, Peter Thiel and Yu Pan.
He didn't have the charisma that he has now, he was shy and didn't have the confidence to speak in public or lead anyone, and of all the founders of PayPal, he struck me as the least intelligent ... or at least the least successful. . I didn't think much of him at the time. I never imagined he would be a household name, I just saw him as a lucky guy with ambition.

But of course he surprised us all ... and he founded Tesla in 2003, and I think that's when he really got to be 'smart' as he had to learn a lot about things that he had no idea about ... cars, electricity, batteries and even solar energy. . Tesla had a lot of challenges, but again I felt like I was bad at business and made some bad decisions, like building the Tesla Roadster as its first and only car. Tesla was on the verge of bankruptcy ... it needed a lot more financing than it imagined.
And that's not the only time, Elon did it a couple of times.
Elon Musk recently said that Tesla was just a month away from bankruptcy as it ramp-up production of the Model 3 ...

So Elon is not a genius ...
I don't know his IQ, but I know that he loves to learn and have a great imagination, and that's what made him 'smart' in everything he did ...

He is what I call "focused smart". He understands a lot, but only in one field: the field he was in at the time ... electric cars, spaceships, tunnels, torches or whatever.
He finds out about something new, grasps it, and learns everything he can about it ... becomes obsessed about it ... enough that people will invest in it. I think it's a type of autism, but it surely helped Elon.

But the really smart people who actually do smart work are the ones who work for him ... he's not smart enough to get too deep into the technical side. He hired geniuses ... very smart people, and he learns from them.

I met / saw him the third time when he launched the Cybertruck and it was fascinating to hear as he was clearly very passionate about him, but again looking at him ... listening to him - observing his body language ... I just didn't feel he was smart or confident enough to lead such a large and important company.

Honestly, I think he's more of a man of ideas, and money and fame allowed him to hire smart people to make that happen ...

I never thought he was smart, but he was smart: he knows how to see opportunities and take chances with them, risk his own money and his name. That is incredible.

He's not very smart, but it's his lack of business savvy that made him lucky ... and so successful.
Sometimes in life you just need to take risks and be visionary, even if it doesn't make business sense. And he certainly had luckier than brains in most of his companies.

He was lucky with ZIP2, which led him to PayPal, as that led to a really good exit that allowed him to invest in Tesla, an all-electric car.
But without the luck you had with ZIP2, none of that would have happened.
He would have stayed as a programmer in some unknown company in SF or South Africa. Sometimes it takes luck more than being smart. That is the life for you!

>>> Update: Elon Musk did not start Tesla. Eberhard and Tarpenning founded Tesla in July 2003, although the company remained in stealth mode until July 2006, when it revealed the Roadster. They attracted investment from Musk, who was awarded a chairman position with his investment in 2004, during Tesla's first round of funding. Then later he became the CEO.

>>> Update 2 - to the people who texted me about why I said Elon had autism - he just admitted on SNL that he has Asperger's syndrome, which is a type of autism. So actually he was right. It wasn't an insult, just something I noticed in him since he was young, coming back from the PayPal days. I do not consider it against him, quite the contrary. I think that's what he did.
My attorney has the same and is a genius when it comes to law ... anything else, not really ... but it helps him focus and be really good at one thing.

I worked for two of their companies ... Solar City (now Tesla Solar) and Tesla. My experience was not very good ... I was working at Solar City when he officially took office (he was already a major shareholder before that). At the time, sales were in a slight drop compared to the previous year, but shortly after he officially took over, those sales went into a death spiral. Elon decided that he really didn't like the aesthetic nature of solar 'panels' and decided to make a quick transition to the solar 'roof'. 'Roof' was still in the design phase. Made the decision to start taking sunroof deposits and

Keep reading

I worked for two of their companies ... Solar City (now Tesla Solar) and Tesla. My experience was not very good ... I was working at Solar City when he officially took office (he was already a major shareholder before that). At the time, sales were in a slight drop compared to the previous year, but shortly after he officially took over, those sales went into a death spiral. Elon decided that he really didn't like the aesthetic nature of solar 'panels' and decided to make a quick transition to the solar 'roof'. 'Roof' was still in the design phase. Made the decision to start taking solar roof reservoirs and stop pressing solar panels. He also decided to ditch the sales teams (80%). I wanted to boost online sales (just like Tesla Auto does). That sales model didn't work, and sales fell rapidly. The sunroof is amazing aesthetically, and the product is mature, yet the means to install it, and the price is still prohibitive for the masses. He also wanted to push his batteries (Power Wall) for home use. That's cool, and it's a good product, but it's generally a supplement to a BIG solar system ... so ... If you don't sell solar systems, then you won't sell a lot of batteries. He also wanted to push his batteries (Power Wall) for home use. That's cool, and it's a good product, but it's generally a supplement to a BIG solar system ... so ... If you don't sell solar systems, then you won't sell a lot of batteries. He also wanted to push his batteries (Power Wall) for home use. That's cool, and it's a good product, but it's generally a supplement to a BIG solar system ... so ... If you don't sell solar systems, then you won't sell a lot of batteries.

Since taking office two years ago, Solar City (Tesla) has seen massive layoffs and layoffs. Thousands of hard-working people have lost their jobs (50%) due to poor business decisions. You don't hear much about this, nor do you hear much about their layoffs at Tesla Auto (they've had massive layoffs, too). I don't know many people who still work there, but the couple of people I do know say it's a shadow of what it once was ... and ... morale is at an all-time low. You don't hear much about this either. What you hear about are the next… latest and greatest Musk ventures. Why is that? It is due to carefully coordinated marketing and manipulation of your "brand" ...

I will say that when I worked there the internal training provided / offered to all employees was outstanding. The apps (we used a lot of them) to preform our jobs were well written and allowed employees to work efficiently.

Also noteworthy ...

When I started there, we had over 125 employees working outside of my office. When I was fired, there were 17 employees left. Most of those employees consisted of 2 installation teams, a person to perform each of the specific functions of the office, a manager and an administrative assistant, and a couple of people in the warehouse.

In my opinion, the supposedly innovative business models of Elon and the 'Vision' deserve the criticism and scrutiny that it is now waiting to receive.

In my time there (just under two years) I only knew one employee who owned a Tesla. That's because, frankly, no one who works there can afford them. Met a handful of employees (out of hundreds) who have solar power on their roof, and one who knew they had the Tesla battery in the home (power wall) ... As an employee, there really is no incentive to buy any of the products ... Especially cars! If you bought a solar system, you got a $ 1000 discount, but had to wait until there was a space in the schedule to accommodate the installation. The average price of a residential solar system, even after rebates / incentives, usually starts at 25 to 30K. Depending on the size, it goes up quickly from there. Most of the employees simply couldn't afford them.

They paid me less than promised. They showed me the same kind of pay scales that are shown to everyone. I NEVER had a chance to win that amount of money. You could have spent 70-80 hours or more trying, but the payment was directly related to sales volume (it wasn't in sales just to be clear), and that's common sense ... when sales went down, so was made the most of ALL the employees pay. Very few people received a salary and they were some of the first to be fired.

I don't see any first-hand accounts of people who worked for a Musk company. All I see, as answers, are cuts and pastes from what I call the 'Musk propaganda machine' ...

He talks a good game ... but what has he actually accomplished other than becoming a billionaire? I guess you can envy that ... but admire him, how does he do it? I hope not.

Spending time alone is very, very important

Note: I don't think I've ever been compared to Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, etc. I am nowhere near as successful or accomplished as most of the people on this list. But for what it's worth, I'll give you a trait that I think is common among most of these people (including me).

Lots of time alone
Most of these people spent a great deal of time alone as children and young adults. And most of these people still spend a much higher percentage of their time alone today than most outsiders would think.

Especially when people are gr

Keep reading

Spending time alone is very, very important

Note: I don't think I've ever been compared to Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, etc. I am nowhere near as successful or accomplished as most of the people on this list. But for what it's worth, I'll give you a trait that I think is common among most of these people (including me).

Lots of time alone
Most of these people spent a great deal of time alone as children and young adults. And most of these people still spend a much higher percentage of their time alone today than most outsiders would think.

Especially when people are growing up, spending time alone gives one the space to explore, be weird, learn, imagine, and dream.

Reading is really (REALLY) important.
Read a wide variety of books and articles that expand your imagination. Don't just read easy books (like Harry Potter). Read difficult texts that really stretch your mind.

Read fiction and non-fiction. Read wonderful novels written by authors from distant lands. Read things that challenge your political thinking. Read the Bible, the Quran, Buddhist texts, and ancient mythology. And don't just read the conventional stuff that you are assigned to in school (like Hemingway, Shakespeare, and more), but try searching for authors on your own.

Because most of the people mentioned grew up in a different era, they spent a great deal of their time reading the encyclopedia. Many of them would eventually read all the volumes of the encyclopedias. These people had an insatiable need to learn new things.

When these people walked to class, they were probably reading a book or magazine (in those days, it was a paper book). Some of these people were even injured by colliding with things because they were reading.

Most of these people had parents who asked them to READ LESS.

Today the encyclopedia is free and is on the Internet. But today the encyclopedia is so large that it would be impossible to read it in a lifetime, so today the options about what you read could be a little more difficult. But reading is still really important.

Theatrical performance
At a young age, most of these people spent more time acting than others. Very few of these people spent their time playing organized sports ... instead, they were in their bedroom, backyard, or nearby park playing alone. They were letting their imaginations run wild.

They were imagining themselves as secret agents, slaying dragons, gathering their toy soldiers for battle, starting businesses, dealing with family situations, and more.

Experiment
It's amazing how many successful people set things on fire, blew things up, captured and studied insects, built bird nests, and more. My guess is that each and every person listed underwent multiple electric shocks (some by accident, some on purpose).

They were building, creating, seeing and observing. And they were the ones in charge of the experiment, they were the instigators.

Many Creative Activities
While most of the people listed are known for their right brain prowess, most spent a large percentage of their childhood and adolescence doing very creative things. They were writing stories and plays, painting, sculpting, writing poems and lyrics, writing computer programs, and more.

Creating versus consuming
Reading, watching wonderful movies, listening to music, etc. they are great ways to pass the time. But they are passive, they are consuming functions.

Most of these successful people spent a large percentage of their time creating versus consuming. They were building things, starting things, etc. This is really important.

Today it is more difficult to spend time creating because there are many more options to consume. In the days when most of the people mentioned above were growing up, you got bored pretty quickly with consumer choices (usually reading a book or watching bad TV was the best option) where today there are many more options. In fact, the tablet is essentially designed to maximize consumption (unlike the PC, which is a better tool for creation).

Get away from school social pressures
School, especially middle and high school, is incredibly high social pressure for everyone. People are competing for positions and cliques are constantly forming and relaxing. There is a "Game of Thrones" aspect of high school status that is ultra competitive and hard to escape.

By spending time alone, people get needed breaks from high school Game of Thrones. Time alone allows you to spend time really exploring yourself (rather than spending time adjusting to some kind of norm).

These days alone time is frowned upon.
Something happened in the last 30 years to encourage parents to spend more time with their children. Another big trend has been for parents to give their children opportunities by enrolling them in many sports, weekend classes, summer learning retreats, and more.

While there are so many good things about the trend of more involved parenting, one of the most important unintended consequences is that children have much less time alone than before. And even when they are alone, they have the means to be part of a larger group through social media, SMS, and more. So it is more difficult for them to escape the social pressures of the school.

Therefore, we should hope that the best strategy for today's children is not the same as the best strategy for generations past. But most people (young and old), especially those who have a good social life and have had reasonable success, could use more time alone and more time for themselves.

Elon Musk has the work ethic of a machine.

Working as hard as Elon Musk isn't difficult in and of itself, it's just about putting the numbers in, but that's exactly what makes it difficult.

The most challenging thing to get this value is not what you put in, but what you give up.

He understands that Elon Musk definitely has a phenomenal work ethic, but it didn't come out of nowhere. Here are 4 things he's done that you can apply too:

  1. Remove Everything Unrelated to Work From Your Home - Elon Musk actually slept in his office. He surrounded himself with work, lived in his work and, most importantly
Keep reading

Elon Musk has the work ethic of a machine.

Working as hard as Elon Musk isn't difficult in and of itself, it's just about putting the numbers in, but that's exactly what makes it difficult.

The most challenging thing to get this value is not what you put in, but what you give up.

He understands that Elon Musk definitely has a phenomenal work ethic, but it didn't come out of nowhere. Here are 4 things he's done that you can apply too:

  1. Remove Everything Unrelated to Work From Your Home - Elon Musk actually slept in his office. He surrounded himself with work, lived on his job, and most importantly, eliminated any possibility of distractions at home.
  2. Be willing to sacrifice everything else: When you work 100+ hours a week (~ 14-15 hours a day), like Elon Musk did, you barely have enough time to sleep and eat, much less for anything else. 168 hours a week - 100 for work - 8 hours a day for sleep = 12 hours a week for eating, exercising, and spending time with friends. That's not even 2 hours a day that you have for something else. And remember, this doesn't give you time to relax just yet! The average person, who works 40 hours a week, has about 72 hours a week to dedicate to his family, friends and himself.
    1. If you're not willing to sacrifice family, friends, hobbies, and sleep in pursuit of your dream, it won't even come close to your type of work ethic.
    2. This does not mean that you have to sacrifice things to get there, but it is important that you know exactly what you are and are not willing to give up before trying to become Elon Musk.
  3. Work Unconditionally - Work, work and work without taking a break. You will lose focus, you will hate your life at times, and you wish you could take a break, but if you do, you will never develop the discipline to move on when the going gets really tough. Keep working even if everything goes against you and even if your feelings don't match. Get out of this idea that you have to be motivated, excited or feel good to work and instead work when you are bored, unmotivated and just want to sleep.
  4. Develop an Unwavering Call for Your Work - This is what it all boils down to in the end: Does your dream inspire you enough to be willing to do all of that? If, without a doubt, he does not speak very deeply to you, you will fail in trying to achieve such a harsh work ethic. Elon Musk had a dream that he couldn't let go even if he wanted to, it inspired him so much and called out to him so strongly that he didn't see giving up as an option. For him to quit, he would have to be dead and he really believes it.

Now, I don't know exactly what Elon Musk envisioned while working or what defining moment he lived through that inspired him so much, but it is clear that this touched more than just an idea within him.

And I'd bet he didn't start this out with passion, but rather his vision led him to try harder and harder.

Then as he invested, it all turned into what most people today call an obsession.

He definitely has a strong goal and something he gets very involved in, but while he has the power, discipline, and inspiration to do it, you have to remember one thing: you are not Elon Musk.

To get where he is today, Elon Musk had to sacrifice a lot. Hobbies, family, relationships, and lots of experiences.

If you're not willing to sacrifice these things because they mean too much to you, that's okay!

Too many people try to achieve success, sacrificing everything along the way, only to find out later that they sacrificed things that would have actually made them happy in the end.

The point is this: know what you want and don't want to sacrifice, otherwise you could find yourself at the end of the line looking back, realizing that what you wanted was sacrificed long ago.

You can work as hard as Elon Musk, but do it on your own terms. Sacrifice only what you agree to give up and keep the rest. But, within those parameters, keep polishing.

In the end, it is your life, not anyone else's and you want to live it in the best way for you!

I only have one data point to answer this question with, but I think it's a good one.

Having previously worked with Gary Vaynerchuk for six and a half years, I can tell you what he did: delegate and outsource tasks to others.

Here's the thing: Gary firmly believes in focusing on his strengths, so for him, procrastination really didn't exist (at least as far as I could tell), because as the business scaled and he took on more and more personally , he built his team together with him.

What he specialized in (one of many things) was figuring out what he was best at and

Keep reading

I only have one data point to answer this question with, but I think it's a good one.

Having previously worked with Gary Vaynerchuk for six and a half years, I can tell you what he did: delegate and outsource tasks to others.

Here's the thing: Gary firmly believes in focusing on his strengths, so for him, procrastination really didn't exist (at least as far as I could tell), because as the business scaled and he took on more and more personally , he built his team together with him.

What he specialized in (one of many things) was figuring out what was best and concentrating solely on that, while delegating most of the other things to those who worked for him.

What he realized is this: When you enjoy what you do, you tend not to procrastinate.

Gary likes to build businesses, so that's exactly what he spent most of his time on.

He never really liked writing, but he does like to talk, so instead of procrastinating in one of his New York Times best-selling books, he created a system and a team around each other to execute that content in a more timely manner. and efficient. .

To this day, he talks his books while his ghost writing team divides his thoughts into chapters with proper grammar and punctuation.

In fact, that was my first assignment when I joined the team as an intern in 2010. I listened to the recordings of each of their book lecture sessions and compared what was said with what was written, so that I could pick up or call anyone. inconsistencies. The rest of the time I spent investigating or verifying the facts.

This was a great lesson that I learned from my time working with him. Focus on what you are good at and when the business requires more, don't be afraid to hire someone to address that end.

Also, as your team grows, continually collect 10% of the things you spend your time on that you find less valuable or less enjoyable and start delegating those kinds of tasks to others.

If you are asking this to adapt a billionaire's hobby, then you must believe that a billionaire is a billionaire because of his daily behavior and habit.

We all want to be like Elon Musk, #musketers

I list some of his hobbies, which I like about him and which make me a fan of Elon Musk:

πŸ‘‰ Usually skips breakfast and continues working since last night.

πŸ‘‰ You have slept in factories to work a lot.

πŸ‘‰ He is a visionary man, he envisions everything for the next 5 years.

πŸ‘‰ You always wanted to change the world and now you are doing it, why was it successful? Because he has a habit

Keep reading

If you are asking this to adapt a billionaire's hobby, then you must believe that a billionaire is a billionaire because of his daily behavior and habit.

We all want to be like Elon Musk, #musketers

I list some of his hobbies, which I like about him and which make me a fan of Elon Musk:

πŸ‘‰ Usually skips breakfast and continues working since last night.

πŸ‘‰ You have slept in factories to work a lot.

πŸ‘‰ He is a visionary man, he envisions everything for the next 5 years.

πŸ‘‰ You always wanted to change the world and now you are doing it, why was it successful? Because he has a habit of saying to himself "I am the best", "I can do whatever I want", "I can change my world".

πŸ‘‰ You are grateful and forgive easily because there is only one point of focus in mind, be it focusing on people or much better focusing on your dream, on the meaning of your life.

πŸ‘‰ Don't let people come, they don't deserve your time, invest your time in your future.

πŸ‘‰ Your life is everything you think and imagine, think like Elon, be special, think like no one else can.

Like us, billionaires also continue to develop and change for the greater good, and change is only possible when a person changes their daily habit.

In conclusion, we cannot derive a fixed table of anyone's hobbies.

Thanks and regards

Arman

Elon Musk runs several successful companies.

He runs SpaceX, Tesla, The Boring Company, and Neuralink.

In order to carry out all his projects at once, Elon Musk has no time to procrastinate, if I may say so. He even just decided to walk away from Twitter in early February 2021 in order to fully focus on achieving goals.

Optimize your time to be hyper-productive. Even while doing this, you have to work every day of the week. This is the price to pay to revolutionize the world we live in.

In your case, it seems to work fine when you see all your su

Keep reading

Elon Musk runs several successful companies.

He runs SpaceX, Tesla, The Boring Company, and Neuralink.

In order to carry out all his projects at once, Elon Musk has no time to procrastinate, if I may say so. He even just decided to walk away from Twitter in early February 2021 in order to fully focus on achieving goals.

Optimize your time to be hyper-productive. Even while doing this, you have to work every day of the week. This is the price to pay to revolutionize the world we live in.

In his case, it seems to work well when you see all the successes he accumulates.

At our level, it seems safer to focus on a project and give everything to be successful. Not everyone is capable of being an Elon Musk. There is nothing shameful in admitting it.

When Elon Musk was asked how he learned to build rockets, he replied:

"I read books."

-

According to a CNBC article:

β€œIt is said that he read the entire Encyclopedia Britannica at the age of nine ...

and would meticulously read science fiction novels for more than 10 hours a day. "

-

During an interview, for her biography, Ashlee Vance interviewed Kimbal, Musk's brother, who stated:

"If it was the weekend, I could read two books in one day."

-

Unfortunately, Musk was frequently bullied as a child. And to my understanding, he didn't have many friends.

Musk seems to read a lot. And the more you read, the faster you go

Keep reading

When Elon Musk was asked how he learned to build rockets, he replied:

"I read books."

-

According to a CNBC article:

β€œIt is said that he read the entire Encyclopedia Britannica at the age of nine ...

and would meticulously read science fiction novels for more than 10 hours a day. "

-

During an interview, for her biography, Ashlee Vance interviewed Kimbal, Musk's brother, who stated:

"If it was the weekend, I could read two books in one day."

-

Unfortunately, Musk was frequently bullied as a child. And to my understanding, he didn't have many friends.

Musk seems to read a lot. And the more you read, the faster it gets.

Also, with few friends, he had a lot of free time for it.

-

In other recent news, Musk has drawn media attention for 'other interests' outside of reading: D

It is not exactly the "waste of time", but I believe that your initial position as a South African citizen and subsequent immigration to Canada / United States were major challenges that have delayed your business success for years.

One's starting position always has a significant influence on the development curve (especially exponential growth): the more favorable the environment in which one is starting, the better the results.

So I guess if Elon Musk had been born somewhere closer to SV, the world could have been a much more amazing place today.

He just went to work doing amazing wonders like building electric cars and exploring Mars.

Go to work. Be active and don't leave room for the error of procrastination. Get problems and projects so challenging and difficult, yet so rewarding and incredible that you will willingly flush the procrastination bug down the toilet and dive into generating value!

Other Guides:


GET SPECIAL OFFER FROM OUR PARTNER.